“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Samozaryadnaya Vintovka Tokareva, Obrazets 1940 goda

I have two SVT 40 rifles.  Today while the weather was perfect I took one out of the back of a safe and gave it a work out.


I don't have all the accoutrements shown here but I thought this was a great picture.

The SVT 40's tend to stay in the safes for a reason. They have a reputation for breaking parts, to start with. Since they are in the seventy year old plus range, parts for repairs are not easy to acquire.



The SVT 40 is a good shooter. The rifle is long and a bit heavy, but it's elegant in it's way.  The magazine isn't designed to be removed and replaced in action. Rather, it's reloaded with stripper clips. Most shooters today don't like stripper clips because they're used to just dropping the empty mag out of the weapon and popping another full magazine into a weapon. If you practise a bit with stripper clips you can get pretty proficient and it becomes second nature.


The SVT 40 uses the same stripper clips utilized by the Mosin Nagant rifle. They aren't hard to find or expensive.

The SVT 40 is relatively difficult to field strip for cleaning , so I only fire brass cased commercial ammo or my own reloads.  Soft steel cases can cause extraction difficulties and all surplus ammo has to be regarded as corrosive. That bothers me not at all with a bolt gun , cleaning is relatively easy. But cleaning is not easy with the SVT 40.


I like these rifles for my purposes.  I'm not going to be operating them in the forest, where their weight and length would factor in. I'm going to be cleaning them at the bench in my shop and not in the field. They can reach out and touch someone way out there, and the 7.62 x 54r is a full power battle round.


12 comments:

  1. Man, I remember when SOG, J&G, and all the usual suspects were bringing these things in and they were just a couple hundred bucks. Now you can't touch them for anything south of $600.

    Interesting guns. Which reminds me, in case youre not aware of it, there's an awesome site, http://www.forgottenweapons.com/, dedicated to the odd military stuff. The videos of some truly rare stuff are very cool.

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    1. I am always staggered at the price of surplus weapons today. I bought most of my collection in the 1980's and 1990's. The selection was vast and it was not particularly expensive. Those happy times are gone forevermore.

      I appreciate the tip on that site.

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  2. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Yeah' that rifles a beast like my Mosin.

    Them's Russkie rifles are built to last and millions of dead Germans will attest to their effectiveness.

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    1. They are good weapons. The Russian bolt guns are sturdy, functional and workmanlike. The SVT rifles were very popular with both the Germans and the Finns, who were better able to maintain them in the field than the Russians. In Soviet service they were issued to Marines, Guards units, and NCO' s.

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  3. Geznunheit! :^)

    Wow, and I thought the Hakim looked long, that one beats it in length I think. Its a long drink of water. Thank you for the information about it, its a rare animal. Man, I miss the late 1980's / early '90's surplus firearm imports, the prices were unbelievable.

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    1. Those were the good old days. The great golden age was the 1950's, if you look at old trade magazines the prices are beyond belief. Of course, money bought more. In the 1950's my dad's salary as a high school teacher was $6000 a year, and he bought our first house, on a one acre lot, for $22,000.

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  4. It's good you have found something you like.

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    1. Everbody needs some kind of hobby for relaxation, and especially when you are retired. The days can be long.

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  5. Those were an interesting footnote in history. The Soviet Garand if you will. If I was going to get a semi auto rifle in x54R it would be a Druganov SVD type rifle. Mostly for detachable box mags.

    Recently with the variety of AK imports I have toyed with getting a VEPR/ Siaga which is pretty much a modern Druganov in x54R just for the cheap ammo. However it would be another caliber and I abhor doing that on general principle. Also it would fail my commonality rules.

    I think next year my gun purchase will be some sort of a semi auto .308. Probably a PTR-91 though I am interested in seeing where the AR-10 market goes. A semi auto .308 can put big holes in things like small trees or cars and hit with authority at distance. One could make a case for a semi auto .308 with a moderate power scope like say a 2.5-10 as a do everything rifle.

    Then again in Louisiana I have to be on a roof, facing strait down a road or pipeline to find something I can't hit with an iron sighted AK.

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    1. They've very attractive rifles. I don't have a Dragunov. The Russians one's were banned from Importation under Clinton, and the Chinese rifles at some point as well. I remember the Chinese "Tiger" version being available at reasonable prices but it was not within the scope of my interests at that time, so I didn't get one. Like the Uzi, it's a boat I missed. In retrospect, I should have bought one of each of those weapons when I could.

      I have limited sight distances here, as well. Although I have good vistas of the mountains, open spaces that would be within range of a rifle are not common here and other than the meadow I cleared years ago, the woods come right up to the house.

      I'm not short of semi-auto rifles because during the Clinton Regime I bought FAL's, G-3's, civilian versions of the M14, and some clones of all. I hardly ever shoot them. I have the two AR-15's, don't shoot those much either. But I have them against a future day of need.

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  6. I notice the Tokerevs look externally a lot like SKSs. Any similarity?
    I have never held a tok, so have no experience with them...

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  7. J, the two rifles were from different designers but I am sure that lessons learned from the SVT series were certainly applied during the design workup of the latter SKS.

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