“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Saturday, April 5, 2014

Super Volcano

KMSP-TV There's been a lot on the news the last few days about Yellowstone. First the string of earthquakes in Southern California, then in South and Central America. Increasing "Tremor swarms" and some uplift at Yellowstone. I'm glad I don't live out that way.

 If you have never seen it, there's a Discovery Channel movie called Super Volcano that is good. It's out on DVD, and most libraries either have it or can get it for you. It sticks pretty much to the facts, and is really a dramatization of what scientists know, or think they know, about super volcano events.

 There's also a National Geographic hour long program called When Yellowstone Erupts. It shows up from time to time and is probably available for viewing on the internet.  It's a documentary, well done and interesting without being overly dramatic.



15 comments:

  1. I think I would put more faith in the instincts of animals than I would in the opinions of experts. Animals don't have a political agenda and nobody pays them for their opinions or actions.

    And if I saw a herd of buffalo all running in the same direction, I believe it would be in my best interest to be right behind them.

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    1. Vicki, I am waiting with great interest to see if there is any sort of event out there. They say the buffalo are leaving to go to lower areas to eat, but they have never, to my knowledge, run down the road in herds. One thing I do know, the louder the politicians and government employees yell that all is well, the faster I would flee.

      We had earthquakes in Naples, Italy all the time when my wife and I lived there. I found it frightening, because Vesuvius sits right across the bay. But nothing horrific ever happened, other than cracked tufa stone walls in our little villa. The scientists say Vesuvius will erupt again and when it does it will be cataclysmic. Yellowstone is kind of like that, when it goes we are all in deep kimchi. I just hope it holds off til my family is long gone.

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  2. Reckon when Ol' Yella erupts it will impact lives worldwide - especially those in the Northern Hemisphere.

    Also don't fancy experiencing that - neither the eruption nor the dust cloud.

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    1. with the way my luck has been running lately I would not be surprised if it did blow up, Dani. I've seen other maps that show the ash getting all the way here. The ash and sulphur from a super volcano eruption would certainly make it very tough on people all over the world. It's like the old Chinese curse, "may you live in interesting times."

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  3. It's about a 50/50 crap shoot at my location. Some maps show the secondary ash as extending to maybe where I am at while some show it stopping 100 miles or so West of me. Not that it matters if an eruption happened that spread ash to the maximum it would more than likely kill the entire world eventually. I have never seen anyone mention actually finding ash from Yellowstone this far East from previous eruptions so who knows?

    Maybe a Yellowstone eruption would set off a New Madrid quake as well?

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    1. I had a really good program from The History Channel on an excavation of a river valley where there was a huge deposit of ancient mammal fossils. The animals had died from breathing in the ash of a Yellowstone super eruption. It was located in one of the Midwest states but I can't remember which one. I deleted the program when I needed space on my DVR but now I am trying to find the show on disk. I don't think that I have ever read of a previous link between a super volcano event and the New Madrid fault but that doesn't mean it is implausible.

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  4. The lucky ones get killed in the blast. Then the survivors in the northern hemisphere get 100+ years of crop failures due to cold temperatures. And maybe, a surprise nuclear attack by Russia and China, because probably 75% of our nuclear weapons will be buried under ash.

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    1. That's possible. Most of what I've seen projects a "nuclear winter" of about six years, after which there would be sunshine again and it would warm. Since the event would be global in terms of cooling and crop failure, I would hope that even human beings would have enough common sense not to unleash a further disaster on humanity. Of course, there are plenty of examples in human history that would not support that supposition.

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  5. I guess you never really know. I haven't seen the film.

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    1. If you can get it through your library, it's worth the trouble. You never really do know.

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  6. I am more worried about the Nuclear power plant north of my place then a volcano out west.

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    1. Either one can do you in, given the right circumstances. If I had to choose, I'd rather a nuc plant blew up than a super caldera.

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  7. We're just outside of the danger zone but like Anon said, then we're in big trouble!

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  8. That type of event in southeast asia thinned out the human race considerably 75,000 years ago. Some scientists think that there may have only been a few thousand people left. I think it was the Tambora caldera that blew but I should check.

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  9. I was mistaken. It was mount Toba. See the Wiki entry entitled Toba catastrophe theory for the details.

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