Truth.

"A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within."

Ariel Durant

Monday, September 19, 2016

Damn those Coal People anyhow!







Remember those  .22LR M-1 Carbines Erma made for awhile?  AIM has some in. All the excellent conditions are sold out but the good conditions are still there.  I'm not going to buy one, because I am already in good shape with the real deal.


I think the good condition carbines are going for about $350, somewhere in that range.


No gas in town today.  Went to the post office and bank, no stations up and running.  The scuttlebutt around town is "maybe there will be gas by the weekend" but nobody can tell you where they heard that.  Some gas came into the Ingles station on Sunday, and it took the police closing off part of the road to keep things orderly. All sold out now though.

Thought for the Day:






26 comments:

  1. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Plenty of fuel down here or $180.00 a gallon.

    Hopefully you guys will get fuel soon.

    'hillery and here bastard husband disrespect normal americans on a regular basis.

    That is one big reason why Trump is doing so well.

    just so you know those commies at google wont capitalize americans but they will capitalize Africans or Canadians. Hmm' makes me think that Kymber already had a talk with them about their editing software.

    I also would find it amusing if North Korea lit up an EMP weapon over the Silicon Valley and the Bay Area and frying google and a great many other companies that are social engineering our culture. Imagine a google executive eating his next door neighbor who was a vegetarian. Too much dark humor:)

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    1. The Clinton's have a long, well established history of contempt and utter disdain for working people. One reason they are constantly embroiled in scandals over finance is their overwhelming need to establish themselves as "rich, upper class" individuals. Hillary in particular treats the staff, such as drivers, maids, guards, etc like serfs. There are several books by people who worked for her that illustrate just how revolting a person she is in this respect (and many others.)

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  2. local news reporting shortages just south of me in danville, va. as people are coming up from n.c. to stock up. they report no gas at all in central/western n.c. gas prices jumped 25 cent a gallon in my neck of the woods but we have plenty available. think i will top off every day while i can.

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    1. My wife and I went to the state park yesterday. People were constantly coming into the camp store asking the clerks where they could get gas, and the answer was "nowhere around here." We drove into town to mail a DVD to our kids, no gas to be had there at all.

      Strangely, the Atlanta Journal Constitution featured an interview with our Governor, Nathan Deal. He said no one had called his office to complain so he did not think the gas shortage was a "big deal."

      Nathan Deal used to be our representative for the 9th District, and he is a good man. You could always go see him, or meet him at a town hall meeting, and if you had a problem he would have one of his staffers get back to you. But he has lost touch with "everyday life" since he became Governor, and this is a good example of it.

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  3. That comic reminds me of the people who think that battery cars are the best thing ever. They just don't want to hear that there aren't enough raw materials on Earth to make these more than a niche vehicle. Not to mention all the oil and coal burned by the power stations to recharge the things.

    I say my Mustang V8 is greener than most cars, because I only put about 2000 miles on it per year.

    - Charlie

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    1. Hey Charlie,

      (captaincrunch)

      Yeah' you got a point. I am impressed with what the Toyota Prius can do and for the amount of room in the vehicle, but the raw materiels and the amount of fuel used to make a hybrid negates many of the benefits.

      A well tuned older vehicle can be superior to the amount of chemicals and other materiels used in a newer one. That's one reason I drive older trucks. The expense in maintaining an older vehicle is lower and parts are more prolific and lower cost too.

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    2. Charlie, my mom drives a Prius. I have tried repeatedly to explain to her that the battery driven hybrids are not the answer to a problem, they are simply a bandaid. But she is 88, and my sister told her that the electric car is the wave of the future, there's no dissuading her. Personally, I want a good, reliable gasoline or diesel engined vehicle. I'm 64 and I figure the fossil fuels will hold out the rest of my lifetime. I don't do much driving anymore, just into town or to the parks.

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    3. not to mention all that lithium that will have to be disposed of. and they don't tell you the whole battery assembly will have to be changed out periodically, at your cost.

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  4. Harry once the city stations are supplied the rural stations will get daily split loads. During Katrina I had a Raceway station I got 3 slit loads of 4000 gallons every 48 Hours. You worked in the industry a dry station is a net loss. Independents hate short drops because it adds a penny + a gallon in freight.

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    1. We are still waiting here. Only one delivery, to the Ingles in town, and it had everybody in there showing their a**, so badly that the town police had to come and regulate traffic flow, and keep the old ladies from scratching each others eyes out.

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  5. G,day Harry,

    It was a big surprise to hear about your fuel shortage, talk about a vulnerable target!

    Down here all of our fuel is delivered by train and tanker semi trailers, can't remember the last time we had a major disruption, lucky you keep a supply on hand.

    Cheers

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    1. Most fuel in the U.S. is moved through pipelines. I don't know of any instance in the world where above ground pipelines have been successfully defended from serious attempts by terrorists to shut them down. Our electric grid is vulnerable, our fuel transportation system is a danger to itself, all of our communications go through three "hubs", and our nuclear power plant security is a bad joke.

      If Blowjama hands over to Shrillery in January, it's going to get a lot worse.

      Delete
  6. I haven't heard of this gas problem anywhere around here. Did they say why?

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    1. Kathy, it's a pipeline in Alabama that blew out a leak and sprayed 365,000 gallons of gasoline out into the environment.

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  7. I read this post first and then went to the older ones. I had no idea. I haven't been on line much and must have missed this on the news.

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    1. There hasn't been much on the national news about it. Most of what I know has come from the Atlanta stations over Direct TV and from reading newspapers on line.

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  8. I like those Lil M1s too. I know the cartridge isn't well thought of in regards to stopping power, but its pretty close to .357 ballistics and THAT one is well thought of. The rifle itself makes a fine carry rifle that isn't very loud, recoils very little and the empties are kicked out very close to you, vs. having to chase the empty case underneath the prickly bush waaay over there.

    I already have enough .22s to deal with without another. regardless of how well it functions. One of my 'high milers' (carried a lot) is an Erma RX22, a Walther PPK copy that functions very well and makes for a very good kit gun. Erma made some good firearms.

    Hope you get some gasoline pretty soon, that is pretty scary.

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    1. I've got a North American Arms Walther P-38 replica in .22 and I have some Ruger .22 pistols, but I don't shoot .22 much.

      The M-1 Carbine is a great weapon for smaller men and for women. It may fire a pistol round, but it was a popular weapon with the military through Viet Nam, so it has to be functional. Somebody is making new ones now, exactly to WW2 spec, but I can't remember who. I know IMI made some in the 1970's with a metal upper hand guard, but these new ones are exact in every detail.

      It's Wednesday now and the wife and I are about to drive into town. I hope there's some gas but listening to the CB it doesn't sound like it.

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  9. Coal is dying, but you don't have to look so cheerful about coal miners being out of work.

    The energy mix is changing and fast. Just in my area we have hydro, biomass electrical plants, windmills and solar. Solar keeps popping up all over the place, and in northern NH of all places. There are farmer's covering barn roofs -harvesting photons to help the dairy survive. Heck, a local pub in town has its whole south facing side covered in panels.

    I've a Ruger 10/22 that I haven't even sighted in yet. (where has the summer gone!) Next month I'm going hunting, no matter what else happens. Really enjoy bagging small game with .22s. Going to take the camper van out into the back country and use it as a mobile camp.

    Finally got around to gassing up my wife's car yesterday. $2.19/gallon, all you want. Guess we really are in a different market. That price is about what it's been going for most of the summer, give or take a nickle.

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    1. We are still without gasoline here. It's Wednesday morning, and my wife and I are about to run into town just to see if there is any. Then we will walk in the park there instead of out at the lake.

      Georgia has six coal fired power plants. Macon , Valdosta, Atlanta, Athens, Rome, and points South will be in bad shape if they shut down. We were going to build some nuclear plants until the Fukishima disaster, but not now. There's lots of solar here but not nearly enough to actually run our communities. We buy electric from the Tennessee Valley Authority, but our Electric Membership Cooperative (who are a bunch of crooks) just had a big article in the paper, crying crocodile tears and telling us rates were going up again.

      I have a Ruger 10/22, nice little gun. I bought banana mags for it, but don't use it much.

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    2. germany and england both figured out solar and wind is not feasible at all. we will continue to subsidize it until we're broke. i won't give up on coal yet. the real science is starting to rise above the global warming crap. real science=observable,measurable,repeatable. not a "study" of made up studies.

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    3. If you get a chance, take a look at "The Long Emergency" by Kunstler. It amplifies what you said, that alternative energy can't in any way, shape or form replace fossil fuels in our society at this stage in our development.

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  10. the solar panels and windmills are good as long as there is sun.
    an enemy who could devise a way to make thick long lasting cloud cover could shut down his opponent.

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    1. None of the alternative energy forms are capable of replacing fossil fuels. They are a band-aid on the problem, and they all have their own issues, as you point out.

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  11. Thanks for visiting.

    The second skink is eating a cricket. First time in my sixty-one years I've ever seen that. He was nervous so I did not get a very good picture. I felt blessed to see that miracle of nature.

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    1. I never knew what those guys ate. God knows there are crickets enough here to feed an army of them.

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