“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Excellent homemade hard tack.



   We were talking about ships bread and hard tack earlier this week.   Part of what brought that to mind was the fact that Lisa over at Two Bears Farm  was experimenting with making her own hard tack.

    She sent me some of the latest version of her hard tack, and it was really good.  First, everything I have in storage is like a big, thick, hard soda cracker.  Lisa's is more like real bread. It's hard, but when you eat it it's chewy and it has a buttery taste.  It is formed into small squares, not quite as big as half a playing card.  You can bend them without breaking the piece of hard tack, unlike anything else I've got in storage.

   She is thinking of making some in different flavors, to have with coffee, for instance.   There was a nice note in the box that said she will be putting the recipe on her blog next week, and that it is easy to make.





Over the years, I've learned a lot from other bloggers.  When you talk about survivalists, they come in all shapes, sizes, and mindsets.  There's a lot of diversity in the community.  There's strength in numbers, and I couldn't put a dollar value on the good suggestions, ideas, assistance and outright good friends blogging has brought me.   Sometimes people have disagreements but usually they get over it.
The more , the merrier.

12 comments:

  1. The only hard tack I ever had the occasion to come across was in Newfoundland a few years back. Theirs is shaped like a chicken egg and about the same size. Hard as a rock and could not be eaten just like that. You'd likely break a tooth if you bit in to it and you would never be able to even put a dent in it. If you threw it at someone you would hurt them. They use it in a meal they call Fish and Brewis, a kind of stew, consisting of salt cod, scrunchions (rendered salt pork fat with its oil) and the hart tack soaked over night. Just about every eatery offers it and it is delicious.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_and_brewis

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    1. That sounds pretty good. I have never heard of hard tack shaped that way, but the idea of cooking it in a stew makes perfect sense. It also sounds a lot like how they ate it in the civil war, fried it in bacon grease or made a "slumgullion" a kind of hobo stew with whatever was at hand.

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  2. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Im looking forward to that Hardtack reciepe.

    Harry' you said something in a previous post about breaking a toe'.

    What' am I going to have to fill up a fifty five gallon stainless steel drum with water from the Gulf of Mexico and haul it up there to you. It would be really hot by the time it got there so it would make a great 'Redneck Hot Tub"

    Not much new going on here. I did get a 10 round mag for the CZ 452 rifle in today. That makes the factory five rounder and two ten rounders. Its a bolt action .22, so I really don't need a whole mess of mags for it.

    Im also looking at the archangel stock for the Mosin Nagant. I may wait on that one since I have been having problems with sighting in the 1931 Hex Receiver rifle I have.
    I will work more on it and do more research on easier ways to sight that rifle in.

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    1. What's the problem you're having with the Nagant?

      Yeah, I was moving some stacked up pails of long term storage food and a heavy one toppled off the stack. The bottom edge fell on my foot. On the middle toe got hurt though. Goes with the territory. Nothing compared to broken ribs.

      It's always good to have spare magazines for every weapon you own. I have a foot locker full of mags, squirreled away just before the 1994 Great Clinton Gun Grab.

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    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      The Nagant was shooting high and to the right if I recall. I got frustrated at the range with it. I know it was high, real high. I remember having to aim two or three feet below the bullseye at a 100 yards just too hit paper?

      Was is me, the sight, or the barrel. I feared the barrel was bent somehow?

      I would to employ it as a bolt gun and not as a safe queen. Archangel stock, 10 round mags, scope maybe, with a nagant sniper bolt.

      Theres a whole new series of bolt guns coming out including a one that is built on a AR platform that uses pmags.
      I know others have fixed up their Nagants to employ them in a similar role and that's something I would like to do.

      Got a cracked rib once when surfing in California when my surfboard got between myself and a wave back in '98.

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    3. You adjusted the sights, right?

      I doubt the barrel is bent. The stock may have a little warp to it. The barrel isn't free floated and the rifle is "stocked" almost all the way to the muzzle.

      Did you check the bore with a bore light, CC? If it's badly pitted or worn it won't throw true.

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    4. Hey Harry.

      (captaincrunch)

      I adjusted the sights alright.

      The bore is good, does not look pitted. No I do not have a bore light, laser bore sighted.

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    5. Well, I don't know what to do about it then. I put a video from You Tube on the blog about adjusting the sights on the rifle. If you put a comment about the trouble you are having on it, maybe some of the other guys will have some ideas.

      I sent you an email about your ancestor in the Civil War. Interesting fellow.

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  3. Harry - i feel exactly the same way! the amount of stuff that i have learned over the years because of others' blogging and sharing is simply amazing! the diversity in what everyone is doing and how they are doing it - blows the mind! i am very thankful for the information that everyone shares.

    sending much love, as always! your friend,
    kymber

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    1. We all live in different environments, in different parts of the country (or the world.) Yet the common goals are similar. Different people take their own tack, so there's a lot of variation in how each of us prepare. We're all still just trying to be sure we can get by now, and when things get worse.

      Over the years I've gained a great deal and improved my position here with help from the community, scattered though it may be. I have been sent things that were useful and tried to do the same for others.

      In some respects, it's like living on a deserted island, but having a radio to talk to other people like yourself all over the world. If the net ever goes, the ferrets and I are going to be lonely up here!

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  4. I am so glad you liked it! I guess you could make these whatever size you wanted, but might have to adjust cooking time of they were very big.
    Regarding the comments above... My only broken ribs were from getting bucked off a very green horse on trails in Texas and then refusing to let go of the reins I still had in my hands (because he was so hard to catch and it was open prairie type land) and subsequently being dragged on my stomach for a good bit by the bucking horse. I had some good dirt road rash over that incident too.

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    1. It was excellent. I hope you got my thank you email. I have another friend that uses that service provider and she has difficulty getting my emails some times.

      You could have gotten killed doing that. I don't know how you stood it with broken ribs. When I broke mine I was very needy and whiny! The thought of being towed along over rough ground by a horse fills me with horror. There are some tough women out there, and clearly you qualify as one of them.

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