“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Sunday, April 5, 2015

U.S.Drought Monitor Site

Link to U . S. Drought Monitor Site

Lots of information that you can search and format to suit your own interests.

26 comments:

  1. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    we had a drought down here but it pretty much ended. The people in California are in a world of hurt though.

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  2. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Check this one out.......

    http://victoriatx.craigslist.org/ele/4954867816.html

    Its a Eagle SSB CB radio, tube type from the 1970's.

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  3. I know that the situation in California is grim with no relief in sight. My mother just moved from Sacramento to Oregon and the long term drought was part of her motivation for doing so. I've always been interested in the Anaszazi culture of the Southwest. I don't think that there is any doubt it was a severe drought that destroyed that civilization.

    I will take a look at the link. I have no problem with tub technology, although finding replacement parts now would be extremely difficult.

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    1. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      One of my neighbors (and a close friend) who passed away years ago had a real nice 10 meter radio setup. I should have made an offer on it before he died but the relative that got his radio (and the rest of his stuff after he passed away) was a full on piece of white trash that could not be reasoned with on any level.
      On a sidenote that house that my friend and neighbor resided in now stands abandoned and is worth about $80.000 and none of his relatives has the money to pay the back taxes (about $16.000)

      On the drought thing. I really don't have any symphathy for them. They live in a semi-arid, desert type climate to begin with and the vast majority of people have to have swimming pools, manicured lawns, car washing.

      I feel sorry for the average person that already has been conserving water and is just trying to live. Those people and the farmers and ranchers are the real victims of the drought.

      As per the Anaszazi, drought sounds like the most likely culprit.

      If the Anaszazi would have developed water saving technologies, water wells for irrigation kept their population from expanding. The Anaszazi could have done well for hundreds of years (or at least until the Spaniards arrived)

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  4. Witg the drought in california I can't believe the government hasn't put more sanctions in place to try to help the situation. Here there would be hosepipe band and water saving things in place.

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  5. California's politicians are primarily concerned with getting reelected so they pander to the electorate. Water restrictions are unpopular , especially with the rich left wingers who populate San Francisco, L.A., etc. Those folks have to have their swimming pools and expansive lawns and landscaping. The government in California has waited way too late to do anything effective.

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  6. Looks like Oregon is going to be Kalifornicated even more. Time to move to Idaho.

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    1. I'm sure that more Californians will head to Oregon as the drought continues. However, they'll be going to the coast, especially to the cities. I think that the people in the high desert should be ok in that respect.

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    2. Except that we are in the red drought area, also. Not only that, more Californians mean more liberals and their agenda,.....as if it weren't bad enough here already.

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    3. We had a similar sitution with people from Florida. It wasn't the political issues that caused changes here. It was the way they wanted to spend tax money. We built a big park with a bike trail for kids, but the Seniors from Florida didn't want kids riding skate boards and bikes on the trail. So they went to the commisioners meeting, raised hell, and got bikes and skate boards banned. People who used to walk their dogs by the river there suddenly found that dogs were banned, because the Floridians didn't like dogs "pooping" on the grass. To placate the dog people, the county built a "dog park" where your dogs could run free. The trouble was, it was just a little tiny square of land with a chain link fence around it, out in the boiling sun. No one uses it.

      We now have a beautiful golf course, which the retirees from Florida play on, we have a "fine arts center" where they can paint and do whatever one does in a fine arts center. We have a massive and lavish senior citizens center in place of the older but functional one we had. I suppose it's out fault, because almost nobody ever goes to the commissioners meetings except the out of town senior crowd, and they get their way. They have certainly changed this part of North Georgia, and a lot of money gets spent in ways that don't benefit anyone but the retired crowd with money.

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  7. Thanks Mr. Flashman. In our area, a lot more rain this year than last by a long shot, thank God - two straight years of drought really hit our local wild animal populations hard.

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    1. We had a drought here in the late 80's that was bad. For me, the springs drying up and the creek getting low weren't the worst aspect of it, because my well stayed good. It was the forest fires. The whole county is heavily forrested, and everything was tinder dry. No fires were allowed, but local people would go right ahead and burn the trash, the wind would whip pieces of burning paper out of the burn barrel, and the woods would catch. People from the city would still build camp fires, embers would get out of the fire ring, and the woods would burn. We had several bad fires and one that came really close to my place. Only the borate bomber aircraft kept it from jumping the creek and coming up my way.

      It's good you have had some rain. It's rainng here now as I write this and I realize I shouldn't complain so much about it being damp and dreary. That beats the alternative.

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  8. I have to question that map. Except for "down-east" (north east) it paints all of Maine in yellow indicating "abnormally dry", but most of that area shown in yellow is still covered in at least four feet of snow. Lakes are still frozen over and folks are still ice fishing which is unusual this late in the season. Rivers are at flood stage due to unusually high snow fall. And down here in southern Maine also depicted in yellow on the map we have had quite a bit of rain and my basement sump pump is cycling every 15 minutes putting out 25 gallons each time.

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    1. I think it looks at aggragate totals but I'm not sure Michael. Probably best to contact the university guys that publish it, they would know.

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  9. I've been reading that many farmers in California just aren't planting their usual crops this year due to the lack of water. I wonder how long it will take before store prices on produce go higher than they are now, considering how much of it is shipped in from the west. Here we are going to be looking to buy locally as much as possible. I'm glad we have several thriving Farmers Markets.

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    1. Vicki, that's been much in the news lately. The consensus of the talking heads is that meat and vegetables are going to go up a lot. The governor of California, a strange character worth study in his own right, recently imposed draconian water conservation measures, but exclused agriculture from the edict. He said that California provides so much of the food shipped to the rest of the country that he exempted them least water restrictions cause loss of crops and economic problems for the whole country. Yet the same news segment said that lots of farmers are simply selling their water allotments to cities and towns, which they are allowed by the law to do, and they make more money by doing that than they do by farming.

      I saw a program on this drought on one of the documentary channels. The farmers were plowing down whole almond orchards of healthy trees because the trees needed too much water. They were also drilling deeper and deeper in to the aquafer there, pumping out more and more water. That particular aquafer, which goes all the way up to Colorado, is not renewable in terms of human times lines. Once the water is gone, it's gone.

      We have plenty of water here , for now, and we too have a good farmers market sponsored by the county. But I think the weather is changing, (I'm not touting climate change the political version) and I don't know what's coming. What I do know is that our summers are longers, more humid, and our winters are colder and drier.

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  10. Harry,

    I see western Oklahoma hit's the charts again.
    We always have drought issues.........

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    1. Oklahoma and drought. Just the combination of the two words in the same sentence raises the hair on my neck. I think of Steinbeck and "The Grapes of Wrath." Hope you and your husband don't have to load up and head to California in a dust bowl. I guess it wouldn't help now anyone, as California is burning up.

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  11. It seems like one year it's a drought, then the next it's flooding. I wish they'd find a better way to reserve more water for the years it's flooded. Then the water could be used for years of drought.

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    1. The Anasazi did that, they built all manner of water control features around Chaco canyon, but in the end it wasn't enough. The collapse was very ugly, right down to cannibalism. I look at the pictures of California and I remember a book by a professor named Diamond who predicted just this. History Channel made a documentry of it, and I remember buying the DVD. I'll have to dig it out and watch it again. I think something could have been done if California had reacted to the drought early on, but I think now it's too late.

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  12. I wonder what John Muir would think of what Modern Californians have done to the state he loved. His writings about Lake Tuli [now long dry] described an eden with waterfowl, elk and all sorts of wildlife and lush grass. We also have to remember Lake Mead in Nevada,....it was built and the water use planned when the area had seen a number of years of higher than normal rain and snow. Then the population grows and flocks to an area were left to normal moisture would not have been so heavily populated. Modern society uses so much water in such incredibly wasteful ways. Maybe this will be the wake up call California needs?

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    1. Fiona, I think people will just ignore the entire thing until it effects them personally. I just read a news article that highlighted the fact of continuing water waste in the upscale areas of L.A. and San Francisco. Just a few days after the governor's big speech water was cascading down driveways and into the gutter from wealthy parts of the cities. It's only in the towns of Southern California that now have no tap water at all that the problem seems real. Most people just ignore bad portents and hope things will just continue on.

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  13. Las Vegas is hurting big time also. Look at recent pictures of Lake Mead. It's one reason I had to get out of there years ago. But those hotels just keep being built. Greed will get you in the end I guess.

    I have a sister in Sacramento, I have been trying to get her to leave for years. She has little ones at home so that worries me. I suppose it will take a black swan event to wake her up. --Troy

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    1. Troy, lots of the cities in the Southwest are in the same boat. Water is becoming a scarce commodity but people just go on behaving as if there were no problem at all. We have been trying to get my mother out of Sacramento for years. It's a vast relief that she finally listened to reason.

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  14. Kind of crazy how we've been flooding here in Florida - almost to the same point it was back in 04 after all those hurricanes. I guess there's pros and cons to all locations.

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  15. That will mean a bumper crop of mosquitoes.

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