“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Sunday, May 17, 2015




When I say that I quit teaching in public schools because I could not be part of their agenda, this is the kind of thing I was talking about. It's why my wife and I home schooled our children.

10 comments:

  1. Talk about making my skin crawl. This it the crap I was referring to the other day when I mentioned the notion of tribalizing people into little conquerable groups with jingoistic prepositions. All the more perverted when they pervert adolescents using sex to do it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know why the higher echelons of education are controlled by the kind of people that would do things like this, but in my experience, at both state and federal level, teaching basic skills like reading, writing and math are sacrificed to divert the time to social agendas. I was frequently required to simply omit basic subjects in order to teach "black history" , or "inclusiveness" or "sensitivity to other cultures" and I taught fifth graders. Ask any teacher you know and they'll tell you this is true if they are not afraid you'll repeat it and they'll lose their jobs. When I tried to get teachers to agree to go to the administration at my school about this as a group, only one other person agreed. The others, not unreasonably, pointed out that doing so would not change anything, would certainly result in adverse teacher evaluations, and they needed to make it to retirement. I never met a teacher who was not desperate to get out of teaching and retire. Teacher attrition within the first three years is astronomical as many can't stomach being used this way, but after you have ten years or so in, you begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel and I suspect many would teach National Socialism or Communism out of a sense of survival.

      Delete
  2. I fear for my grandchildren. I was concerned about the teaching using Common Core standards, but this is a whole different kind of evil. I know that my grandchildren are being raised by parents who are grounded in the importance of family and the belief in the Christian values of our forefathers. I can only hope they are smart enough to question and not accept what will be taught at face value, and will cling to the teaching of their parents. I wish they could be home schooled, but that's not going to happen. What a mess!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unless someone in the school system takes a huge risk and passes the word to the parents, most of the time parents are not aware anything of this nature is going on. At my school we had an assembly that was supposed to be about fund raising. Instead, it turned out to be a presentation by homosexuals about their lifestyle. No one in the classroom knew this until it was underway. At that point, the vice principal told me to go up and dance with one of the presenters on the stage. I was the only male teacher in the school. I refused. She sent another teacher telling me I was required to do this. I told that teacher to tell the Vice Principal that "I was not dancing with another man, and if she told me to stick a feather up my a** I would not do that either."

      The next day the fifth grade teachers had a little party on the hall after school and they all wore a feather taped to their behinds. I never heard any more about the incident.

      The strangest thing is that I personally don't care a damn about which way a person goes on this. I care that they are reliable, loyal, competent and that they stick with you when the going gets tough. I flew with some pilots who were "gay" but in every other respect were just regular pilots. No one I can remember cared what you did off duty as long as you held up your part of the work load.

      What I objected to was that this is an issue for parents to teach their children, and each family should deal with it on their own. It sure isn't a good thing when an elitist cult outside the family begins programming moral values into young children.

      I know that my personal take on this broader issue is not one that everybody would share who comes here, but everyone develops their own views based on their own experiences I guess.

      Delete
    2. Harry, I personally have no problem with the sexual orientation of others. I have both friends and relatives who are of a different persuasion than me. I have always felt that what a person does in private has no bearing on my opinion of that person. I am more apt to dismiss a mean, hateful person from my life than to judge someone for their sexual behavior. None of my business.

      However, when it comes to the indoctrination of children, especially when it has to do with this type of subject, I think it is just wrong. Kids are confused enough with the process of growing up. And then to really throw a monkey wrench into the works, having these ideas tossed at them on top of the normal growing up problems, can do no possible good at all. Many, like my grandchildren, are taught a set of values at home and at church. Then they go to school only to be told that what they learned from their parents and from their religion should be discounted. If government is trying to ruin a society, they could find no better way to do it. At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist, I think that's exactly what is happening. Get the kids when they are young, and you will have disciples for life. Kind of makes me feel sick.

      Delete
    3. Vicki, those are my sentiments exactly. I am vehemently opposed to public institutions being used to further a specific groups political and social agenda. A school is to learn basic skills that enable an individual to function adequately in their society. Not to teach them what to think on philosophical and moral issues. Both the Nazi's in the past and the Moslems today with their madrassas adopted the practice of using schools to mold minds and we all know how well that worked and is working today.

      I may have dwelt on the "orientation" thing too much in my comment, but it would have been easy for readers to misunderstand my point otherwise.

      Delete
  3. We complain about school a lot with that. We do send our kids to school, but we teach them a lot at home. My husband teaches them science a lot. We notice they lack in science experiments, and being able to explain why things do what they do. I work with the kids a lot on arts and crafts. Art is being pulled a lot in schools. Some may not think it's important, but I think it exercises that creative side of their brain. Our kids have workbooks on critical thinking, and math. Our oldest reads a lot, but we can't get our youngest interested in reading much yet. He'll get there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Art and music classes were the first things eliminated here in 2008 when the state budget collapsed. There was never much support for them since the majority of parents viewed those subjects as a waste of time. Yet at the same period of financial catastrophe , budgets for high school athletics were increased. I guess it just depends on your perspective.

      We bought our kids curriculum from Texas Tech University's outreach program. We supplemented that by working with the kids on their lessons once we got home. And we made every effort to provide "enriching experiences" as I know you, Lisa, and others who have small kids do as well.

      We did not find out our son was dyslexic until he was a fifth grader. Once we discovered that, my wife went to the Linda Mood Bell school in Nashville to take a course in teaching dyslexics to read. My son had a much easier time after that.

      Delete
  4. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Don't know what else to add to this discussion. Its all been said.

    I look at it from a basic logic statement based on evolution.

    Female and female cannot reproduce offspring. Male and male cannot reproduce offspring.
    Male and female can only reproduce offspring. Therefore the first two arguments go against evolution and nature and are invalid.

    That being said as libertarian as I am I don't care what a person does on their off time as long as they leave me and my property alone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, you know I'm not religious and so this particular issue doesn't weigh heavily on my shoulders. I've got more important things to worry about . Like you, I primarily want to be left in peace.

      Delete