Truth.

A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within.

Ariel Durant

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Ride Sally, Ride! I wonder why the people in the audience aren't shouting out "Seig Heil! Seig Heil!"










I listened to that sick puppy give her speech, and I thought to myself, this is what happens when the states close down all the public mental health institutions.  Mentally ill people go to the ER at the local hospital, but if they don't have insurance , they aren't accepted at the private mental health facilities. So after three days at the hospital, they just get turned loose again. And wind up with the Democratic National Committee.



Did some more shooting off the front porch today, and did much better. I just wore my regular prescription glasses. I know this is not wise, but I was feeling frustrated. I do some of my best work when I'm angry.  I have stopped watching NBC, ABC, and CBS and should start having lower blood pressure soon. If I can maintain.  I've tried to stop watching those twits before, and relapsed. It's like wiggling a loose tooth. You know it's counter productive but it's hard to stop.




I need to start thinking about the garden for this spring. I have some seeds friends have sent me, and I plan to plant those. I also want to plant Indian corn, and potatoes.  I'm not going the raised bed route this year. I tried that last time and while everything grew, all I got that I could eat was tomatoes. 




So this year, I'm going to till up the ground and mix fertilizer in with it. We just have hard, red clay up here, full of flint. It's not the best and still other people get good gardens going. I bought a little book that might be useful as a guideline.  Now I just have to read it.



I've always been very weak in gardening.  For one thing, I don't enjoy it. It's a chore and God knows I have enough chores. But my wife likes it very much, so that makes it easier. She really enjoys having a garden and working in it. I go out and help her so it's something we can do together. We  don't have a whole lot of interests we share. She likes to sew, and cook, and shop. I like to reload and shoot. The more things we can do together the better. Especially since she is retired now. 




Life is good here. I know I've been all cranked up by politics, but it's because I know well enough that what happens these days in that arena will affect me and my family. Also, I'm not tolerant of people who not only share none of my values, but want to force me to adopt theirs and to live by them. But still, overall, life here in the mountains is good. 



Thought for the Day:











49 comments:

  1. I saw this today on Fox News. All I can say is someone in her family used some kind of drug and it is affecting her in life.

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    1. And people say Zombies are "made up." I watch something like this and I wonder how many of these toads are out there....

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    2. Harry-She is totally looney tunes and a disgrace to her sex and race. I have a family member who, unfortunately, has gone over to the "dark" side. I find it disgusting and offensive. Guess she is the poster girl for the DNC Jana

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    3. Jana,it does hurt when a family member goes living dead. I have a cousin who is a big Hillary fan. He's lawyer who has been married six times and gotten rich by getting criminals off, especially drug dealers.

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  2. Replies
    1. I'm thinking she should go to Atlanta, and go down to Spring Street on a Friday or Saturday night. There she could interact with people of color and learn by the experience. It would be good for her and good for normal people, too. She would certainly "learn" from the experience.

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    2. She is the product of our wonderful PUBLIC education system, populated with Marxist liberals and unions. Get the liberal feds out of our schools

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    3. It's really strange you mentioned that. I was thinking this morning, that I wonder how much of this kind of stupidity I'm responsible for? I taught for three years. I worked really hard to counteract all the socialist B.S. our school taught, but I was limited in what I could do. The text books were all from New York or California, and especially the reading books and the social studies books were outright left wing propaganda. The rules at the school were all calculated to inculcate good socialist values, like "don't think for yourself, let your superiors do that" and "don't act for yourself, find a superior to tell you what to do." I quit after three years. I went in to sign my contract on the pricipal's desk, and I picked up the pen. Then I put it down and said "I just can't do this anymore!" Walked out of the office.

      All this crap was imposed on our rural school system by the Department of Education in Atlanta. Staffed by extreme left wing "educators" most of whom had never taught a single day in classroom.

      You are so right. I wish more people knew what public schools are like, even those without children should take an interest because you have no idea what they are teaching the children. It's not the teachers fault, most of them are primarily interested in keeping their jobs, not in politics.

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    4. I taught for 30 years in an Eastern Oregon rural school district. Started out in an even smaller one. The first two textbooks I was issued I assigned work out of, in addition to my own lessons, until I found out the next year that it was the same text the students had had the year before (I taught freshman science at the time (both Life Science and Earth Science). After I found that out I stopped assigning things out of the text, never went back to them. I was 'forced' to issue a text to my students, so I did, but then I told them that they could take them home or keep them in their locker, just don't bring them to class. Did the same as I progressed throughout my career and began teaching more advanced classes. Not as much politics in science until you start dealing with Evolution or Climate Change. But I noted that the new teachers coming in....were indoctrinated.

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    5. My parents were both career teachers, but that was in the 1950's and 1960's. I think it just about killed my father. He always regretted leaving the Navy after WW2, said he should have stayed in like my Uncle.

      I tried teaching after my military service. I honestly thought I could do some good. Three years in the classroom cured me of that illusion.

      Sounds like you adapted and survived!

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  3. Got the radio yesterday, Harry.

    As soon as I do some garage "dewatering" and fix some minor storm damage here I'll start on it.

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    1. I saw the pictures on your blog and I was horrified. I'm glad it didn't get into the house. I hope it didn't trash your foundation, either. Seems like if it isn't one thing, it's another. I've been sulking about having to clean up all the trees and debris from the storms here recently, but if I had to put up with flooding I'd probably just stroke out.

      I like that radio a lot, but it's pretty old and I do have another just like it that works, so if you can't fix it, it's ok. I still appreciate your trying. Don't worry about how long it takes for you to get to it, I think it took me a couple of months just to mail it!

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  4. I got a minute and a half in to that video and it is all I can take. What a moronic idiot. Someone ought ship her of to Cuba, Venezuela or Sudan and make her live there for a few years so she can learn a thing or two about oppression.

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    1. I was thinking her problem is nothing that a trip down to Spring Street in Atlanta, on a Friday or Saturday night, couldn't cure. She could interact with all the people of color she wanted to, and that would be the end of her. She'll probably be chosen to chair the DNC. As I remember, wasn't the last one a white woman who made herself up to look black and told everyone she was black?

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  5. It's funny you posted this today.

    I sent an e-mail to this loon this morning. Since she's from my home state, I had more reason to. I basically told her that she was an embarrassment to the hard working "white" people of Idaho. And that if she ever tried to bring her cultural Marxism to this side of the state, I would fight her. Furthermore, I said she is welcome to try and "shut me down". Good luck with that, snowflake.

    I also told her she was a racist...now that should really get under her skin.

    --Troy

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    1. I thought of you when I saw she was from Idaho. But even a great state like Idaho is going to have some brain dead people. I know someone who runs a PR company in Idaho and it's loaded with people just like this idiot.

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    2. She's gotta be a Kalifornia transplant living in Boise. Too many of them moving here trying to change everything. Grrr!

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    3. I'm surely familiar with that phenomenon. I seriously doubt anyone so mentally and morally impaired could have originated in Idaho.

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  6. Hi Harry, As you know I skip your politics, but isn't it good that I don't try to change your mind and you come by and visit my blog to say hello and enjoy my pictures of nature in the mountains here? I'm looking forward to see how your gardening goes. Or should I say grows? Errol was very good at it, but I don't have the energy any longer and way too many gophers to kill should I try to have a garden of my own. Maybe some containers, we'll see.

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    1. Inger, I think as a widow with no kids you are entitled to skip politics. You're smart to do that. If I didn't have kids I think I would be a lot less vehement about it all. But after I am gone, they will still have to live here and so I stay involved.

      I like your pictures of the place you live. It's exactly what I always had in mind, but things worked out so that I wound up here in the woods. You know how it is, the grass is always greener....

      I'm mainly going to work harder on the gardening because my wife likes it, and I like the fresh food.

      I like gophers! Did you know that back here, a gopher is a turtle looking thing, and not a little animal? It's true.

      When I was a kid and lived in Northern California, my dad didn't like the gophers because they made holes in his lawn. He would put these horrific traps in there. When I got home from school I would spring them with a stick, before he got home. He always thought the traps were defective.

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  7. Hey Harry! Accompanying the garden, I would personally start exploring native edible vegetation, and when the typical harvesting times. In Arkansas, we've got Mulberry trees, wild blackberry bushes, Muscadine vines galore, Polk salad (young shoots only), dandelions, acorns after leaching the tannins, and many other foragable flora. I imagine that with your shooting skills, and some native plant identification, you could do quite well in complementing your larder. The way I look at it, with all the land around you, it would be a wise to locate the harvestable areas.

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    1. K, some years back, I got bored and I took a job at the state park, working at the boat dock or in the camp office. They sold books then, and several of them were on the flora and fauna of the area. I bought a good one, but it's a sure cure for insomnia. I probably ought to try to read it. I did read a series of books about prehistoric man, the "Children of the Earth series". Each book was about 800 pages long and there were six of them. They weren't very good. They were written by a woman for women, but the subject interested me. So I kept reading, waiting for something interesting to happen, but it never did.

      However, the author was fascinated with hunting and gather life styles, and she loaded the book with vivid descriptions of useful plants, using the modern names, where to find them, how to use them, how to prepare them. There was so much of that I started skipping over it all. I gave the books to the humane society when I finished them, but I wonder if I should have kept them. They would have made a great reference for what you're talking about here.

      As for hunting, we have lots of deer and turkey here. Lots of squirrels and rabbits. But we are just a few hours from Atlanta by the four lane, and I suspect the mountains near roads would be hunted out in short order in an emergency. However, people never go far from roads, and there are thousands of acres of national forest here with no road and trails. So if you could pack the meat out hunting there might be viable.

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  8. There's quite a few news sources I can't listen to either. I get so sick of the baloney. I am glad to hear you're going to give gardening a go this year! It's hard building soil, but hopefully that book will help out.

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    1. It's something the wife and I can do together, and hopefully grow a little food to boot. I liked the tomatoes we grew last year. Everything else blossomed out but no food grew on the plants. I don't know why.

      It's a cheap hobby and you don't have to leave home!

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    2. Believe it or not clay soil is very high in nutrients for the plants. It's just hard for them to be able to uptake the nutrients from clay. You need to till in organic matter, like compost to loosen the soil. I had to do that where I live. We have very heavy clay/shale soil here. If you have room somewhere you could make a simple compost pile. Nothing fancy. I run over my dead leaves in the fall with a lawnmower without the bagger attached. Then put the bagger on and collect them. This chops them up really fine. Then when I cut the grass in the spring and summer I mix the clippings in with the leaves. A lot of people think that compost stinks because they have smelled piles of grass clipping that are rotting. Nothing could be further from the truth. Grass clipping by themselves decompose very quickly and clump up into a slimy mess. It's the lack of oxygen in the pile that causes rot from anaerobic bacteria and the sewage smell. When they are mixed with dead leaves and other brown things oxygen helps the aerobic bacteria to compost everything. Compost smells very sweet like rich earth. Another thing is don't put any meat or fish and milk products into the pile. While these are rich in nutrients, that stuff will rot and stink to high heaven. You can put egg shells in it though. Very high in calcium. Calcium helps prevent blossom end rot on the tomatoes. You can buy sacks of organic compost, but it's a bit pricey. Gardeners call it black gold. Easy enough to make your own. Throw in your coffee grounds and vegetable peelings, too. Every week or so mix up the pile with a garden fork or pitchfork. Depending on conditions you could have your own homemade compost in anywhere from a few weeks to a couple months. No need to use bought fertilizer anymore. With your heavy clay soil most of the fertilizer won't make to to the roots anyway. A lot will just get washed away when it rains. Even if you mix it into the soil it will just get trapped in the clay. Another benefit of mixing organic matter into the soil is that it lets water soak down to the plant roots where it's needed. Hope this helps.

      A tip on corn. You need to plant more than one row or plant a few plants in a loose clump with enough spacing between the plants. Pollen is on the tassels and the plants need to cross pollinate with each other to form an ear. Most of the pollination is done by wind. If you have only one row them there is a lot less chance of pollination.

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    3. Clearly you have been gardening for awhile. I don't have much to put into a compost pile. I don't have a lawn, though I do mow my meadow and it is in grass. I would have to rake up the mown grass out there, but it could be done. The chickens eat all of our vegetable scraps and egg shells, while the dogs and cats eat any kitchen left overs. My dogs like bread and mashed or boiled potatoes.
      On the other hand,I have vast quantities of chicken manure and I plan to mix that into the soil when I till this spring.
      You're certainly on the mark about buying soil to garden in. Our last attempt involved a lot of that, and I figure each tomato we got out of the effort cost a little over eight dollars to produce. But that was an experiment.
      I really appreciate your taking the time to write your comment. There's a great deal of actionable information in it. Especially since your soil type approximates the soil we have here.

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    4. I like your $8 tomato comment. I have a similar one. When we first moved to our new home I planted a garden and put up a 3 ft high fence to keep the bunnies out. That same year as soon as the tomatoes started ripening some deer jumped the fence and destroyed the whole garden. The next spring I spent $1500 to have a 6 ft chain link fence installed. So basically I spent $1500 to grow $30 worth of tomatoes.........

      Chicken manure is probably one of the all time best. Just make sure that it's composted down and not fresh. Fresh stuff is too "hot" and will burn your plants. It actually releases heat as it decomposes. If you want to use fresher manure you could till it into the soil after you harvest in late summer/early fall to give it time to break down before your spring planting. Happy gardening........

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  9. I heard Rush Limbaugh today...he was begging the DNC to make her the chairman. Said she was EIB endorsed. Pretty funny.
    I just can't believe some folks are allowed to walk around without a straight jacket.

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    1. Suz, she's clearly demented. We have a big mental illness problem in this country and she's a good example of the kind of pathetic creatures wandering around out there who are deranged and hopeless.

      I listen to Rush every day from noon until three, except on Fridays when the show has all the call in's. Sometimes I miss it but if I'm home, I listen. I realize his personality takes a little getting used to, but his news is invariably on target.

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  10. Harry,

    When you mentioned you were shooting your guns off the front porch, and had enough of ABC, NBC, & CBS I pictured you shooting your TV......LOL!!!! Like you, we all have had enough of the fake news, and the political BS.

    Gardening is a way to relieve stress, relax, and grow your own vegetables. This year, I'm going to try planting directly in the ground with added soil, compost, and peat.



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    1. Like Elvis, huh! I need a new TV anyway. I have an old one and my wife wants a flat screen. But I know the cats would knock it off and smash it the first day...

      I'm trying your style of gardening this time around. The raised beds cost a lot of money, and for whatever reason they were only marginally successful. I put bags of soil in them from Home Depot, that was labeled as gardening soil. Something else must have gone wrong.

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  11. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)


    Donald Trump got more (overweight) women out walking in one day than Michelle Obama did in eight years in the White House:)

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    1. Yeah, at least, I think they were women. With a lot of them, it was kind of hard to tell.

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  12. SMH!!! I looked at my family Saturday night ( other then Libby and I am the only female in the house) and apologized for the acts of my fellow females... I told the boys we are not all like that and don't judge us by a bunch of snowflakes...After all I did do the math! lmao

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    1. There are bad apples on every tree. I'm sure none of the males in your household would ever think of you and that buffoon in the same light. I sure wouldn't! ;-)

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  13. I am also weak in gardening but never tired to try it again and again..

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    1. Well, I guess every time we try something and it doesn't work out, we get a little bit better at it. Our gardening certainly hasn't been anything to brag about, but we have high hopes.

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  14. We were watching the show, The Man in the High Castle. It was interesting. The title of your post reminded me of that.

    Travis has been doing raised beds. Last year he did layers: wet cardboard, mulch, compost (we keep that too), crushed oak leaves, dirt + repeat layers then plant. It was so easy! Weeds don't get in, and there's no digging.

    We planted popcorn, kale, potatoes, basil, tomatoes, cabbage, peppers, strawberries, our juneberry bushes, and possibly more - but that's all I remember. I felt like we had so much processing with the tomatoes!

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    1. We didn't do the layers with our raised boxes. I just built them, then we poured in the "garden soil" we bought at Home Depot. After that, we bought "set ups", plants that were already growing. The roots were in little mesh bags. You just set them in the soil and away you went. At least, that's how it was supposed to be. We watered them, but as someone pointed out, sunshine may have been our problem. I live on a mountain top, but there are higher mountains all around me. It makes for a nice view, but it blocks the sun most of the day.

      I just ate the tomatoes off the vine last year. They were so good, and it was like eating an apple or something similar.

      We didn't have much variety, but that was because I got tired of building boxes. This year, I am going to till up the soil at the top of the meadow and we will have more space to plant more vegetables.

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  15. I would have thought you would do well growing beans for drying/storage, seems maybe that aspect of gardening could marry up with your interests? hope you and yours are all well

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    1. Hey, TW. I have been following your efforts to start a community garden there in Spain. Bravo Zulu to you for taking the time and effort. Since most of the people in that village are old, I don't know how much help you will get out of them.

      I have never tried beans but people do raise them here as I see the poles in gardens alongside the road.

      We are doing fine. My wife is up North with the kids for a bit, and I am hanging out here doing not much of anything.

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  16. That's they type of gardening book I want to write! Maybe one day!

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    1. Kev, you could self publish on Amazon for no money. I'm sure people would buy a book like that. I sure would. There aren't many that deal expressly with survival gardening.

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  17. I wonder how many hours of sun your vegetable garden gets. They look a little bit starved for sunlight.

    Best regards

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    1. J.M. I am pretty sure that was one of the problems. I live up on a mountain top, but all around me are much higher mountains. They block the sun, especially in winter. In 1999 I built this hyper expensive integrated solar power system up here. Diesel generator and massive solar panels hooked into a battery array through an inverter. Then after all that, it turned out that even out in the meadow, there wasn't enough sunlight to make the system work without the generator. I finally just ditched the batteries when they wore out, shut down the inverter, and now I just use the generator when I need to. I am not sure what to do about the sun, we chose the sunniest spot to put our boxes last year, and there is less sun up at the top of the meadow where I plan to plant this year.

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  18. use the raised bed for a short fat type of carrot, and other root vegetables.
    notice branches hanging over the bed. got to cut those back.

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    1. I tried squash and watermelons, the plants grew really well but they didn't make any squash or watermelons! I'm going to try potatoes this spring, beets and onions. I'll try some carrots too, although I only like them cut up in stew.

      My house and outbuildings are completely surrounded by giant oaks and poplars, which help keep the sun off the place in summer when it's so brutally hot. But where we put the beds last time was shaded part of the day and that was surely part of the trouble. I'm planning on disking up a part of the upper meadow, that's the place where we get the most sun, though even that is shaded about half the day.

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  19. i'm with the viking....you know, i'm beginning to believe that chilean military video of the ufo spraying something into the air is real, like spraying dumb-ass sauce or something over all the universities. the thing was all but invisible to the eye but the flir was seeing it clearly. guess it could be some .gov program. cue the x-files music....

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    1. As am I. I don't feel one iota of "guilt" about anything to do with race. My wife and I worked like dogs for many years to have what we have. I got my first paying job when I was 14. I've never been to prison because I don't do things like sell drugs. Slavery has existed since mankind came on the scene, and still does today. I don't feel badly because my ancestors practiced it. Though I am willing to admit that if we had not imported slaves to this country we would all be light years better off today.

      I saw that video. In fact, it was just on the news pages on the net not long ago. I've never been a "chemtrail" believer but I don't think we are alone in the universe.

      Trust No One! ;-)

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