“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Friday, October 14, 2016

Friday

 It's boiled peanut time up here.  You can buy them by the road, for about a dollar a sack.

If you've never had boiled peanuts, you are missing a real treat. They are messy, but they sure are good.

Strangely, given that this is Georgia, most of the raw peanuts that people have in their little  peanut stands for boiling come from New Mexico.  Never have figured that out, but there must be some reason.






Produce is getting scarce now, the season is about over. But you can still buy lots of jars of jelly, jam, and vegetables.  Lots of big jugs of cider, too.




There's one more big weekend here, starting tomorrow. Then the leaf season will be over, and from that point until June, it will be very quiet . Today in town the traffic was so bad we couldn't even get to the library. Our town is not configured for steady streams of traffic, so if you come in on a side road and no one will let you out, you are just stuck.


This will be our second winter when we are both retired, and don't have to worry about getting out if there is a heavy snow. I am looking forward to it.  It's never more peaceful up here on the mountain than when we have a big snow in the dead of winter. It's so quiet you can hear the falling snow hitting on the snow already on the ground. It might sound implausible, but it's true.



So, just this one more tourist weekend to get through, and it will be back like it used to be 30 years ago.


Thought for the Day:








24 comments:

  1. I think MOST of us country folks have heard the snow fall. A lot of city folks don't get that opportunity. As for traffic, there seem to be precious few ladies and gentlemen anymore.

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    1. We still have a traffic circle at the courthouse, where the two old main roads into the county cross. Then the town is divided up into little side streets. It's understood that if there is a lot of traffic, and someone needs to get out of a side street, you let them out. But when the tourists are up here, they don't know that, or just don't care. I had to back up and turn around and just go on out of town the other day because it was not possible to get out of a side street and on to where I wanted to go. I will be so glad when it's just local people and the pace of life slows down.

      Sometimes I bundle up at night when it's snowing, and go out on the porch , smoke my pipe, and just watch the snow come down. The only sound is the creek and the wind in the pines. If I'm really lucky, and the snow is that hard, crunchy kind of flake, I can hear it hitting in the trees and on the snow on the ground. Nothing quite like it.

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  2. I hate having to worry about getting out in snow. It really stresses me out. That would be a huge advantage of retirement!
    I have never had boiled peanuts or seen them for sale here. Virginia is a peanut state but that is more towards the eastern part of the state... Not here in the mountains.

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    1. Lisa, when I was working, I had to go through all sorts of logistical evolutions to get over the mountain to the town where my office was. Sometimes the road was almost impassible over the mountains, and once I wrecked my truck trying to do that. The other thing was worrying about getting home in the evening. It's so nice now to just listen to the weather report, and think that it doesn't matter. I still park a vehicle down at the foot of the mountain for emergencies when a big snow is coming, but there's no pressure anymore. Even if the power goes out, we are fine. We have the generator, and our heat is propane (no digital controls, only analog so we don't need power to run our heat), and I have kerosene heaters , a wood stove in the lower level, a wood stove in the kitchen , and the big Tennessee fieldstone fireplace. Winter is a good time for us.

      Have you never had boiled peanuts!!! You have to make some for yourself, your husband and the boys. You just get raw peanuts, boil up a big stock pot of very salty water on the stove, and then boil the raw peanuts until the shells are very soft. Once you start eating them, it's hard to stop but you have to be careful as they can give you a stomach ache if you eat too many.

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  3. Things are more quiet here, too. Or as quiet as it can be in a town. I am about finished with the Farmer's Market produce, still having some squash and pumpkin in the freezer from last year. I would like to get my hands on a couple bushels of apples to can and make into apple butter. There is a freeze warning out for tonight which means that the orchards will be finished with the pick-your-own crowd and should have boxed apples cheaper than before a frost.

    It isn't quiet enough to hear the snowfall, but I once lived where that was possible. Even so, there is something about a blanket of white, before people are out and about walking and driving through it, that makes even a place like my town somewhat beautiful.

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    1. Vicki, I have always thought your place sounded very snug and cozy. You can look out and see the world going by, but you are still safe and protected up there.

      When I lived in Albuquerque, New Mexico as a young man I liked to go out walking at night when it snowed. The campus was surrounded by middle class residences, and the people burned mesquite wood in their fireplaces. There was a little park, called Bataan Park, where I could sit in a sheltered picnic area , watch the snow fall, and smell the good wood smoke smell all around. It does make just about everything soft and clean looking.

      You've done really well this year with your canning. I think you have added more to your supplies than I have, and most of what I added, I just bought. Not the same thing at all. But one of these days we may start canning. My last attempt was abortive but we did try a garden this summer and plan to do better next spring and summer.

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  4. I guess I'm a northerner. Boiled peanuts are inedible. In fact, they are a waste of a good peanut that could have been roasted. Tried them and wondered if I had gotten a bad batch. Nope. That's how they are supposed to taste.

    We had a our last farmer's market a few weeks back. The nights are frosty. Tomorrow we are going to have some sun so my lovely wife and I hope to get some yard work down before the snow flies. However, I'm keeping my boat in the water until the last minute.

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    1. I'm truly surprised. I can't imagine how someone could not like boiled peanuts. But then, the Scots eat Hagis, so I guess it's a cultural thing. ;-)

      Once this weekend is over all the road side places will close up. The parks will go on winter staffing, and the population of the county will go back down to about 15,000 as the tourists and snowbirds flee the coming cold.

      I don't blame you. Sailing up there, with your leaf season as beautiful as it is, must be a memorable experience.

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  5. As no Peanuts are grown here, I've never eaten a boiled one. I presume they are boiled fresh from the ground?

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    1. Yes. You buy a big nylon sack of raw peanuts. Then you boil a big stock pot of very salty water on the stove. Once it's at a rolling boil you pour in the raw peanuts and boil them until the shells are very soft and slick. It's a great treat. I can remember sitting on the porch of my grandma's house and we would eat the boiled peanuts and throw the shells over the side of porch. The shells are boiled so soft the chickens would peck them up. I guess they liked the salt.

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  6. Ah, solitude in a snowy landscape... I remember it well. There is no silence in the world to comapre it to.

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    1. That's true. Up here when the snow sets in, it's like you are the only people on the planet.

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  7. Once its quite, life will be great again Right??

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    1. Life up here is always pretty nice. There's something good about every season, and the forest is always secluded.

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  8. I'm not sure I can imagine boiled peanuts, it's pretty cool you can still buy things by the roadside though!

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    1. Kirsty, I don't know if they sell raw peanuts in England. Thinking on it, I never saw any the times I was there. But if they do, once your home is all finished and you have time, give it a try. Just boil a big stock pot of water to rolling boil, add a quarter of a pound of salt, then put in raw peanuts and boil them until the shells are soft. I bet you would really enjoy them. They are considered a delectable snack here. I usually just buy some at a roadside stand but I've made them right here at the house when my family came to visit.

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  9. I never heard of boiled peanuts....are they boiled in water or oil? Guess I will have to look it up on Google. There is solitude here, too, and I like that. We don't have the tourists like you do. A tornado touched down on the coast of Oregon this morning....hope your folks are OK. We finally got some rain, but the wind was howling like crazy and now we have a wind warning. Really weird weather.

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    1. They're boiled in salty water. I bet you could whip some up there in the kitchen in short order. If you don't like them, the chickens will eat them so they won't go to waste. You have to crack them open for the chickens though. They like the soft shells, too.

      I hadn't heard about the tornado in Oregon, but nobody has called here so nothing must have happened to any of my family. Thanks for mentioning it, I'll call my mom today and see if she heard about it.

      Still no rain here. We are getting nervous about our well but it is still drawing fine as of the moment.

      I remember being out there around where you live , and how quiet and still the area was. Plus you could see forever there. I think that would be a fine place to live.

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    2. So you boil peanuts in the shell? Actually there are no peanuts here in the stores....maybe later in the year. Sometimes I see them in the shell, but mostly roasted and shelled. Big storms on the west coast....lots of power outages and heavy rain in Seattle. We got some, too....but you know, up here in the high desert a lot of rain is about 1/4 inch or so. But it is nice and the air smells clean and fresh. It was dead still last night, even the coyotes were quiet.

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    3. Yes, you boil raw peanuts, unshelled, in salty water til the shells are very soft. There are big bags of raw peanuts for sale here in all the grocery stores in season.

      I have been watching the storms out there. I can do without the wind but we sure could use some rain. I am getting a little apprehensive about our well.

      Two of the best things about living way out there. No noises, and at night there's no light pollution to spoil your view of the night sky.

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  10. We used to boil peanuts. Even up until a few years ago, my sister had her friend in Charleston send about 5 pounds whenever they were in season.
    - Charlie

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    1. Charlie, until my kids moved on, boiling peanuts here was an every weekend event in season. After they left, my wife and I don't boil them up very often anymore but we buy a couple of bags along the road when we are out kaboodling, like we did today after our walk at the park. Just the right thing

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  11. I love the sound of falling snow. Most places are too noisy to hear the beauty of it.

    The green outer hull will split and reveal the brown shell of delicious pecans. The black walnuts are equally good but harder to open.

    We have no choice on the roof repairs either. We do what we gotta do, I guess.

    Have a blessed week.

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    1. I told my wife I thought those pod looking things we saw on the ground at the park were walnuts, but I wasn't sure.

      It's way too risky today to hire someone to fix a roof, because here if someone gets hurt working on your house your homeowners insurance doesn't cover it. I don't know about other places in that regard. Also, I still want to do as much as I can on my own.

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