“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Full moon


Went out to look at the full moon tonight. Pretty spectacular.  Hot outside, even though it's just past eleven. Humid as well.

I fired Twenty one rounds of 8 MM Mauser yesterday. Didn't wear a shooting jacket because I wanted to simulate a situation in which I just picked up the rifle and fired it.

I think next time I'll wield a sword.





I have some nice katana I bought back from Japan in 1980. They don't have the range but they don't leave you feeling like you got hit by a truck either!

My shoulder looks like I have the Black Death, it's all mottled. I considered taking a picture of it to show what a full powered battle rifle can do through a thin shirt, but that seems course.



Suffice it to say you had to be a man to handle the weapons of World War II. (Ok. Or a pretty tough woman, if you were a Russian sniper of that persuasion.)

40 comments:

  1. My wife tried to take a pic of the moon last night but it didn't turn out. Shooting always makes some folks feel better.

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    1. I don't have a camera that will do that kind of photography either. One day I'll get one.

      I don't shoot as often as I want to but at least when the mood comes on me I can blast away off the porch or go out behind the shop to my home made range.

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  2. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)


    Now you know why I am considering a muzzle break for the Mosin.

    Breaking News.....

    I picked up that Springfield XDS .45, four inch barrel (gently used) maybe 20 rounds ran through it (if that)
    Heres the list....

    pistol
    five mags, two seven rounders, three six rounders
    Three mag extensions.
    mag holder and other misc. stuff
    20 rounds of .45 hollow point.

    Price, $490

    This pistol brand new is $599 retail, I think.
    extra mags are $40 each.

    I don't know why the previous owner sold it to the gun store I bought it from, but his loss is my gain. This pistol is truly brand new. Not one scratch and no wear.

    I estimate if I got all this brand new it would have cost maybe close too $700.

    I will take it to the range maybe Friday or this weekend. I fired an XD .45 before so I know what to expect. The kick will be a little more than a standard fullsize 1911 because the XDS weighs only 21 onces I think. Its still manageable with practice.

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    1. Sounds like a nice addition to your equipment. Now, as the crack head hordes eddy and swirl around Festung Crunch and your hex receiver Mosin runs dry you can out with your trusty pistol and continue to slay.

      It seems to me that you got an excellent deal. Buying a low mileage pistol is good, you save money and lose nothing.

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  3. You reminded me of a time, at about 12 years of age, when I pestered my Dad to let me shoot his shotgun. He finally relented, just to shut me up, probably. He took me out back to an open field, showed me how to load it and let me fire. Set me down on the ground, it did. Shoulder was purple for nearly a week. Found out I didn't know as much as I thought I did. After I healed, he took me out again and showed me how to stand, how to hold the gun, etc. I have never forgotten that lesson.

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    1. Your old man was hard core. That sounds like something my father would have done. I'm glad you didn't break your shoulder. I don't handle heavy recoil at 63 as well as I did at 30.

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    2. My dad did something similar. My older cousin was becoming something of a real juvenile delinquent. He must have been about 13. He began showing less than noble signs of interest in firearms. My aunt asked my dad to give him a "lesson" to dissuade his burgeoning curiosity.

      Dad loaded the 12 gauge Winchester 101 with a heavy bird load, took cousin out into the back yard and let him fire it. Knocked him loopy and nearly busted his shoulder. Cousin never showed an interest in guns again to this day 40 years later. He thanks my dad for that every time the subject comes up.

      My favorite shoulder massager is my Mosin M44. That lights up the whole area at night. Talk about recoil and a fireball.

      -Unbreakable AZ

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    3. AZ, I like the Mosin M44. For a long time, those things were just floating out there on the market and people didn't buy them. Then, all of a sudden, they just took off. One fellow told me it was because there are so many different M44 rifles from different countries that people started collecting them. But of course, as soon as that happened they weren't cheap any more.

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  4. G'day Harry,

    I don't know what it is about the Mauser, I agree it kicks like a mule and it is not pleasant to shoot in my opinion. I suspect the shape of the stock has a lot to do with it along with the gruntiness of the cartridge. I have shot the 8mm version and I had an Israeli Mauser in 7.62 and traded it as soon as I could!

    Funny thing is I can shoot my Enfields all day, when I first started target shooting it was common to go through 60 rounds in an afternoon and all I felt was a bit stiff that night, another reason I am a committed .303 man.

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    1. The worst rifle I know of for kick is the little Austrian M1895 carbine. Short, light , fires a monstrous 8X56R round. The Mauser and the Mosin both give you a good jolt. The Enfield is not as tough on the shoulder but it's still a full powered round. I'm no feather weight but I don't have the upper body muscle tissue I used to have. Airsoft is looking better and better!

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  5. Wow. So what you're saying is that when we get all old, we should just buy AR-15s and Mini-14s?

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    1. No, when that last day comes and you know you aren't going to be able to fire your rifles without breaking a shoulder, you should go out into the forest, sit down under a big tree, with a good view of the mountains. Then compose and sing your death song. Then keel over dead. Leave the mouse guns for women and kids!

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    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      Mouse Guns!

      Mouse Guns!


      I will have you know that a proper AR-15 with an 18 inch barrel and full length gas system is no Mouse Gun!

      My AR-15 is offended. That is likened to calling a Proud Ferret a mere Rodent!

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    3. Harry, that was the greatest response you've ever left. Love it.

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    4. CC: Well, I've never been sure which of these two stories is true. One says the "mouse gun" appellation comes from the time the rifle was introduced in Viet Nam. The soldiers and Marines, accustomed to the M-14, thought the light, plastic little rifle was "Micky Mouse." Hence the name. You're old enough to remember that "Micky Mouse" meant cheap and "crappy."

      Or, others say it's because the small bullet lacked the stopping power of the .308 and so users said the only thing you could shoot with an M-16 and be sure of killing with one shot was a mouse.

      I kind of feel that way, either way, about the rifle. I just don't like plastic guns. Of course, I know that makes me a minority of one because everybody and their dog owns one. I even own a couple, just so as not to be uncool!

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    5. Matt, I've always thought the Indians had it right on that issue. When you get to be a burden but you still have your dignity, that's the time to check out. The Greeks felt the same way, only they said you should ascend to the heavens on the day you reached your peak, because if not, every day after that was going to be downhill. Being the bunch of health nuts and physique worshipers they were, the idea of getting weak and disgusting looking did not appeal to them.

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  6. My Father had a Mauser 8mm. A grand old rifle that had set trigger. It was the first big rifle I shot and despite its slowness was really accurate and I loved to hunt with it.

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    1. Mauser made some excellent hunting rifles before the second world war, sounds like that might have been what your dad had. They were considered to be about the best you could go, like the Hawkin during the Mountain Man period in the U.S.

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  7. When you think of all the battle rifle used in the early 20th century Mauser, Enfield, Springfield, Mosin Nagant, and Garand all of them were heavy high powered rifles. Then think of carrying and using one of them all day every day some time for years. It give you a new respect for our forbearers.

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    1. They were tougher than we were, more used to hardship. They didn't have machines and technology doing everything for them. I sometimes wonder if the scientists who predict humans will eventually evolve into giant heads with little vestigial arms and legs are not right.

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  8. Bwahahaha. A timely reminder that none of us are as young as we think we are... - no matter how willing.

    Arnica gel relieves the bruising - available at your local pharmacy.

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    1. My shoulder looks really ugly today. Kind of scared me when I saw it, I've heard unusual bruising sometimes means cancer. But then, when you get to be my age everything unusual makes you think that.

      I never heard of Amica but I will sure ask for it at the pharmacy.

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    2. It's also known as " Arnicare gel" It really does help with various types of soreness that I've had with this Lyme. And it doesn't leave a big greasy mess once it dries.

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    3. Well, I'm going to the town in the next county over to the West today. I need more ferret paste for my ferrets. While I'm over there, I plan to go by their pharmacy and get some of that stuff. Sounds like a good thing to have on hand.

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  9. Maybe taking out one of the 6.5x55s out for a stroll would be more your speed ? Mine Swede 38 short rifle is not bad to shoot. Pretty to look at too, I can only imagine what making one of those actions from scratch now would cost.

    Mauser full power carbines - wow, just WOW ! You get the recoil AND the report as well. And if you shoot it in the dark, a light show too ! Such a deal ! :^)

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    1. I have one of the Swedish Mausers out in my radio room/ cum apartment . I've got a box of ammo sitting there for it. But I don't shoot them much, because very little surplus ever came into the states. I have about four battle packs of 6.5X55 soft steel cased ammo, which I am hording, and two cases of good quality Sellier and Bellot brass cased 6.5X55. Then I have maybe 300 cases, and plenty of bullets, powder and primers.

      Still, I have so much surplus 8mm mauser that I can shoot it without feeling guilty.

      I started out to fire out 5 five round stripper clips of 8 mm Mauser ammo as fast and accurately as I could the other day, just to test myself. But when I had fired 21 rounds, I quit. Guess I'll go down to 4 stripper clips worth henceforth. In my defense, it was the Turkish that came in in the early nineties, and that stuff has a reputation for being "hot."

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    2. Oh, I think I remember those 6.5 battlepacks, those were fantastic. I wish I had bought more of those when I had the chance. This round is still rare in the U.S.A., but it appears to be catching on. It should be a classic.

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    3. They weren't cheap , by the standards of the time. The Swedish Mausers came in to the U.S. in a big flood, all at once, though I'm sure some had been imported earlier. There used to be this department store down in a county to the Southwest of us, and they had a gun counter. They sold EVERYTHING your heart could desire. I can remember seeing Enfield MK III, Enfield Mk IV, Swedish Mausers (long and short), American Enfields in .303 British and 30.06, M-1 Carbines, M-1 Garands and a host of other desirable weapons. I knew the man that managed the guns, and he let me go in the back room and cherry pick what I wanted. I would put up to ten rifles on layaway, pay a little on them every month, then into the safes they went! Those were the good old times. Too bad I didn't have enough money in the budget for guns and accessories to really stash away everything I wanted.

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  10. Several years ago I shot an Appleseed with my M1A...two days of constant fairly rapid fire shooting. The second day, a Sunday, I packed my gear and drove home. When I walked thru the door my wife asked why both my elbows were bleeding and wrapped in silver duct tape. My shoulder was black and blue. Oh yes, I understand.

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    1. In 1993 I shot a high power match using my Norinco M-14, down at River Bend outside Atlanta. It was when you had to fire one NRA high power match to get your M-1 Garand from DCMP. Between the hellish heat on the line, and the brutal beating from the .308 rounds, I seriously doubt I would last out half the match today.

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  11. I had a nice place to shoot right across the road from my house. Darn developer bought the land behind me and put up a nice log cabin for me to use a backstop. It was a ways off, but lead does travel -even rounds from girly little poodle shooters.

    Amazing blood red sunset last night. Caught it on my drive home, but didn't have a chance to take a photo. Darn.

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    1. That's why I searched high and low for a piece of land that was hard to get to and had national forest around it. But I am still not safe. The government can trade national forest land for other parcels, that's one threat. The other is a persistent rumor, which I hope is untrue. I keep hearing the Feds are mortgaging our national forests to the Chinese to secure their purchases of our bonds. I hope that's not true.

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  12. This is quite an interesting thread. I have always figured on my Enfields or my Garand to keep me in firepower... And truth be told, I am not as young as I once was...Nor am I able to shoot as much or as often as I once did. (Circumstances changed, life goes on...) This really makes me think. I am not a big fan of the AR series rifles, (Think Cover vs Concealment for instance) Hatcher said you need 48 inches of oak to stop a 30.06. I know that is not so w/ 5.56...It would really suck to need to shoot, and not be able to due to having been beat up the day before...I am going to have to re think some of my decisions. Far better to have that brought to my attention today however....Maybe it is time to re think the medium calibers,like 7.62X39....I wonder if anyone makes a good bolt action chambered for that.
    In the mean time I have a 10 meter shooting space in my shop where I shoot air rifles and air pistols to keep my skills up, and I have accumulated a fair number of old 22s over the years. I always planned to use them for game harvesting and the like.
    I really like it when a discussion makes me think, and exposes a flaw in my planning...

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    1. You can still hang on to your more powerful weapons even as you get older. I figure if I get so decrepit I can't shoot the big guns, I will use one of the AR-15's but I will still have the others to equip people who come up to join me here at a bad time, but don't have weapons. Or, I could trade them for necessities in a barter economy. And anyway, I just WANT them. I like having them. I like cleaning them. I like getting them out of the safe and wiping them down with a Rem Oil cloth.

      I don't know of any bolt guns chambered for 7.62X39, but that doesn't mean they aren't out there. I just don't know all that much about civilian hunting rifles, because I'm not a hunter. My brother is , I'll ask him next time I talk to him on the phone.

      I wouldn't have gotten so messed up if I had worn my old shooting jacket, but the whole idea was to simulate an emergency. Maybe next time I'll wear the jacket anyway, I can't handle this much bruising. It doesn't hurt all that much but it looks like hell.

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  13. Harry - i've told you before but i'll share it again - in basic training we were trained on FNC1's (7.62) - oh my gawd! we girls all had bruised cheeks and eyes, shoulders forearms and the inside of the elbows for about 6 weeks - so did the guys! and FN is NOT a weapon for the average layman! that god-awful weapon threw me at least 30ft off of my sandbag when we were doing the rapid-fire...and guess who never scored highly on the rapid-fire??? ya, that would be me. because i had t keep climbing back up to my sandbag after every single shot. i love my remington .597 however...it's beautiful.

    sending much love. your friend,
    kymber
    (p.s. - this weekend is the "blue moon". i took some pics tonight and i hope they turn out.)

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    1. Kymber, .308 is just too powerful for small women. I've seen some old ladies around here that weigh in at about 400 if they weigh an ounce (that's all that friend food, I guess) and they could use the M-14 or FAL, but the petite, thin women would just get beat up like you did.

      I admit the M-16 style weapons are a lot easier to use, but I like the fact that an old World War II rifle will coldly lay someone out if it hits them, while the word from the Sand Wars is that some of the bad guys, all hopped up on dope, could take hits from the 5.56 and keep on functioning.

      I think my days of doing a lot of shooting with the big guns are drawing to a close. I still like having them, though.

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    2. Long ago, I had a customer that survived D day. He told me he was a very freshly minted Lieutenant, and had a carbine... He was in a "duel"with a couple Germans, and was sure he had at least hit them, but they continued to shoot back. He said he crawled back to the first dead GI he found, picked up an M1, and when he shot them with that, they stayed dead...I will never forget that. I figure the semi auto action on a Garand eats up some of the recoil force, and it is heavy which also helps. Maybe it is time to think about slip on butt pads... Ugly, but I also like my battle rifles.

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    3. The fun of shooting the old guns is diminished for me if I modify them with butt pads, etc. I do usually wear an old USMC cloth shooting jacket though. After this latest experience, I may start using a butt pad anyway. My shoulder is still black and blue.

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  14. I had a 30 40 krag I gave to one of my sons who loves military weapons. he is in the navy and is going to a ww II reenactment in a couple of weeks. he has an m 1 garand he bought a couple months ago.
    I used the krag to kill several Michigan white tails with. the caliber is great for that, and the action really is just like everyone says, butter smooth. it was passed down to my dad and to me and now to my son, somewhere along the line it was sporterized, so it is just a shooter, not a collector, but what a really, really nice gun.
    I would like to find a soft shooting old military gun for deer hunting again, at a reasonable price, but don't know what to look for. any suggestions? not the mosin nagant, I said soft shooting, I can handle recoil, but I hate it, and so I won't practice as much as I need to in order to get proficient with a new gun.

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    1. It's hard to find any military surplus guns at a reasonable price now. One that comes to mind as affordable and not so bad on the kick is the Swiss K-31. I have a couple, and my experience with them has been that the kick is not so bad, and they are plenty powerful enough for hunting deer.

      I don't have a Krag. I've looked at them, but either they were too expensive, or they had been drilled and tapped , and I want one that's stock. There's a pawn shop in town where the owner knows what I need and I expect he will find me one some day.

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