“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Saturday, December 7, 2013

You can't tell the players without a program.


I'm sure I confused some folks last night with some of my comments. My two brothers and I have a blog that we use to keep in touch, and I am Redmond Lewis there.   I was reading that blog, came back over here, and didn't change accounts so I showed up here as Redmond Lewis. He is not my evil twin brother. Different names usually help me keep straight about what blog I'm dealing with, but it didn't work last night. Rather than copy the comments I made, then delete them and reenter them as Harry Flashman I am just going to leave them on there as Redmond Lewis.

Redmond Lewis was a social bandit prominent in Appalachia after the Civil War.

Harry Flashman, of course, is the notorious Victorian Army Officer made famous by the series of books which chronicle his adventures from "the earlies" until World War I. If you haven't read George McDonald Frasers books about this fellow,  you might try the first one. His knowledge of history is amazing , the detail in the books is extraordinary, and the main character is the kind of man most men would love to be but never are because they have a conscience and moral values!

12 comments:

  1. Multiple personalities will get your guns taken away under Obummercare :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would be nice to just use your real name, wouldn't it? Some people do that but my experiences with my past two blogs have made me hesitant to do so.

      Now that you mention it, I wonder when I fill out my paperwork on renewing my concealed carry, if I have to say yes to the question about using aliases?

      Nah.

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  2. Hey Harry Flashman,


    (captaincrunch)


    I stumbled across your blog, looks real cool. It reminds me of another blog sometime ago that was really, really good.
    I remember a e-mail conversation with that blogger about Indian 'Isapore rifles chambered in .308 and I am still looking for one of those Isapore rifles. I did score a hex receiver Mosin Nagant (1930 manufacture) in excellent shape for 100 dollars (my first vintage bolt action)
    I had many good conversations with that blogger some time ago via e-mail. I learned a lot from him in my early stages of prepping, survival etc. I hope I can absorb some knowledge from you too.

    (captaincrunch)

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    Replies
    1. Captain Crunch, are you still alive, man! It's been a couple of years, hasn't it? I remember you well from the old Hermit blog. It's really good to hear from you again. If you got your Mosin Nagant you did well, they cost about twice that for a hex receiver now, so your timing was great. Don't be a stranger.

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    2. Harry Flashman,

      (captaincrunch)


      I added you to my coveted list of blogs which includes survivalblog,westernrifleshootersassociation, and a few others.
      'Just out of curiosity, is Kimber still around???

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    3. captain, buddy - yep - i'm still around! nice to see you here!

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    4. It's a small world for sure. Didn't you use to comment on Mayberry's blog and all those folks?
      As for adding to blog rolls, Harry I hope you don't mind but I've added you to mine as well. I couldn't find a "follower" button anywhere and had to resort to the old copy and paste. No matter though, it's done!

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    5. Sci Fi chick,


      (captaincrunch)

      Yeah' I used to comment on mayberry's blog. He started another blog called 'lagunamadrepirate.

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  3. I'd like to read the Harry Flashman books. That was a pretty interesting place and time for sure. Those and The Fall of the Roman Empire are on my list for the next year or so.

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    Replies
    1. Send me an email with an address you are ok with giving out. I have duplicates of some of them you can have. I think, once you read the first one, you will be hard pressed to stop. Some people say the latter books are not as good but I like them all. Fraser was an officer in a Scottish regiment during and just after the war, and his books "McAuslin in the Rought" "The General Danced at Dawn" and a third about his time in the North African desert that I can't remember the name of are classics about being a junior officer.

      Gibbon will either enlighten you or kill you. In the Horation Hornblower series of books, The Fall of the Roman Empire was his favorite reading. Rather daunting thought.

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  4. I wouldn't of even noticed if you didn't point it out.

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    Replies
    1. Well, I have started doing that more and more often, probably it's alzheimers or something, so I thought I'd mention it so people wouldn't wonder what was going on. ;-)

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