“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Living in the Third World. North Georgia is good practice.


The infrastructure in rural Georgia is pretty sad.  So, if you live in a county that's way out there from the power centers like Atlanta, Macon, Valdosta, Athens, etc. you have to deal with a lot of  Third World stuff.
Art by Jay Flaxman:  Appropriate attire for living in my county.



Our roads are awful.  Not the big road coming into town, of course, but the roads we who live out in the bush have to use. When it snows, they don't get sanded or plowed.  When they get pot holes, the pot holes just stay there forever.

Our power grid is marginal. That's why just about everybody has a generator.  The phone lines work, sometimes. Usually not if there has been a storm because all the phone lines coming out into the woods are above ground. So pine trees fall on them, and that's that.

There is one, and only one internet service provider here. They are so bad, the company was the subject of a state investigation last year.  Google "Windstream Sucks" and see the hundreds of pages and hundreds of images that come up.  My internet went out Tuesday morning early, and just came on again this afternoon. How long it will stay on, your guess is as good as mine.

Well, I don't do facebook, but guilty as charged as regards the internet.


There is one, single, solitary  telephone land line provider. The same low renters that have the lock on internet. And you have to buy your power from the EMC, I've said enough about that bunch of crooks already.

If you have AT&T cell service, you can sometimes find a spot other than in town where you can get a signal. Mine works here at the house, if I go outside, cross the meadow, go up slope to a big pile of granite boulders, and stand up on the highest one. Well, it works sometimes. Not if there is any weather in the area.

Then, even the resources we do have, are used up where the High and Mighty live. Out on the lake shore, or the gated communities on mountain ridge lines with great views. If you live in the less settled quadrant of the county, where there are not very many people, (like I do) you are sucking hind tit. (This is not a vulgar expression, it refers to hogs) You're the last area the repair crews come to, the last place any road maintenance is done, the last place the internet fiber optic system is going to show up.

But at least people don't live around me or come into this part of the woods much......

So living here is just great practice for the way the rest of the country is going to have to live before very long.





Thought for the Day:







10 comments:

  1. We aint far behind you here in Maine. Southern Maine is not so bad (if you ignore the Moonbats and the cold), but up in "the county" its the end of the road.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wanted to live "way out there" but sometimes dealing with all the failures of infrastructure gets old. Especially the one thing I can't compensate for, the internet. I feel really cut off when that goes, because the only people I really communicate with are those I interact with here and on their blogs.

      Delete
  2. PS: Found the ultimate bug-out vehicle for you.
    http://bringatrailer.com/listing/1958-dkw-auto-union-munga/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Let me take a look. Things in France have got me distracted right now, but I will check it out shortly.

      I have been thinking one of the new Jeep trucks, since I can't get one of those Australian rigs.

      Delete
  3. Like the difference between Southern and Northern NH. Southern NH is a suburb of Boston. North of the White Mountains it's the end of everything. First to lose power, last to get it back. Finally give up on Fairpoint land line and connect through my Internet connection -when it works. No cell phone service unless I walk down to the lake and the weather is clear.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I was younger, there wasn't any internet to worry about, and there weren't any cell phones. So mainly it was power and land line that went out all the time. I had a generator, and I could get by without external communications if I had to.

      But as the years have passed, I have incorporated the new technologies into my lifestyle, and now when I don't have them I miss them. Of course, I need to psychologically prepare myself for not having any of that, if the balloon goes up. I am sure my age has some impact on my attitude, since I am very intolerant of paying for a service and then not getting it.

      Also, I am way too attached to the internet, but it's the only link I have to the people I consider my friends, as I don't make local friends and I don't socialize in person.

      Delete
  4. We have similar problems in the Texas "boonies." My husband's boss calls us "stick people" because we live in the sticks. Yes, having our service interrupted out here can be very frustrating, but when everything goes to ---- in a handbasket, we will be glad that we are living in such remote areas. Jana

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I originally picked this location for it's remote nature. Having to put up with constant utility failure is part and parcel of this lifestyle. It does get old sometimes but as you point out, a remote location will pay dividends, and I think in the not too distant future.

      Delete
  5. So, Harry. When did you let someone draw you?

    The Gaiters are an especially nice fashion touch.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can see people who look a lot like that at the farmers depot or the general store up here almost any day. It's high style in Appalachia. :-)

      Delete