Quote of the Day


Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Big Brother is Listening. Stand By to Stand By.



"Binney is the NSA executive who created the agency’s mass surveillance program for digital information, who served as the senior technical director within the agency, who managed six thousand NSA employees.
He was a 36-year NSA veteran widely regarded as a “legend” within the agency and the NSA’s best-ever analyst and code-breaker.
Binney also mapped out the Soviet command-and-control structure before anyone else knew how, and so predicted Soviet invasions before they happened (“in the 1970s, he decrypted the Soviet Union’s command system, which provided the US and its allies with real-time surveillance of all Soviet troop movements and Russian atomic weapons”).
Binney told Washington's Blog:
NSA has all the data through the Upstream programs (Fairview/Stormbrew/Blarney)  [background] and backed up by second and some third party country collection.

Plus the FBI and CIA plus others, as of the last month of the Obama administration, have direct access to all the NSA collection (metadata and content on phones,email and banking/credit cards etc.) with no attempt at oversight by anybody [background]. This is all done under Executive Order 12333 [the order which allows unlimited spying no matter what intelligence officials claim] ....

FBI would only ask for a warrant if they wanted to be able to take it into court at some point given they have something meaningful as evidence. This is clearly true given the fact the President Trump's phone conversations with other country leaders were leaked to the mainstream media.
In other words, Binney is saying that Trumps phones were bugged by the NSA without a warrant - remember, top NSA whistleblowers have previously explained that the NSA is spying on virtually all of the digital communications of Americans. - and the NSA shared the raw data with the CIA, FBI and other agencies."

Zero Hedge News





Meanwhile....







My mother in law has been moved to a hospice. No one knows what is going to happen, everyone has their own plan they want everybody else to adhere to.  Right now I'm at home waiting for the next flurry of directives.

Thought for Today:
























17 comments:

  1. With all this massive electronic surveillance capacity I don't know if is ever possible to put the Genie back in the bottle. As wee see it is impossible to prevent the participants from going rouge if they are inclined.

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    1. it is possible, if only we had the will. when they see their cohorts swinging from the lamp posts, the genie will be back in the bottle, until the next generation at least. as they say, freedom must be refreshed with blood. never said the blood had to fall on the battlefield did it?

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    2. It's aggravating to think that these Dark State toads have been doing this for so long, completely illegally, and not only have they gotten away with doing it, they still are. All this about warrants is just nonsensical. They don't have to take people to court to destroy them, they just need to surreptitiously furnish information illegally gathered to some slimy, sleaze bag journalist or politician as they did with General Flynn.


      The Nazis did exactly that to remove a German General who opposed them. They found out his wife had been a prostitute during the post World War One period when people were starving to death. They released the news by leaking it to the press. The General had to resign from the Army and was replaced by a more malleable individual. The Schumerites are using the same despicable tactics today.

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  2. prayers for you and the misses...as to the nsa et al, got my ak today....nuff said.

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    1. Somebody needs to raise"the rabble" and clean house in D.C. But where is Someone to play Robin Hood to President Trump's Richard the Lion Hearted?

      I like my mother-in-law. She's a good old woman and was always kind to me. She's very religious,and she isn't afraid of death. She believes she is going to heaven to be with my father in law. She's been in bad shape for quite awhile now. My wife is a believer too, so though she's sad about her mom leaving, she feels like she will be young and well and with her husband again. It's just all the chaos and friction that is bugging me.

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  3. Harry I hope your mother in law has a peaceful time in hospice. It will be harder on the family than on her. My mother in law had hospice but said she would see her 85th birthday . She lasted 5 peaceful weeks and passed on her 85Th birthday taking a nap.
    All these accusations from both sides are unprovable without admitting publicly how spied on EVERYONE is. I think its all distractions for something Trump is planning. If he has the media on overload something big will be lost in the blathering.

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  4. Gary, Damn straight. I already had a knock down drag out on the phone with my daughter, who is as butt headed as I am. It's the first time in my life I told my daughter what we were going to do in a family situation and she said no. Guess she isn't daddy's little girl anymore. Probably a good thing, though I'll never tell her that. :-)

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  5. I moved in with my mother for her last 2 months of life, and acted as her hospice nurse. I tell you, it was an honor to serve her in that way.

    Yeah, it was embarrassing for about the first day or so, and then Mom basically laughed and said what the hell, I changed you so I guess you can change me.

    My Mom decided her own course of action and I just backed her up. She also looked at her death as "going home", so it was as peaceful and stress-free as I guess it could get.

    Sounds like your wife and her Mom are pretty much on the same page, and I guess everyone else should respect the Mom's wishes, and if they disagree then keep it unsaid.

    Wishing the best for you and yours in this tough time. Sounds like you're going to be eating a lot of Cup-A-Noodles, though...

    - Charlie

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  6. Charlie, takes some courage and an unselfish nature to do that.

    My mother in law has a nice granny house next to my sister-in-law and her husband's place.They are both doctors so they can pull strings at the hospital when necessary to take care of her. She has been living for several years now with a full time paid day caregiver, and at night she has a call button and my sister in law can be there in just a few minutes. When my sister-in-law has to go out of town, my wife goes over and stays. Up to a year ago when she retired, my wife was a teacher in that town and stayed with her mom week nights. The other siblings live too far away to help.

    Ever so often things get bad with the mother in law and we all think this is it, but this time looks like end game. I am just waiting it out. I usually just keep quiet and do what I can to help, but it's a little more complicated this time around. It'll work itsef out I guess.

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  7. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)


    'Sorry about your mother in law. I guess your just along for the ride on this one. I don't know how your family is but I have seen families start to 'take things' out of the dying persons house before they were deceased. That's the only words of wisdom I can conjure up. 'Hopefully your mother in law already made arrangements in that area.

    One the CIA, government spying. They have become the 'global laughingstock' that gets no respect. Its so sad its actually comical.
    'Mark my words though 'Harry. These are signs of a failing society.

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    1. I don't think anyone would be tacky enough to do that. My sister in law will have to handle clearing out my mother in laws possessions. I would think most of it would go to the Salvation Army, as none of us need anything in the house. She has a wide screen tv and a computer that are valuable, but the rest of her possessions are just household items. I'm not in the market for any of that stuff.

      Taking things out of the house before a person goes can backfire. When my grandma on my dad's side died, my aunt started cleaning out the house which was dreadfully cluttered. One of the first things she threw away was stacks of old magazines like National Geographic. Then just before she died, my grandma told my Uncle to be sure to not throw out the magazines as she had been hiding tens and twenties in the magazines for years, out of fear of another bank crash!

      I just want to make sure everybody knows that the Shadow State really is reading your mail, listening to your phones, etc. For years people told me that and I ridiculed them. Not in America, I said. That's just a bunch of conspiracy theory nuts.

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  8. I am so sorry to hear about your mother-in-law. Hospice is such a wonderful thing. The nurses are so kind and respectful of the patient and the family. Prayers for all of you-Jana

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    1. It'll settle down at some point. Right now, everybody is in a Tizzy. My sister in law has been taking care of the MIL for years, so she gets to be the generalissimo, but she's having problems with one of her sisters (not my wife) and my wife's brother is just bewildered and drifting around.

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  9. This is why it is a good idea to have an advance directive to tell everyone what you want done. Of course, you have to have one family member who will inforce it. That way, there is no dispute. Put in writing everything you want done for a funeral, in detail. Also how far you want to go with hospice. Some places keep you alive no matter what cause they get more money that way. (I saw this happen when I worked in a hospital). So....do it your way to the end and nobody can say anything to the contrary.

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    1. Well, it ought to work that way. But when my dad went, he had done all that. My little brother didn't like some of what my dad wanted though, and there was a lot of tension between him and my middle brother, who was the executor of the estate. I certainly think you are right though, anybody who doesn't take those steps is making a generally bad situation fraught with the peril of infighting.

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  10. My husband always thinks there's someone watching. I generally think he's too paranoid. It is possible that they are. They certainly could watch you at any time. Do they really want to focus on a family that doesn't have a whole lot of power? I kind of feel like they have bigger fish to fry - so to speak.

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    1. I think there is always a computer listening and reading. But something would have to bring a human into the loop to get a person in trouble. It's illegal to intimate a threat, for instance, so if someone was gunning for you, and you had said, in whatever context, anything that seems to be a threat, the feds could then use that to do away with you. That's where the risk lies, seems to me.

      The FBI is very fond of arresting any old Joe S*it the Ragman, on any trumped up charge, then getting face time on the MSM, and later just dropping the charges and letting the person go when there's no more use for them.

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