“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Monday, November 11, 2013

Getting out while you can.

There's a good post on Survival Blog by a man who took his family to Panama. Even if you aren't considering fleeing the Peoples Democratic Republic of Amerika, there are things in this guys story that will resonate with you.



This is the latest in a series of novels dealing with the collapse.  Rawles has gotten better as a writer, but he is still fixated on not offending anyone and that gives his novels some aggravating quirks. I've read all the preceding books and found them useful, so I will read this one as well.

Neil Strauss started out researching the "prepper" movement for a book,  and became a survivalist in the process.  He also set himself up with a new home in one of the off shore islands.  The book is a good read, both funny and informative. If you are considering becoming an expatriate, you should read it.  He found that it was a lot more work and expense than he intended.



22 comments:

  1. Aggravating Quirks?

    Somewhere there are thousands of literary skinned sheep buried in a mass grave all so Rawles can camouflage a few more wolves. Aggravating at best, at worst his imaginary minority exception stories will get someone raped, killed or worse.

    Still he has some good info and links off his website :)

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    1. I'm not as vehement about it as you are, though I agree the politically correct stuff is there. I feel the same way about the hyper religious aspect of his work, though I realize that's his true nature so it's less offensive if not less annoying. Still, he has gotten better in terms of the flow of his stories, the last book was actually pretty good I thought. And he does include useful, "actionable" information in every book. Overall, I feel like I always get my money's worth.

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  2. Regarding the Panamanian expat: Some good info to be sure, however his main reason for leaving the US falls flat. As much as this expat would like to believe that his dollars won't be spent on morally offensive causes, he still retains a dual citizenship--and thus subject to US taxation laws and therefore obamacare.

    I understand that the laws are now changing-- all US citizens living abroad are going to be taxed. Only way out? Renounce your citizenship.
    --Troy

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    1. Troy, I'm not really knowledgeable about the current tax laws though I know that the government is doing a lot to insure that no one can escape their clutches in that respect. When I worked in the oil and gas business you didn't pay U.S. taxes on income earned overseas but you did on income that originated in country. The main allure for me of the expatriate lifestyle is the vastly lower cost of living and the superior quality of life in a place like Costa Rica.

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  3. With so many other country's becoming/are Anti American. Are we better off staying here?? Or maybe go north. Mexico seems to be a drug war zone.

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    1. Rob, my brother's place in Mazatlan is idyllic. There is like or no crime where the foreigners live.

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  4. As long as there is no strife in the other country, everything will be fine. The only places I would go permanently would be Australia or England. However, I family I would not want to give up by moving. I almost never see them, but would probably never see them if I moved far away. I know travel is possible now, but will it always be possible? I think staying right here would be safer.

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  5. I love the last picture.

    If we left England, I would love to move to Canada. That is my first choice, we have family there that we love dearly. and they are amazing.

    But any where else? Maybe New Zealand they have the same weather as here. but have earth quakes. not so good.

    most likely in the next few years we will live at least a year in France, if not go for ever. I love it in France. There is land, it is of good quality and is about 1/3 of the price of here. I don't speak enough French I would be reliant of OH. But I would force myself to get a job with French people and then I would learn. I am quite happy with that idea. all the people I know who have moved to France and then moved back. lived in an area where there were lots of Brits. They don't integrate. This leads to problems.

    I haven't been to the USA so I cant say if I would move or not. it sure is a pretty country. France would be the easiest for us.

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    1. Australia has always been where I wanted to go. I applied for emigration there in1986 and again in 1994 but they turned us down. They said that Australia had enough native born residents with our skills.

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    2. I also paid a Canadian lawyer six thousand dollars to get their equivalent of green cards for my kids but he cheated us. Took the money then blew us off.

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  6. I held off getting expats until I saw reviews.
    The reviews came in and they seemed better, even the writing was supposed to be better. I stopped reading at the end of chapter 2. I'll try some other time when I can gloss over the 'where do you stand with your lord and savior' bits. I'm sure there is good information somewhere in it. Even all the Mormons in our group aren't that over the top.
    If I want that kind of religion I'll open my front door, this is Colorado Springs after all.

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  7. That's one of my primary criticisms of his books. He's always trying to work in multiculturalism into the books so Morris Dee will quit hassling him. The religious thing is irritating but I have known people like that and you just have to go with it. Back in the nineties I had some contact with the Christian Identity movement and I damn sure didn't say anything about all their praying and invoking God every time they were making a decision. That would have been seriously bad for my health.

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    1. I've gotta ask, you both knew from reading the previous books that he is/was prone to pushing his Calvinistic religion, yet you both went and got the latest release? Then complain about it.

      Maybe I'm reading both of your comments with a certain amount of bias because I am religiously oriented, but to me it's kind of going and buying an old foreign revolver made out of cheap pot metal knowing that it's going to blow up in your hands the first time you shoot a modern piece of ammo in it. Then when it does you complain about it.





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    2. I didn't buy this one or the last one either. I may eventually, but from reading the first and second, I saw no need to pay full price and be disappointed on the third and fourth.

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    3. Matt, nothing in life is perfect. Rawle's books are entertaining and informative. Personally, I don't find his brand of religious beliefs appealing. They border on being "American Taliban" to me. But I've learned over the years that a lot of the people I share common interests with have some significant differences in outlook and I just work around it.

      When I review a book, I say what I liked about it and what I didn't. If I just lauded the good things, it wouldn't be very useful to the people reading the review.

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    4. I still hope to learn something from any book I get, even if I don't like it, that makes it worthwhile. Based on the reviews I thought it was toned down a lot, but I'm only at the end of chapter 2, so maybe it's better later on.

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  8. I like Rawles, but his writing is less than thrilling....now, Harry you have for this, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3UcQj080Zg. British version of Blackout. Haven't watched it yet but wanted to pass it along.

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    1. Now I know what I will be doing this evening! Thanks for the heads up.

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  9. My husband would like this book a lot.

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    1. Maybe he will take you to Costa Rica to live. We might be neighbors, it's starting to sound better than Palm Coast, Florida.

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  10. I have the Strauss book and like you, enjoyed it. I was surprised to find out how difficult it is to take the steps of becoming an expatriate. The tax laws especially - WOW! I had no idea there was a service charge when you decided to exit the plane - search on the term Expatriation U.S. tax and (as the magician used to say), PREPARE TO BE ASTONISHED!

    I've traveled into the interior of Mexico (Zacatecas, San Miguel De Allende, Guanajuato) years ago - some beautiful country. I don't know how bad the drug cartels have changed this (my trip was nearly 15 years ago). I really loved Zacatecas, poor but my gosh what a beautiful place to be. High desert climate.

    Why is it that the most beautiful landscapes have so many dangers in regards to the government or locals ?

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    1. I guess no where people live is completely free of negative aspects. But there are still nice places to live where your money goes further and there is less government intrusion in your life. There are parts of Mexico which are havens for American expats, and Costa Rica is turning into "old American people" land. But getting yourself out of this country is getting harder and harder as the government tries to stem the flight of citizens to more relaxed locations.

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