Truth.

A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within.

Ariel Durant

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Blogger is acting up again.

Blogger is giving me trouble with comments. I had to do a cut and paste from the dashboard comment file to get one comment on the blog even though it shows as posting.  Just an admin note.

The political shenanigans have become so bizarre I'm having trouble following up on all of it.

The Democrats, in 65 speeches yesterday, did not mention ISIS once. They are trying to refute Trumps allegations about the dangers facing America by ignoring them. Taking a play out of Obama's play book, as it were. As Twshooz and some other people mentioned, it doesn't matter who released the emails from the DNC, as long as they were released. All this hoopla about the Russians is a smoke screen to divert attention from the content of the emails. So much for that.



The latest ISIS attack in France, in which an elderly priest had his throat cut in his own church, and hostages were harmed before the police could kill the terrorists, has gotten a 14 word line on the ticker at the bottom of the screen. It does't go well with what the Dems are selling, i.e. that we are all worried about nothing and Trump's warnings are just an attempt to manipulate the masses. I am amazed at the control the Dems exercise over MSM, even after years of experiencing it. I am also amazed at the naivety and ignorance of current events the rank and file of the Democratic party evidence on a daily basis.




As for events here, far less frenetic than in Philadelphia.  I left my gas cap on the pump at a gas station in Chattanooga, so I had to go into town this morning and get a new one.  Never go into an auto parts store in the South unless you have a couple of hours to spare. It's worse than the barbershop.

The parts store is where the old guys go to hang out when it's too hot to sit on the town square. Some old geezer about 85 or so was in there picking up a tractor part. He had to tell the whole life story of his tractor. Then how the  aforenamed part broke.   How hard it was to get off. How they ordered the wrong part the first time. All about how important it is to keep the box when you order parts...and on, and on, and on.  There was only one clerk. The number of people waiting to be helped grew longer, and longer. But no one said one thing. First, it's considered the privilege of the elderly (this guy was 85 if a day) to babble on and on. Second, it's rude to suggest that you might have something else to do today, despite the riveting story he's telling. Third, you don't know whose grandpa this old man might be, It's unwise to offend people you don't know in the South. Extended families can be murder, quite literally.

Finally he shut up and meandered out of the shop. I bet I was in there half an hour, at least, and it took me 3 minutes to pay the for the gas cap. I called ahead and it was sitting there on the counter waiting for me.




ANY WAY.....


I'm still running low on steam, so I am going to read some blogs and then take a nap.

Every so often I reprint this letter from my little brother. He lives inland, in Oregon, where he went to University on the Navy Nickel like his two brothers. But he has a house on the beach along the coast.

They had a tsunami event some years back, and it did not go well. Here's his description. I repost it for anyone who hasn't seen it before.


 original  posted on the old Hermanos blog Friday, March 11, 2011. 


Today was surreal, and I will try to describe it as best I can because I know you guys are going to love the story. I should start by letting you know it's all good here, people got killed down the coast a ways, but we didn't and are back home now. No damage was done and we are no worse for wear.
For me it started at about 5:30, more or less, when my cell phone went off, later determined to be RXXX calling in a warning. I had been hearing sirens going off in my subconscious, but had blown them off. When I saw I had a message from   RXXX I knew it was bad news, I just figured somebody else had died. Once I heard the message, I sprung into action. I looked outside and people were running in and out of their houses in pajamas throwing shit into their cars. I saw a black man dragging three small dogs into a car, shrieking "hurry hurry!" Police cars and fire trucks were going up and down out street blaring out muffled warnings, something about a tsunami, and evacuate immediately. It was total chaos. Then my neighbor lady calls me on my cellphone and shouts, "What should I do, what should I do?!!" I said, and I quote, "Hell Katie you've lived here your whole damn life, and I got here in September, how the hell should I know? But if I was you I would get out!" She did.
I ran and woke Jenny up, yelled there is a tsunami coming and we have to get out, pack some stuff. She said, "What stuff?". I was forced to reply, "I don't know, so food and shit". It was a bad scene, nobody knew exactly what to take, so we ended up taking the following, and I know this because when we got home I looked.
  - pajamas and a blanket- a pack of macaroni and cheese- my shaving kit and two pairs of drawers- Jenny brought her jewelry box- a hair dryer, hair products, make up - a bag of important family photos and our check book.- Beretta 92F and one full magazine
T.J. was in charge of food, no shit, and on his own he filled a bucket with 5 granola bars, two cans of coke, and a bag of baby carrots. This is the sum total of what we fled with. I left the cats to fend for themselves.
We joined the stampede to Hwy 101 intent on heading east to Corvallis. When we reached 101, it was like rush hour traffic. The first thing I saw was a full sized pickup hauling a huge travel trailer make a crazy left turn through the intersection dragging his safety chain causing sparks to fly behind him. He had no tail lights. The Shell station on the corner was lined with cars to the street, all directions, probably 50 vehicles, parked all different angles and directions. Two grown men were in a fistfight in front a gas pump. I heard a cacophony of horns and yelling. We surged into the steaming masses and were swept into the line of vehicles, which soon came to a crashing halt in a bumper to bumper mass traffic jam. One asshole couldn't wait, and fishtailed into the gravel on the shoulder and tried to pass the crowd on the right for high ground. He got by me but somebody else was having none of it and blocked his path with his vehicle. At that point I realized that getting out of town, on the one and only road out, was not going to happen. I made a tactical decision to head for my friend Jeff's house, he lives high on a hill above the bay. I know the town well enough that I took a back road, and arrived there shortly thereafter. The police and fire trucks continued to blare out muffled warnings. Lot's of cars were on the roads.
Once at Jeff's, we had a tsunami party, he has a perfect view of the bay and ocean from his front window, and he has a big telescope. Jeff made pancakes and sausage, Mimosa's, and coffee. We just sat there and ate and waited for the big one. It never came.
Then, at about 8:30, my mailman buddy who is also a volunteer fireman, calls and says the tsunami hit and he's boogie boarded on bigger waves than that. Then he says, they're cutting half of us loose from the fire department, "Dude, let's go crabbing, we'll have the whole bay to ourselves!" I said, "Right on, Jenny has to go to work anyway." So I loaded up the family and went home. We drove down by the state park and saw a bunch of people standing there looking out to sea, waiting for the big one. Everything was mellow on my street. Jenny went to work, I took T.J. to school, and then met my buddy at the boat ramp with my boat. It was awesome, we had all the great spots to ourselves, and shared a 6 pack of beer. There was nobody else crabbing, so we cleaned up. He did have his fireman radio with him though, so if another wave came our plan was to firewall my boat away from the wave, catch the crest, and ride it all the way up the river to Corvallis. I figured if I died out there, I would become family legend, "Yeah old Unkie Txxx died in Newport crabbing during a tsunami." There are a lot worse ways to go.

Things are back to normal now, and no harm, but I did learn a huge lesson today. That lesson is this: Bad shit can happen, and happen really fast, and you better believe it can happen and be prepared to deal with it when it does. I was woefully unprepared, (as was everybody else from what I saw) and it could have cost me. Jenny and I both realize just how poorly we were prepared, so now are going to take the steps needed to make that right. To conclude, I have to say, today was like something you see in a movie, it was unbelievable how fast things degenerated and it became every man for himself faster than you can imagine. I was lucky, it could have gotten really ugly.






30 comments:

  1. Oh, that their noses would grow when they lied...that would be obvious proof to the world. I'm sick and I'm scared.

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  2. Well, I think this business with the email disclosures will open some eyes, although "there are none so blind as those who will not see." I think most people are not taking things as seriously as they might. For one reason, all this turmoil hasn't yet directly touched most people and they lack the imagination and foresight to see that inevitably it will. For another, as long as you don't take it seriously you don't have to worry about it.

    So feeling anxiety and wondering what steps to take are indications that you are situationally aware. You have a lot of good company.

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  3. Great reminder from your brother about the need to be prepared. Also an interesting look into southern culture. I know I could learn a thing or two about patience. --Troy

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    1. My brother T is a great guy. He used to just laugh off preparedness. He said he was always able to take care of himself, and that's true enough. But he had a young wife (she's 22 years younger than he is, the old Perv!) and a small boy when this happened, and that changed his attitude. It's harder to take care of yourself when you have a wife and a kid to take along for the ride. I always remember what Grima Wormtounge said about the evacuation of Edoras , and why they should attack the column on the march.

      Gríma: "They will have women and children with them."

      You have to really watch yourself down here. I don't blow the horn or make Hawaiian good luck signs at people on the road because it's too dangerous. Years ago, if you messed with somebody weaker or older than you, they would say "just you wait . My (fill in here with son, cousin, brother, or any male relation) will catch your a** on the town square and then we'll see!" That was no idle threat. There was a family here that everybody lived in fear of because they were mean, they were violent, and there were a hell of a lot of them. Haven't heard much of that particular clan in years, I guess civilization caught up with them.

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  4. France. Hmmm. You can attack Paris and get a brush-off. But attack a priest during service in a small town in Normandy?

    Normandy?

    Where the Normans come from? Where they are still proud of producing William the Conqueror, the best leaders of the First Crusade, held off the English over and over again, rebuilt quicker and better than most of France after we rescued them?

    A church in Normandy?

    That would be like ISIS attacking a small Baptist church in the deep rural south and killing the pastor.

    The country folk both here and in France feel that city attacks are horrible, but, they happen in the city. Now that the attack occurred in the country, expect the French version of bubba to get all agitated.

    Normandy? Really? Dumb dumb dumb.

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    1. Hitting rural communities is smart from the terrorist point of view because it's not enough to just unsettle people who live in the city. No one can feel safe for their terror tactics to succeed. On the other hand, if there are Moslems about , they ought to give serious consideration to moving. Algeria is nice this time of year, I hear. County people, as you point out, are far more likely to respond on their own hook and not sit back waiting for the state to provide justice.

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  5. I'm with Gail. Nearly every day there is some new horror. And nobody sees. Nobody cares. I'm pretty sure that if I mentioned Orlando in a conversation with family, they would talk about tourist attractions - not a massacre. I am beginning to believe they have adopted my Mother's way of dealing with anything unpleasant - "If we don't talk about it, it will go away."

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    1. The "head in the sand" approach is pretty common. For people who have grown up being told what to do by the government, and who believe that they have no personal responsibility nor capability to do anything for themselves, it's a perspective that makes sense. If it's the governments responsibility to take care of you, and you can't do anything to take care of yourself, why worry? Of course, herds of beef cattle and flocks for sheep have the same attitude, and it does not serve them very well in the end.

      I've noticed that terrorist attacks which would have tied up the airways even a month ago now get a mention in passing, or just a few words on the ticker below the screen. It's old hat now.

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  6. Living half an hour from town as we do we always make sure we have petrol in the car - just in case of an emergency trip. Half a tank = fill her up 😉 Our kids are a 2.5hour drive away, ditto a hospital. No sense in having to stop for fuel in a possible panic situation.

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    1. That's a standard survivalist rule here, never let the vehicle get below half a tank. I keep my tank full, or nearly full, just for peace of mind. I also keep gas in Jerry cans, in a shack away from the buildings. We keep a vehicle bag in the Jeep and truck. I also carry a long gun in the vehicles now, though I don't leave it in there full time. I take it in the house at night.

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  7. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)


    That story about the auto parts store really made me laugh. I gotta remember that one. Never go into an auto parts store in the south unless you have a few hours to spare.

    Ive been in a few situations like that.

    Down here in Texas its the lottery tickets. There might be 10 people in line in a convienence store and some low brow, white trash jackass is carefully selecting 20 scratch off lottery tickets.
    I always make it a point to say in a loud voice. I'm glad my retirement does not rely on lottery tickets. I always get some stares at that one and a few laughs from the poor bastards in line.

    That news on the priest in France was really sad. Hacking off the head of an 86 year old man. 'Just pathetic, absoulutely pathetic.

    Pope Urban II had the right idea on 1095 AD. They want a Jihad. Give them a Crusade. Break' out the Bacon,
    Air Dropped Cluster Munitions and AC-130 Gunships. We can make Saddam Hussien look like 'Captain Kangaroo'

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    1. God will it!

      Instead of a Childrens Crusade, let's have an Old Geezers Crusade. Hell, I'd go. I'd only be good for fixed positions though, no more hiking for me. ;-)

      I get really annoyed with people who buy those damned tickets at the gas station. But I don't say anything about it. I just go to get gas where they don't sell them. I used to buy gas at Circle K because it was the cheapest place in town, but the lottery ticket thing there got to be too much of a pain in the rear.

      Yeah, I notice these guys are not big on a stand up fight. One of the two that attacked the church was wearing an electronic bracelet because he had been arrested trying to go to Syria. That form of incarceration clearly has some kinks that need to be worked out.

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  8. I am trying to avoid the political hoopla as much as possible. For one thing, it makes me mad, not only what they say, but that people believe it.

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    1. Rush Limbaugh said today that the only thing he has been surprised at lately on the political front is that half the people in the country apparently believe the lies the Democrats are spewing. It really is an appalling thought.

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    2. That many? That's scary.

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    3. Leigh, the indications are that half the people in this county are vehement adherents of Hillary Clinton. The other half are diametrically opposed to the liberal view of the world. It's about 50 50.

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  9. I have a grown man customer, 82 yrs old. He is a total dyed in the wool Democrat, and I just do not get it. He is smart as heck, but loves him some Hilary... Go figure.

    Interesting story from your Brother. I expect any "bug out" scene to be similar. I have some thoughts on the matter. First, having a ready to go "bug out bag" is likely a good idea. You can refine your load over time, but it would be ready to go at a moments notice. That might put you ahead of the curve in avoiding the traffic... Keep your tank near to full. I have always thought a motor cycle might be a good idea. You are more vulnerable on a bike, but the right bike will go places a car cannot. I also remember the Viet Cong used bicycles to move goods, not necessarily riding them, but loading them up and pushing them along. If you had 2 similar bikes, you could secure them together and move a lot of stuff, far easier than carrying it.
    I was in downtown DC on 9/11. They evacuated the city and there was mass panic, clogged streets and so on. I stayed in my brick building and waited the morons out. I went home at 7:30 or so, and the streets were empty. I realize that will not always be possible (see tsunami), but if that is an option, it is worth considering.
    Meanwhile, arm yourselves if you have not already, buy as much ammo as you can afford, and shoot enough to be comfortable with what you bought. You are responsible for your safety, and that of your family and loved ones. Steel your hearts, and if they wish to bring the fight to us, lets win.

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    1. Sensible sentiments.

      I carry vehicles bags in the Jeep and the truck. I keep the fuel tanks as close to full as I can, and never go below half a tank.

      The bike thing would work pretty well if you were in the countryside. I think near a city "de bruddas" would be out in force and you might have to fight them for your goods. I read a post apocalyptic fiction novel where the protagonist and his friends did exactly that though, and it did not seem unrealistic.

      When it blows up, and it's going to blow up, the only question will be to what degree? If it's the long, hot summer scenario I can sit it out up here quite comfortably. If, on the other hand, it's a total collapse scenario then all bets are off.

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    2. Harry, I think you are well positioned where you are. You know your land well, and there are only so many ways to get at you. (at least for 90% of the folks that might want to try) And if they arrive to a buzz saw, they will no doubt try an easier target.For now, I am not. I am 12 miles outside of DC...Little industrial park in the 'burbs. I have outward opening steel doors, in steel frames, and the like. No ground floor windows...It will do for the immediate SHTF... I have food and water stored as well as a variety of defenses on hand. (I am a mechanic... Heh, from hammers to torches, to machetes to... well whatever) I have plans to GTF outta here, in the next year, but will not likely do it by election day. There re a few trusted folks who have an invitation here, otherwise it is just 2 of us.
      I figure a motorcycle would be great around here. You can get around all the non moving cars, the C and O canal towpath goes to Cumberland, mostly through rural land. The only drawback really is that you cannot take it all with you. Staying alive to fight another day though..
      Bicycles might be best for night time travel, hopefully in a decent sized force. It would suck, but it is another avenue to pursue. I am looking at a motor conversion for a bike. Extend the range a lot, and less work. Just thinking out loud really. Never be set on only one way. The more options you have the greater chances of success.

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    3. J, you are really sitting on the epicenter there. I hope you can get out and get somewhere safer very soon. But in the interim, you have a good set up and have done what you could do. You are wise to limit access to your place. In an urban environment, that's just about essential. I'm sure you have seen the old twilight zone episode about the bomb shelter. That was really how it is.

      I elected to build a retreat and bug in, long before I ever heard the terms. I knew when I left the service in 1986 that I wanted to be as far away from population centers as I possibly could be. I tend to think in terms of very rural environments when I do my planning, but the situation in an urban area is entirely different and I am sure you are more keyed in to the needs of that scenario than I am.

      My reason for bugging in here is pretty simple. My supplies and equipment are here. My buildings are all set up for living out in the woods without connection to the outside world. I'm hard to find, and there's nothing out here in these woods to guide people to me or make them come this way.

      I use all my energy now in maintaining what I have. Sometimes it's an uphill struggle as I get older.

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    4. As soon as I am able, I am heading for a more rural area. Looking in WVa, and Texas, and maybe northern Az. I have a LOT of tools, and an extensive library, and want to bring them with me. I figure one can be useful even if you are too old to be carrying the spear. (I am 58, but sadly not getting any younger...)My dad collected "traditional" tools, mostly for wood working. When he died I selected a pretty good set, so even if power is gone, I still have the ability to do things. Plus a lifetime collection of mechanics tools. The biggest drawback is moving them will suck. I have lead casting equipment and lots of lead. Only a few molds so far, but they are cheap enough. I have not had the time to figure out what I need for that yet.
      I see you added some perimeter defense. If you go to a site called The Lizard Farmer, and go back in the archives to April-May 2012, he has a great series on defense of property. I learned a lot from them. Things like "tanglefoot" which amuses me if nothing else...I am listening to that pinhead Kaine speaking at the DNC... Raising my blood pressure.

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  10. Evening Harry: I have attempted 5 times to comment in an erudite manner and with exceptional insight on your brothers experience and the laptop has eaten them all. Let me try simplicity..."Bob live South Oregon Coast. Him stuck low level house - earth shake, water come, him need swim like hell. So, bags packed stuff stacked door to go truck...not be like bro...if road bad me screwed...too old to run." There, for whatever reason, the system will allow me to comment if I make a fool of myself...didn't know that I needed any help. Aarrgh.

    Side note...have followed your blog for a while...glad you came back.

    bobbookworm

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    1. Bob, I have no idea why the blogger is not letting you post comments. I have it set up so that anyone can comment, which is why I have to keep comment moderation on. Keep trying.

      You live pretty near my brothers beach place, I bet. I am a little hazy on the geography of Oregon, but I know T is an hour from the beach from his house inland.

      Welkam! Yo stap gut? Me savi tok bylong yu. Him fella wave come, chop plenny fella!

      Yu savyi mi tok pisan?

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  11. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    I just ordered a book by a writer named 'Tom Kratman' the book is called 'Celiphate' and it takes place in early 22nd Century Muslim controlled Europe.

    It got some pretty good reviews so I bought a used copy for $4.00 on amazon.

    A quick bio on the writer said he did a career in the Army and then went to "Boston College' and got a law degree which is an accomplishment.

    I got free shipping so it wont be here until early August or so but I will do a review of the book for you guys.

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    1. I would be interested in hearing what you think of it. I'm always up for something new to read, especially since the summer nights here get mighty quiet.

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  12. Harry: Don't think that the problem was on your end...my laptop ate them but I suspect that it was somehow operator error...so of course it's the laptops' fault. If he was in Newport, I am about 2 1/2 to 3 hours south just above the California border. When we returned to the coast from 20 years in Phoenix, we wound up with what was available and what we could afford which turned out to be about 30 feet above sea level and in the tsunami zone...thus the BOB's and a bunch of supplies staged to throw in the truck for the dash uphill. All the normal survival stuff (water,shelter,fire, defense, etc.) stored in plastic totes and sealed buckets so we are ready for wet weather (it is Oregon). The goal is less than 10 min. If the Cascadia fault lets go with the big one and trashes the roads we are in deep sushi...between the wifes' health issues and my knees I don't know if we would make high ground on foot. Maybe. mi savyi soso.

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  13. If we drown I'll blame it on the wife...she is an old Navy brat and demanded to be able to see the water.

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    1. Bob, sounds like you have it well wired. I guess it's all a matter of how much warning you get, and how fast you can get away before the mob chokes off the roads and it looks like the final scene of "Deep Impact."

      I miss the ocean. Most of my military career I lived right on the beach. Arizona would be nice too, I'm a big fan of the desert. But life has been good to me overall here in the Appalachians. I guess a fellow is never really satisfied.

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  14. Evening Harry: Doubt that I have it "well" wired but half a plan is better than no plan. If we don't make it to high ground it won't be the crowds unless the neighbor's cows make a break for it. It will be all the trees down or the roads out from the collapse of sandy soil. Probably a bit of both...When we came back we were tired of "city life" so we wound up about 15 miles out of town...still too near the main highway for my taste when the horde starts to move but at least away from any really close neighbors. And when you get to our age you have to start allowing some for ease of access to civilization.

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    1. That's an issue that's an increasing irritation for me. We don't have much in the way of medical care here. It doesn't help that about a third of the doctors in the county were recently hauled off to prison for running a huge opiate dealing business out of our hospital. If you need decent medical facilities you have to go to Gainesville, Georgia. A two hour drive on the wrong side of the mountains and infested with Hispanic gangs.

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