“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Saturday, July 5, 2014

Around and about.



Times are still tough up here for a lot of people.  The churches sponsor food give a ways once a month. One church hosts the event, and the others contribute.  I have driven by there when it was going on, and the numbers of people who come are amazing.  I don't think the improvement the television is always touting, with the cheerful government numbers, has reached here yet. If it has reached anywhere at all.




I was out driving around on back roads and passed this place.  The fellow is up here part of the time, and somewhere else part of the time. My guess is he works in the city and comes up here two or three days a week.  He has a big garden.  He built that little building not too long ago. The top is living quarters, the bottom is a shop. It's about 800 square feet.   His place is way, way back in the mountains, so I guess it's safe for him to leave his rotor tiller and tractor out there.









Another place I think is interesting is this one.  It's a small house, immaculately maintained. The old couple that live there are in their late eighties, but she works in the garden and he keeps the pasture mowed. You can't really see it but he has a nice big fish pond and a dock right behind the house.





He keeps about 15 acres in hay.  That's a big cash crop here, and everyone is harvesting the hay fields here now.  You have to get it baled and inside before it gets wet.  That's been tough to do this summer.


Yesterday this field was full of big round bales of hay. Today they drove an 18 wheeler down into the field and loaded it all up for shipment.  No telling where it will wind up, some hay grown here goes to the mid-west, or even Wyoming, the Dakotas, or Montana.


Now that the hay is cut, the fields will be full of dove and quail.  It's not bird season so they'll be able to forage safely for the time being.


This is the typical county road here.  Gravel, really just one lane. Not very well maintained. This is in much better shape than the county road that leads to my trail up the mountain. The delivery services won't even come up our county road anymore.

But at least that keeps the touristas in their new four wheel drives away.  Maybe it will keep the Hispanic drug dealers out of my neck of the woods, but I doubt it.

14 comments:

  1. A number of years ago there were food giveaways in my area, but I haven't seen any advertised for a long time. I think folks are having a hard time feeding their families and haven't anything left to be able to donate.
    I've been in nearly every state in the lower 48, but mostly by freeway. I love seeing what the country looks like from the back roads. Thanks for taking us along on your drive.

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    1. There are a lot of very, very poor people in Appalachia. They've been pushed into the background as more affluent people arrived from other places. Many of them lost their land because property values rose and they couldn't pay their taxes. Work is almost nonexistent. You have to do what I did, and drive for hours each day, or you just have to have a retirement income. All the young people leave, just as my kids did.

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  2. One of the things I liked about where I live is the relatively steep and rough roads needed to get here. The hope then was that it would keep the liberal high-tax-supporting Marylanders and Northern Virginians from moving here, since we are technically in what's known as Washington DC's western "commuter corridor".

    It worked well for a while, but alas, when the bottom dropped out of the housing market, our area became a magnet for another sort of pest--the unemployed renter guy who always seems to have enough money for a mufflerless ATV and gas enough to race it on our roads 24/7 despite our laws to the contrary.

    As for churches and charity, that was how it was always supposed to work, but the government hates competition and welfare is something that they jealously guard as their own fiefdom. After all, if you help people out of poverty, then you can't use them to justify all of the huge social services programs that now employ so many.

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    1. Strange you mention the government and it's attitude towards "helping" people. The feds used to give the state big truck loads of block cheese, which they had purchased as part of their subsidy of the dairy industry. About once a month, the cheese was given out gratis to the needy, from the back of a big truck on the town square.

      Then the illegal aliens got the word, and they would come over to our county from the one they took over. Since they had no i.d. the state couldn't refuse to give them the food, and the crowds of illegals just shouldered the local poor out of the way. When the county government complained about the food going to illegal aliens, and not citizens, the feds just quit giving it to the state for distribution here. Solved that problem. There credo is "my way or the highway."

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    2. Yeah, we've seen that here with illegals in our local fishing areas. They come from Virginia in huge groups and they drink and leave garbage and dirty diapers all over the place. When it was just locals fishing there, the local DNR officers were a constant presence, checking fishing licenses and enforcing other ordinances. But once the illegals got to be a large bloc of the park users, it got to be a political problem because they don't bother buying fishing licenses or having licenses to operate the cars that they drive here in and once the DNR officers started issuing citations and making arrests that brought these folks to the attention of ICE, pressure came down from above and all DNR enforcement stopped along the river. Ironically, the capper was a big gang sweep that netted several MS-13 members who were using our parks as their hang-outs, complete with wives and kids. When the local Democrats found out that ICE and the Sheriff worked together on that sweep, they forced the sheriff to stop working with ICE. Today, two formerly very nice sections of our river parks are now pretty much "Little el Salvador" and "Little Mexico" (because even the illegals segregate) and us county taxpayers get stuck with the clean-up of mountains of trash every Monday the likes of which you never see along the rest of the river anywhere else.

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    3. I worked at a state park one summer on one of those "senior citizen" programs. Big groups of illegal aliens would come from Gainesville, Ga. You'd get 40 or more of them having a big party. As in what you saw, the women change kids diapers and just throw them on the ground. They toss garbage in the lake and the stream, when trashcans are right there at the tables. None of them paid the "honor system" $5.00 per car.
      They ran off everybody else who had come to the park with their racket and their behavior. The Rangers would go down there and they'd be quiet just long enough for the law enforcement to leave, then start all over again.

      We get to pay their hospital bills, too. They don't pay anything, and to recoup it's loses, the hospital inflates the bills on people who have insurance.

      They completely clog the educational system. If you already have a class load over the legal limit, and you get six or seven kids who speak not one word of English, then you're told you have to spend two or more hours a day of class time working solely with the Spanish speakers while the other kids do busy work, what can you do?

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  3. Funny how the government wants to help the illegals and turn their backs on us citizens. Oh wait the illegals will vote for them, what was I thinking???? I enjoy country living its so quite.

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    1. Rob, people on the bottom of the totem pole almost never vote here. I don't know why, but it's true. And, knowing that, the powers that be in the county simply disregard them. Our county government built a "fine arts center" at a cost of several million dollars. Why did we need that? But it looks good on paper, it pleases the half way backs, and the Commissioner can point to it and say "look what I did."

      Yes, living out in the country is very quiet and peaceful. It's a big plus.

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  4. The farmers have been having flooding issues here. It's so crazy there's either floods, or droughts. I'd love it if someone would come up with something that hangs onto water during the flooded times, and have it for when it's a drought.

    We're constantly moving coal around, why not water? I'm pretty sure Arizona, or California could use some of Nebraska and Iowa's water right about now.

    I just think we have to think about the future of what could come more.

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    1. Water is going to be an increasing problem for California, Nevada, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and other states. I did actually read an article which proposed building a pipe line from the Great Lakes to the Southwest. Not practical, but it shows the degree of desperation starting to materialize.

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  5. Hey Harry,


    (captaincrunch)

    speaking about how bad the economy really is. The toilet paper I buy "Scott Tissue" (the closest thing to mil-spec, Navy Rough and Ready toilet paper I can has shrunk their rolls down about one-eighth, or one half of an inch (that's a lot of real estate)
    That's the 'hidden inflation" right there.

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  6. There have been lots of examples of that kind of thing in the last few years. Decrease the amount of product, while trying to make it unnoticeable. It's dishonest but compared to market share businesses don't care about that. Coffee is the most egregious example I've seen of the practice.

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  7. Another thing that I found annoying is they speak great English when they want to, and then they claim to no speak or understand English. In Florida the Latino's what you to speak Spanish. Sooo many times at Walmart you would ask an employee a question and you got the deer in the headlight look. We stopped at a Walmart right after we got back into MN, the first thing we noticed was all the white employees who spoke English. LOL.

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    1. That's a factor here as well. Not just at Walmart, but anywhere . Try explaining to someone at home depot you need a gasket for a dishwasher when they speak no English. I speak Spanish fairly well and it was still a trial, because the guy just wanted me to go to away so he could go on visiting with his pals.

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