“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Survivalist Magazine


Here's the latest issue of Survivalist.   Looks like it was cut out for people like Captain Crunch, who live on the beach.

I haven't gotten my copy yet.  That's pretty typical for Survivalist.   It's a good magazine, but they have a tiny staff. Sometimes you get your magazine, and sometimes you don't.  When you don't,  then you have to call them and ask for it.  When your subscription expires, they don't send you a notice or a renewal form, they just quit sending the magazine.

I called down there once, and the only person in their office was an elderly gentleman who asked if I would mind calling back, as he was just going out the door to pick up his grandson at school .  Didn't bother me any but it certainly indicates they are a small business in every sense of the word. I don't mind that, either.

7 comments:

  1. I think I would skip that issue, just saying. LOL

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    1. I take your point. Coals to Newcastle.

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  2. Harry,


    (captaincrunch)


    Beach Bugout's is something I put a lot of thought into and so have many other locals. Down here we are allowed "floating cabins" on some of the salt water lagoons and waterways between Padre Island and the mainland. Floating cabins float on blocks of Styrofoam and have generators,etc, but you need a boat and a constant source of fuel for the boat. If a hurricane comes in, you may be in deep doo doo.

    Another thing down here we have are cabins on some of the islands that are near Padre Island. I don't know all the complex in's and out's of land ownership on thease environmentaly sensitive islands, but I heard of a guy that had what some called "rare birds" roost on his island and he was worried that Texas Parks and Wildlife would shut him down so he trapped a raccoon from his ranch and dropped it off on the island that his cabin was on, so it could eat the egg's and run the birds off.
    An environmentaly friendly solution you could say:)

    The best bug out on water would be a yacht of some sort, maybe a 30 footer or longer with a water maker, diesel engine, etc. That's the safest way to go and the most cost effective.

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    Replies
    1. Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      what I ment for a yacht would be a sailboat.

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    2. I'm partial to houseboats, but they are only good for large inland lakes, or the intracoastal waterway. I lived on one for a week to check out the idea, and it seemed to be perfectly self contained, ideal in just about every way. They can't handle waves though, so they have to be in protected locations.

      A large sailboat would be good, provided you knew a storm was coming in time to get out of the area. In a collapse situation, seems like you might get caught on the proverbial lee shore because you might not have enough warning to get clear. There's a downside to everything though. Fishing shacks off the coast of Florida used to be really common, but I think the government has shut most of them down. Miami had a "stiltsville" with cottages built on stilts offshore, but I don't know if it still exists or not.

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  3. I did some bay fishing on the Texas intracoastal many years ago, those cabins on the water are awesome places to crash. Anyone approaching could be seen for quite a distance, unless they plan to come there by snorkling for a loooong way, lol. Just a structure on piers built above water, very cool indeed.

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    Replies
    1. I bought the magazine last night and caught a very interesting idea from one of the articles - solar distillation from a plastic water bottle to another. Two bottles - pierce and connect the two caps with a length of plastic tubing (Aquarium hose?), and fill one bottle to 3/4" capacity with salt water and leave in full sun. The other bottle to be left in shade (i.e. cooled area) and allow the water vapor to travel to it and condense to sweet water.

      Not sure if that works, but I'm agonna give that one a try, saline ground water is a problem where we live and this might be a possible solution. This idea alone was worth the purchase price.

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