“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Monday, September 21, 2015

Rain tonight. A funky visitor at the gates of dawn.


Rain coming in tonight around 2 in the morning.

Outside temperatre at 10 p.m. is 62, the humidity is 77%.

Nothing worth watching on television so  I have the satellite radio set to "Watercolors" which is their smooth jazz station.

All the animals are fed.  No mean feat when you have to feed the cats, dogs, ferrets, regular chickens and the silkies.  Everybody has their own set of needs and wants, so it takes awhile.



Ferret suppers consist of  kitten chow,  cat food,  ferret treats (banana) , a little ferret paste, and a dab of ferret oil.  Both the paste and the oil are largely comprised of fish oil.   Each ferret has to have his own dish, since they get their medicine at the same time and I don't want Spike, who is greedy, eating the medicine that Jet is supposed to get.


This morning, just before dawn, there was a great furor on the porch.  The dogs were all worked up. I went out to see what was going on.  Didn't see a thing, even though I lit up the woods with the flood light. I smelled something though.  There was an overpowering smell.  If you have ever unsaddled a horse and pulled the saddle blanket off a sweaty horse back, that's what the smell was like. You could have cut the air with a knife.

I know there were no horses out in the woods, so I am at a loss to explain what I smelled or what had the dogs in an uproar.


Maybe it was an Uektina.  The Cherokee still believe there are half wolf, half human creatures up here. If it was an Uektina, he's in serious need of some personal hygiene. Uektina were believed to haunt the edges of the forest, around the glades where the Cherokee made their villages. They liked to pick off lone hunters returning at dusk, or the occasional woman or child out gathering nuts and berries near the shadowy parts of the woods. Can't think why the Uektina would smell like a horse, though!


It's been a slow, quiet day with nothing special to report.  I may go into town tomorrow if I get ambitious. That would be the high light of the week.


postscript:

CC: This is the book I think you would enjoy.



Another handy book:





  The For Collectors Only series is really good.  I have their books on the Mosin Nagant, the Springfield 03, the Swedish Mauser and several others. A little pricey but an invaluable reference.

If you look on Amazon, (as much as I hate to say it) you can find used copies in good condition for much less than a new book costs.

The Finnish Mosin Nagants are a really complicated subject. You honestly can't tell the players without a program.

If you really want to get into Nagants, here's a song you need to be able to sing while you work on them. It will get you in the right "Mosin Nagant" mood!



46 comments:

  1. Harry, we had to get rid of our silkie. Turned out it was a rooster. It's crowing was pretty pathetic, but I have sleep issues so we gave it away to the Mexicans. Probably fajitas by now.

    If I may speculate about the smell? I know a few folks over in my neck of the woods who swear to have heard the scream of sasquatch at night while camping in our woods. Some of them even say that it was followed by a putrid stench. Then again, maybe it's simply the dogs having trouble with the lard in their food? --Troy

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    1. Too bad about the silkie, they are really quite pleasant little chickens once you get used to them, and they actually are pretty good layers. My daughter brought down three, one of them died for no apparent reason I could discern, and we still have two.

      Unless the dogs were keeping a horse carcass somewhere on the sly and eating it secretly, I don't think they were responsible for the ghastly smell. I have heard that Sasquatch has a terrific odor, but I think if they smelled like this everyone would just say they smell like a horse, because that was exactly the aroma. No telling. I've been up here so long that I don't worry myself about inexplicable things that happen. There are certainly been some strange events but none that ever did me any harm.

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  2. Hmmmmm. Sounds like your Uektina is something out of the Missing 411 books.
    Kimberly

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    1. Kimberly, are you a David Paulides reader? You never cease to amaze me, not many people are aware of those books. Probably because if you buy them from Amazon they want over a hundred dollars a copy, but the CanAm project sells them for about thirty.

      Very creepy stuff, that. You notice I never go roaring off into the woods at night.

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    2. My parents have three of the Missing 411 books. They like to listen to him when he is on Coast To Coast. I don't normally stay up that late to listen. They have a lot of good speakers on there about GMO's and stuff. So my mom checks there website to see whats going to be on that night, since they have a lot of weirdo's also.

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  3. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    First before I forget. check out hickok45 on channel on youtube. The guy is doing a review of an actual Dragoon, Mosin made in 1900 with the arsin sights, longer barrel. All original and he's shooting off rounds from it.

    It has the Finnish SA marking, probably a recapture and has a well worn patina. I guess it skipped the 1950's upgrades in Romania. The only thing that is missing is the 'Czarist double headed eagle' on the receiver (some Bolseviek stamped it out)

    My dream is to find a Dragoon with the Double headed eagle on it. My guess is that's pretty much impossible, but a guy can dream.

    If Czar Nicholas the second' could only see us now.

    There is a real funny post over at extexanwannabe's blog. Its called 'Guero" The post is 'spot on' on Mexican Barbecue's down here in South Texas. It has some similarities to Mexicans in Geogia, but the Mexicans here are much less troublesome. Most of them were born here too so that helps out. The part I really laughed at was the description on how Mexicans like cheap beer. My neighbors drink the hell out of that Bud Light' that taste like mule urine. I drink Shiner Bock, which is considered classy but respected (not a Fu Fu beer at all)

    That's one thing I also learned about Mexican women. You better damn well make sure she is really single.

    In regards to your post above. We got the legend of the 'Chupacobra' down here. A similar creature that drinks the blood of goats.

    One more Mosin thing I just remembered. I contacted smithsights.com about the front sight I have on order. It should go out October, 8. The are backordered. I paid $47.00 for the adjustable front sight combo.

    That should solve the problem of that rifle shooting way low. I could use the bayonet and get the accuracy back, but I don't think the people at the range would be thrilled of that giant pig sticker out there.

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    1. CC, I didn't realize you were so well read on the history of Mosin Nagants. You have the makings of a collector, no doubt of it.

      If you want a Finnish Mosin, I just saw an advertisement on line from some company that had gotten a few in. You know they are the most desirable and the best built. I can't remember who it was but I will look over some of the companies and see if I can find them. I am sure they cost a lot of money, though.

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    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      The Finnish Mosin's are made by Sako and another company. The Sako's are more desirable. I cant remember the name of the other company.
      Classic Firearms got in a mess of Finnish Mosins, Prices starting at $350. I figure I can just save up and get a Mosin sniper instead. Yeah' the Fin's are really, really nice but knowing that my rifle was handled by a bunch of 'scruffy proletariat bolsieviek's' that did not know how to use flush toilets is impressive.

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    3. It's even more complex than that. The Finnish "Civil Guards" had their own factory to produce their own rifles, and often used components from Germany and Sweden. The Finnish Army contracted theirs out. Serious collectors go for all the different variants. The Collectors Bible for this rifle is a little paperback that costs about thirty bucks. I will go back and post a copy of it on this post. I know you don't much go in for keeping books once you have read them, but this seems to be a special interest of yours and I think the book would enthrall you.

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    4. Thanks Cap'n Crunch for the mention. Last summer, I spent a lot of time at my pop's ranch outside of Bandera. In the evenings, it was customary for me to sit on the back porch drinking bourbon, and smoking. I went in to refresh my drink, and when I returned, the air was filled with a very heavy scent of what I call musk; like a buck. Pop said it was too early for bucks to be around. I figured it must have been a large feral hog. The air was still, and there was no moon. I could barely see across the porch. I heard nothing, but went inside anyway.

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  4. More than once you have told us about strange noises and smells coming from the woods and the dogs raising hell. Creepy. I happen to like the smell of horses, even sweaty ones. (yeah, I know, go figure). Do you sleep with your windows open? I wouldn't.

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    1. I don't mind the smell of sweaty horses. That's why this didn't match up with the Sasquatch stories about how they stink so bad. But the smell was really strong and overpowering.

      I fort up before dark. Everything is locked up and shuttered up. Not just because this is an isolated place in the middle of a deep forest, but because over the years we have had the occasional bear try to get in the house at night.

      I don't go off the porch at night. I have a giant flood light I can use to see up to the tree line. I also have security cameras so I can see strategic places without having to go out around the dark edges of the buildings.

      Years ago, when I was younger, I did follow the dogs up slope, across the meadow, and into a mountain laurel thicket in the dead of night. It was one of those bitterly cold, clear nights. Not a sound in the woods. We all started into the thicket, and you couldn't see two feet it was so dense.I had to push my way in. Suddenly the dogs turned around and ran like hell. They didn't yelp or whine, they just went like lightning bolts. From the dark mass of the laurels just ahead of me, a massive cloud of condensed moist air from something's breath rolled out and virtually covered me up. The stink of it nearly made me sick. I figure whatever exhaled it was at least seven feet tall from the fact that I am more than six feet, and even accepting the fact that whatever it was , was up slope, it had to be at least seven feet for that blast of steamy breath to come down at me like it did.

      I legged it for the house full tilt. That was the last time I ever went out into the woods at night looking for "whatever" was out there. I assume the animal in the laurel thicket was a bear standing on it's hind legs. That's the logical explanation. But bears usually make challenging noises if you get that close to them......

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    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      Im sure it was a bear too. I don't believe in a seven foot tall hominid that could survive the two million years without being found by someone in the wilderness somehow.
      My father was an anthropologist as well as a archeologist. I grew up on this stuff.
      I know science does not have all the answers etc, but with all the hillbillies, rednecks and yuppie hunters combing the entire country. I think a Sasquatch like creature would find its way 'shot dead and laying in the bed of a Ford truck by now.

      Now it could be argued that 'De-evolution' is taking hold. My evidence for this is inner city people who listen to loud car stereo's. The thump, thump,thump is causing most primitive part of the brain to become overactive.
      Someone working could get their doctorate figuring that one out.

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    3. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      One thing I wanted to ask you is for a good receipe for Hardtack. Maybe I could even figure that one out. I thought of that going back to the previous post.

      Delete
    4. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      Thanks for recommending those books. I gotta look into them. I do keep reference materiels but novels I don't keep. I remember most books I read going back to the first Author C. Clarke book I read when I was 12.
      'No Harry Potter juvenile styled books for me. I was going full bore on novels from early on.
      On that sidenote. In classic literature from years (and centuries past) there was no 'age group related literature' It was read 'Homers Iliad' or go chop wood.
      I may not like Abraham Lincoln but if his early years holds true of barrowing books, reading them by candlelight and learning to read advanced books by himself. That's the way it should be.

      Our best leaders of the past had 'Classical educations' Hell my Grandfather the Cattle Rancher would recite latin phrases while watching his cattle from horseback (the only phrases I know are anglo saxon cusswords)


      On another note, I was impressed with the video of the Russian National anthem. Its good to see Russia rise up out of the ashes of communism and collapse and the people find meaning in their lives.

      Russian culture is different from American culture. I understand their ways so I admire them. I like my freedom (or whats left of it) I damn sure like being a Texan. I guess the academics get culture and nationalism confused?
      A culture needs a standard to cling to. A lighthouse and history to guide a people. Not control, but to provide a reference on who you are. Where you came from and where your going.
      Harry' I can really see why your people in the deep south are so offended by the Confederate flag fiasco from earlier this year.
      Texas culture is a little different. We have our flag, our attitude of making it on our own, the Lone Star attitude.

      Russia 'alas has found its history and therefore found its future. A people lost for over 70 years has a cultural path that will keep them going for millennia if they make no extreme bad decisions or course corrections.

      I gotta finish up by saying that from what all I have seen. There are very few ugly women in Russia. That would be interesting, finding a girlfriend that's former Russian military. Maybe with luck her last name would be 'Mosin or Kalashkinov' I would be the envy of all my friends at the gun range:)

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    5. I don't know, CC. Nobody believed in the mountain gorilla until one was brought back by the German explorer Captain Robert von Beringe on Oct 17, 1907.

      The Coelacanth was absolutely guarenteed by scientists to have been extinct for several million years, until one turned up in a fishing net in 1938.

      I'm not saying there is. I'm just not saying there isn't. You have to go out in the national forest, way off away from the trails and roads, and get up on a mountain top and look off into the distance. There's a hell of a lot of territory where people don't go. Now figure the American West and Canada. I'll tell you something else, I used to spend a lot of time out in these woods, and I never saw a bear carcass. I know damn well there are bears here, I see them all the time, but I couldn't prove it if someone told me to, on my own.

      There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
      Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
      - Hamlet (1.5.167-8), Hamlet to Horatio

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    6. Man, if you think those Russian girls in that video were pretty, look at the selection of videos that pops up once that one has played. There's one about Slavic women in the military, and they are enough to make an old guy like me have a heart attack.

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  5. For the hard tack recipe, go to Lisa's blog. She is the lady who sent me the really good hardtack and she posted the recipe on her blog. I have it somewhere in my "filing cabinent blog" but it would be quicker to go to
    http://www.twobearsfarm.com/search?updated-max=2015-08-21T05:46:00-04:00&max-results=7&start=7&by-date=false

    That's her post on Aug 19, 2015 with the write up on the hard tack. It's a good blog, they have their own little farm in Virginia.

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  6. I hope it was a bear and not your forest monster!

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    1. Alas, Kathy. If it's up to me we'll never know. I don't go out in the woods at night anymore. In fact , I rarely go into them at all these days. I probably should repair the electric fence and seal off the area around the buildings at night, but every storm that comes along drops trees or limbs on it and I am constantly out there trying to fix the fence so I just let it go.

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  7. Hey CC,
    I went back and posted that video of the Slavic women in the military for you. Thank God we never went to war with the Eastern Block. What a waste that would have been!

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    1. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      I viewed the video's. I am torn between staying the course of what I know best (permanent bachelorhood) and finding a woman. I think that American women culturally are spoiled. They want everything, looks money, social status. What can you do for me attitude. Everything I detest in our materialistic society. If a woman is just a 'rotund' The media has her pegged as inferior when in she still may be very attractive and but that women is now programmed to think there is something wrong with her.

      Now women in other countries may have a different perception of what beauty is. Some of those Slavic women you could tell eat a little food but look really, really good. I guess their standards for men also may be different and maybe a bit more relaxed too.

      I guess if I had the resources to spend time oversea's I could pick up an import. I gotta live there for awhile and pick and chose. Get to know the women, their backgrounds, reputations and not lock onto a gold digger that wants American citizenship.
      A nice Russian farmgirl, cute looking, but average, not a beauty queen. That would be nice.
      I doubt that would happen in all reality. I don't have the resources nor the time to go globetrotting for a girlfriend.

      I look at it this way. I chose this path over twenty years ago for a reason.

      The unexamined life is not worth living.

      I have accomplished more in life being single than I could being married with kids. I chose this path knowing what I was giving up and I know the choice would be painful but the fruits of my adventures and labors make up for it.
      In rare occasions one can have both a family, wife and kids, and life of adventure and of self interest. In most cases a choice has to be made because of 'keeping up with the Joneses' mentality and the much sought after yuppie lifestyle is preeminent in most American womens minds.

      I made my choice a long time ago.

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    2. Whatever works for you. My wife has been a good helpmate and companion, and I can't imagine life without my kids. But people are different. I am sure your life is much less complicated and you spend a lot less time worrying about other people than I do.

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  8. Harry,

    It sounds to me like you had a bear visitor. He/she was hot and bothered, probably just got done searching for food around your place and ventured on to the next place.
    Bear have a stinky smell if they've just killed or have been digging through someone's trash.

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    1. I can't think what else it might have been, so I will go along with that.

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  9. You've got something strange in your woods. In my 20s and 30s I did a lot of night hiking without artificial lights. Strange hobby, maybe, but I got good at moving in the dark. Often one or two friends would join me. Once came within 6 feet of a lynx in the dark. We met face to face on a bog bridge. Scared the crap out of both of us.

    We have heard some very strange noises out there. I was raised to not fear the dark. My dad used to play games with me in the dark when I was a little kid. Most sounds can be explained, but there are few things out there that just weird me out.

    I have come across exactly one dead bear in the woods. The stink was amazing. In a week it was gone with just bits of fur and bone left.

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    1. From time to time, I've heard things out here that I couldn't identify. I try to listen to different bird noises on the internet, but you have to know the name of what you think it is to look it up. Since I'm no ornithologist I think I just don't know the right bird to be checking on.

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  10. would it be possible to put a top bar across the fencing to repel dropped branches? to save $$ you could use some of the longer dropped branches?

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    1. It's a big fence. It encloses the entire meadow, and all the buildings. The branches that come down are often bigger than a sapling pine tree truck in diameter, and sometimes I get whole trees down across it. I liked having the electric fence, but it was an appalling amount of work and it never ended.

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  11. I have never heard of that creature before. Might be fun to research it just a little more. We have had rain here for two days, but we needed it. It's much cooler now, which is nice too.

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    1. I've tried to do more research but the problem is the spelling of the name. I I have tried it phonetically, and usually I come up with a Cherokee myth about a horned serpent. But some spellings bring up the half wolf half man creature. There are lots of drawings and paintings of the creature on the internet, I guess it catches the imagination of artistic people.

      Cooler here now, but still humid.

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  12. Hey Harry,
    What is your e-mail address? I have a question I want to ask you regarding ammunition.

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    1. Sandy, it's philipnolan1953@gmail.com.
      I look forward to your question.

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  13. do you have wolverines there....they smell like wet sadde blankets with a hint of bear.

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    1. Fiona, we don't have wolverines. I have seen pictures of them but they are not native to Georgia.

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  14. I tell you Harry, I was glad to see the rain. We are in a severe drought over here and every little bit helps. Sounds like you may have had a crazy liberal coming up to get you registered to vote this morning. BTW, thanks for sending those books for the kids. They have been all over me showing everything to me. I guess I raised them right, they like military stuff and not that tele-tubby or Barney crap.

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    1. I know you are dry over there. We've had a good bit of rain in the afternoons so things are staying pretty damp here.

      Maybe it was someone from the 13% who didn't like my posts!

      I was glad to send the boys the books. It's good to find someone who appreciates them, and I don't much look at them anymore.

      It does sound like you have a really nice family, you and Glock Mom have done well. Not so easy today.

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  15. Harry,

    Sounds like a Yowie from Aboriginal legend, they are supposed to be similar in appearance to your Big Foot.

    Iv'e felt a bit uneasy a few times while camping out in the bush, nothing I could put my finger on, just felt like something was watching the camp. While there are many things that can kill you in the bush down here, the only large predators are salt water crocs and feral pigs, they will both attack without warning and there is not much left after they finish eating!

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    1. I think people are inherently afraid of the dark. It probably goes back to when they were gobbled up by some predator if they left the camp fire at night.

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    2. I think you are right, if it is a full moon I have no problem wandering out in the bush but on a dark moonless night you put another log on the campfire and are reluctant to go anywhere until the call of nature forces you to!

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  16. It rained so hard today when it was sunny. All the sudden it turned dark, and started hailing.

    I never knew what ferrets ate. Cat food? That's good...easy enough to find. Bananas are even easier to find.

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    1. Ferrets pretty much eat what they started out on as babies. It would be best if they ate commercial ferret food, like Marshal's. It is high in protein and designed for their digestive tracs. But it's expensive. The kid who had the ferrets before we got them just fed them cat food. I was able to move them over to kitten chow, which is higher protein, but they won't eat the good stuff. There are lots of kinds of packaged ferret treats, they look like little cookies. My ferrets like chicken, beef and banana flavored ones but they like banana best.

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  17. I was up at a little lake up in the Shenandoah Park area. Just hanging out with my (then) wife and kid. Daylight and all. Something just creeped me out completely. Like the hairs on the back of my neck up creeped out. I quietly told them to come on, we walked to the car and left. I have no idea what it was, but nothing like that has happened before or since. Just an overwhelming urge to Get Outta There right NOW. Very strange.

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    1. In my experience when you get that feeling there's a good reason for it. I always heed instinct.

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