Truth.

"A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within."

Ariel Durant

Monday, May 8, 2017

Down to the falls. Slow times on the mountain.


My wife and I went to the waterfall today.  I didn't want her to get worn out, so we drove the Jeep down there instead of walking. This is the first , or bottom fall. There are two higher ones in this location.


There are two creeks you have to ford between the house and the falls. The forest service road is not maintained anymore, and hasn't been for many years. This can be tricky. It isn't that there's so much water flooding through the creeks this time of year, as that the banks keep getting steeper.  This is the first ford, where two creeks flow together.   The second is not as wide, but the far bank is about to the point where I am going to have to go down there with a shovel and pick and work on it if I want to keep driving on that road.


This is the pool at the bottom of the falls. It's deep enough behind me to swim in, and my kids used to come down here and swim when they were at home. The water is pretty cold, though.


This is the second fall.


 This is the first fall. The water really comes roaring down it, and it's very steep. If you are courageous enough, you can follow a trail to the right, to the top of it. We settled for just walking up to the foot of the fall.  The pool at the bottom of the first fall is the deepest of the three.


It's a pretty place, even in summer when the air is hot and humid, it's cool down here by the falls. The water is pure, and because this is off the beaten path you don't have people throwing their trash all over the place. 


I'd really rather walk down here, because I don't like leaving my vehicle by the forest service road, and you can't see it from the falls. But my wife has asthma attacks sometimes, and I don't want to have her off in the woods when that happens and no vehicle. As it was she wound up having to use her inhaler today, but I think it was just that we didn't take enough rest breaks.


When we got home I worked on the "tin can" lines for awhile. I am about a quarter done now. I have used up three 150 foot spoils of cord, so I guess I will need to go buy 9 more. They aren't expensive though. Running out of marbles, too.


If  I'm going to be walking around outside at night, it'll be nice to know no bruins or hogs are out there waiting for me around the corner.




Those two chickens my daughter brought down are getting to be enormous.  I'd hate to walk into one of those things by accident. They have turned mean.  One of them pecked the fire out of me the other day, poked a good sized hole in my shin. My fault, really, I know better than to let a rooster walk up on me like that.


This tree right by the porch is full of chickens at night.  As I've mentioned before, they are good "watch dogs". Anything unusual at night sets them off and they can raise a ruckus.

I was talking with a friend via blogs, and she mentioned that she likes to have a bagel with peanut butter every morning, but that peanut butter doesn't keep well. That made me wonder if they made a dehydrated peanut butter, and sure enough:



I found this on the Walmart on line order page.  I can't remember exactly what they wanted for it, but it wasn't much. I have margarine powder, pudding powder, drink powder, and powdered eggs but I don't think I have any peanut butter powder.



This month's American Survival Guide came.  It's got articles on making fires, dressing for the field, cheap knives, some book recommendations and an article about people who have survived wars and such in the past. I haven't really read it today, just thumbed through it.

I was surprised I hadn't done a post since Thursday, but we have been just taking it easy up here. I work outside a little bit during the morning, then we go for a walk, and we spend the rest of the day reading or seeing something on television. There's not much to tell right now, really.

Thought for the Day:




Some books: not the best but interesting.

I finished these over the weekend. They all came for our local library.  My wife is a voracious reader. She likes mysteries, and goes through a whole book bag in a few days.  I got these three while she was plundering around the library.



When I picked this up, it didn't have a cover. So  I didn't realize it was largely religious in nature. I was interested in reading about the British and Australian POW's who were forced to build the rail line for the Japanese through Burma and Thailand.  They were treated as badly as any prisoners of the  Japanese , and probably a good deal worse considering the death rate.  The first part of the book was interesting, as it detailed the authors attempt to escape the Japanese after the fall of Singapore. He almost made it to Ceylon in a native sailboat, but they got him. 

The second half is about how he and many others "found religion." in that hideous environment.  After the war, he became a preacher and spent the rest of his life doing that.  My father in law did exactly the same thing.  During the fighting on Okinawa, he promised God that if he lived, he'd devote himself to God's work. This he did, taking my mother in law, my wife and her siblings to some of the worst hell holes in Africa in the 1960's after he finished the seminary, just as soon as he could get the mission board to send him. My father in law was a hard case, there was nothing weak or "sky pilot" about him. He lived about two years after he retired, but Africa pretty much did for him.  Some people go that way with their lives, and other people ask themselves why , if God lets hideous things happen to good people, is there much reason to exalt him if he exists.  I'm not impugning anyone's religion or trying to stir up a religious debate. I'm simply saying that people who have traumatic experiences either go one way or the other. That's it.


I checked out this book expecting it to be pretty dry.  The author was a pink faced cherub, He went to school,  held a number of "make work" jobs like driving a bus, then he decided to become a historian.  He never served a day and never saw the elephant. Still, his approach was interesting, because he essentially was analyzing data obtained from questionnaires given to serving soldiers in the British and U.S. armies during World War II.

Some of the things he discusses are peculiar to that conflict, and I can't say one way or the other if he was right. But some of the issues he looked at are common to any conflict, and there I think he was pretty much on target. It was a bit of a struggle to get through, because there were some of the chapters on subjects I'm not particularly interested in.  Overall though, I thought he did a pretty good job where it mattered, and I finished the book.


Everybody who knows anything about World War II knows what happened to Germany, and to the Germans, when the Russians overran Eastern Germany.  I think most people believe, though, that the parts of Germany which were occupied by the Western Allies had it pretty soft.  This book gives the lie to that bit of fantasy. True, in most cases the Western allies did not indulge in orgies of rape and mass murder, as the Soviets did.  But some of our actions in Germany are hard to explain.  This book covers the period 1945 to 1950 in Germany.  It filled in a lot of gaps for me, and it was easy reading. I'd say I learned more from this in terms of post war Germany than any other books I've ever read. It made me think more highly of Winston Churchill (I already admired him greatly), and more highly of Harry Truman. It also made me even more convinced that a Democracy, however great a system it may be, is a breeding ground for scoundrels, charlatans, and mountebanks. Plato has first claim on that sentiment but I strongly second it. The actual airlift just provides a frame work for the political narrative, and while it's interesting it's treated in a peripheral fashion. The real story is the brutal Russian occupation and the efforts of the Western Allies, (some more than others) to resist it. 

I wouldn't buy any of these books, and I wouldn't say any of them are "fun" or "relaxing" reading. But you can learn a lot from them, each in their own way.

Levity:

(vulgarity)









44 comments:

  1. Peanut butter has a decent shelf life if I recall. Say a year which really means 2. Rotate it an that's a pretty decent shelf stable protein plan. If you are looking past 2 years of protein beans or meat on the hoof are the answers.

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    1. I'm not a real big peanut butter eater, but I have it around. I had some jars in the long term food storage, and they did kind of "separate out" with the oil on top, but I mixed it all back in and it tasted ok. I have a nagging suspension that a lot of the canned food and food in jars I keep for eons, then eat, tastes alright but isn't that nutritious. The lady I was "talking" about this with is good with gardens and she was thinking she could grow peanuts and make her own. If peanuts can grow there, I'm sure she could make peanut butter. She sent me some home made "hard tack" once and it was worlds better than the stuff I bought in cans. We have wild hogs here, if not like Texas then close.

      Did you ever watch that Australian guy , Albey Mangles, and his travel shows on TV. Maybe not, I haven't seen him in years. But he had these shows he made as he sailed his boat around, then he'd go show them in rural Australian towns. On one of his shows, he killed some wild pigs but when he butchered them they were full of worms. I am not sure if our hogs would be that way....

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    2. Albey Mangles, that brings back some memories, he always made sure he found a good looking chick who was always in her bikini to crew the boat with him!

      Sgt 73rd Regt

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    3. About 3 - 4 years ago, there was a rumor that peanut butter was going to go up in price and that it would be a good idea to buy a few more jars to beat the hike. I did so, but lost track of one until several months ago. Expiration date - Sept. 2014, if I remember correctly. It was still sealed and I took the sniff test. A bit stale, but not bad. Tasted it - again, slightly stale, but completely edible. I love that stuff on apple slices.

      So take that for what it is worth. Thanks for the post.

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    4. Good Morning Harry,

      I was wondering about that statement that peanut butter wouldn't keep as well. One of the 'experiments' we conducted with my roommates in college was to observe how long it took for some peanut butter someone spilt in an out of the way spot on the counter would 'last'. Pretty much all year, exposed on the counter, no bacterial growth and no fungal growth either. How is peanut oil rated as a long term storage item? I'm trying to recall which oil isn't supposed to go rancid but it's not coming to mind quickly. As far as pigs go, I've watched a lot of the hog hunting shows and read quite a few articles, worminess doesn't seem to be much of a concern. However, if I recall my Sophomore high school biology correctly, hook worm is a concern in all pork (domestic or wild) which is why you should 'cook it thoroughly' in any case. Up in my 'neck of the woods' we've had a couple of wild hog invasions and there has been a concerted effort to eradicate the populations. Last time I checked a couple of years ago Washington has been successful in their eradication efforts, not so much in Central Oregon.

      There's a hunting lodge in South Carolina that's on my list of things to do in the next couple of years that includes both 'trophy' hog hunting and whitetail deer. Looking forward to that stop on the journey.

      There's a book about a Southern freedom fighter who took on the Union Army all by his lonesome up in Tennesee (Jack Hinson's One Man War (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004IWRNDI/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 ) I found it a good read, and one of the reasons I found it so was the description of how his farm prepared for the winter. One of the activities described was the annual fall hog slaughter, if I recall correctly. His story is both sad and a lesson in conducting...ah, what do they call it these days.... oh, Asymetric Warfare.... Sad, because the Union Army, and I forget the particulars of why, severed the heads of I think his two eldest sons and stuck them on the gate fence posts to greet him on his return. Now he was a slave owner, but as part of that hog slaughter, they describe producing enough pork to get everyone through the winter with meat smoked good an proper. Anyway, if you haven't read it, I recommend it. I read the Kindle edition. As part of his planning for his insurgency actions, he had a custom long range muzzel loader built. Story claims accurate shots from 500 to 600 yards. If really true, that's some rifle and some shooting. He stopped the Union resupply boats chugging up the Tennesee River (hopefully that's the right river name) by picking off the officers on board the paddle wheelers as they tried to make their way up the river against the current.

      Thanks for sharing the picks of the waterfalls, I can see why they'd be a prime attraction.

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    5. Sgt, he sure did. I think the prettiest girl of all was the South African. And, she lived in a giant house and her parents were loaded. I could never figure out why he didn't marry her. But then, he didn't really seem very motivated by money. Showing his travel films in little towns for a small admission fee was never going to make him rich. Is he still alive, I wonder? Haven't heard anything about him in years, but I watched his shows on tv , never missed one.

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    6. Anon, that's good to know. Three or four years is a good shelf life. The only things I've run across that just doesn't store well at all are corn meal and powdered milk.Even stored in a cool, dry place in pails, with mylar bags flushed with nitrogen, those two just don't keep. The good news is, that even if the milk tastes nasty, I can mix it up and feed it to the outdoor cats and the dogs , they still like it. Same with the cornmeal, it may get too rancid for people, but you can still cook "pone" with it and the dogs will eat it greedily.

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    7. Tim, years back, my brother was going to come here and hunt hogs. The plan was to try to butcher what he killed and see if it looked edible. I know , long ago, people did kill and eat the hogs here, as one of the "gaps" or passes through the mountains is called "hog pen gap." There haven't been any attempts to kill all the hogs, as there have been in Texas and the states you mentioned. They mostly stay in the national forest. My problem with them is that I live on the edge of the national forest, and when we had a garden they would come in at night, eat what they wanted, and trample the rest.

      I had some peanut butter that seperated out, the oil formed up on top of it, but I can't remember how long that took to happen. I don't think I have much of it stored here, maybe three big jars, because my wife and I don't eat it much. In fact, we got it because we read somewhere that it's good for certain stomach and digestive maladies.

      My friend that likes peanut butter on her bagles in the morning has a large family (by today's standards) and probably goes through peanut butter pretty fast. She was wondering how long she could store it as a rule of thumb, and I just flat out don't know. Usually, I've got some experience with storing this or that, after more than 30 years it would surprising if I didnt. But I don't know about peanut butter. The general consensus seems to be that it will store and stay "sweet" indefinitely.

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  2. Always love your column, HF, and look forward to reading about your adventure of living off stocked supplies through the start of June. Despite living in town and working at a hospital, I *think* I could do the same, but would have to do some planning and shuffling to make it so. CC

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    1. So far, it's not a hardship. I ate our last guava today. They just started selling them in the grocery store in town before we started this, and I am addicted to them now. But no more til June.

      We're out of lettuce and green olives, and fresh bacon but I have canned bacon and canned black olives. I don't foresee any real difficulty, but if my calculations and spread sheets are right I shouldn't run out of anything vital even if I had to go a lot longer than a month.

      Have you ever seen that old History channel two hour show "After the Apocalypse." It's on the internet for free. It's about a person who works in a hospital and lives in town when a pandemic comes. They try to hold out for awhile in town, but with no water, no sewage and looting starting to be a problem they have to bug out. If you haven't seen it, it's good. The History Channel used to have some first class shows like that, now it's all "Scrotty McBooger the Raccoon man" and trash like that.

      Sometime when you have some vacation, might be worthwhile to try living off what you have for a week and see what happens. Most people who work at hospitals, unless you are in admin, are working really , really long hours, long shifts, day after day. If that's the case, you'll probably just want to sleep if you get any time off.

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  3. Evening Harry: I always thought that peanut butter kept pretty well. The peanut butter we pick up a Costco generally runs about two years out on the expiration date and I've eaten it as much as two years past that and it was fine. We keep a goodly amount around in the preps...about 24 pounds at the moment...we use enough of it that we can rotate through within the expiration dates no problem...comes in handy pilling the dogs and the cat likes it too.
    Caught a quick blurb on the radio about high pressure sitting off the coast of Florida and fires in Florida and Georgia...Is that looking to effect your neck of the woods?

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    1. Bob, I'm lacking in experience with long term storage of peanut butter, so I really couldn't answer my friends question on how long it last. But with your input, and some others, I'd say that at least 5 to 6 years if stored in a cool, dry place would be plausible. If it starts separating out into oil and the peanut butter, I know you can just mix it back together because I've done that. I probably ought to increase the number of jars I keep here, I'm sure it would come in handy over a long term disruption.

      Florida is having a lot of trouble with fires, and we have some burning in Southern Georgia now. Here in North Georgia, we've been spared that so far although there is a preemptive ban across outdoor burning in North Georgia at the moment that will last through the summer. Last summer was nightmarish, with lots of towns being damaged by fire, and people being caught by surprise in the woods at their rural homes and not making it out.

      Hopefully this summer will be better in that regard. It was arsonists that did the most damage, and they didn't catch many of them.

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  4. You live with scenery that some of us just dream about. I enjoy the pictures.

    I hope you will let us know the results of your month long test of supplies. It is a temptation for me to stock up on the things I really like before starting my own test in June. But I won't. If I did, it would be pointless to do the test in the first place. It takes willpower to keep from ordering several boxes of Little Debbie Nutty Bars. :)

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    1. Vicki, we just got ansey and we hadn't been to the falls in awhile. It was a nice change of pace.

      You're right, you can't go stock up on anything before you start. It would throw all your results off. You may run out of Nutty Bars, and I ran out of Guavas yesterday, but now we both know we might ought to lay in a few more of those items than we usually keep on hand. I don't think guavas will freeze, so I am probably out of luck there. I imagine you could put some Nutty Bars in the freezer though. We freeze bread, cheese and chocolate with no problem.

      Today's the 9th, and May has 31 days, so this will go on a bit. Tomorrow I have a doctors appointment, and we always have lunch at the buffet in that town when we go there, but not tomorrow. That would skew the results too. I think giving up going out for a meal is the hardest part of doing this, as it really doesn't impact us a whole lot otherwise.

      I don't expect you will run out of anything important either, as I've been reading your blog for a long time and you seem to me to have the routine down pat.

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  5. Honeyville has a lot of dehydrated foods at good prices, as well as baking supplies.

    http://food.honeyville.com/search?w=peanut%20butter

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    1. Gregg, thanks for the link and for passing the word. The more options we have, the more items we can locate and the more money we can save.

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  6. G'day Harry,

    Nice part of the mountains you live in that's for sure! Are there any trout in those pools? I always enjoy a bush walk along side a river or creek but you have to watch out for the leeches in summer here near the coast.

    I have a book written about the Aussie POW's in Japan and tells the story of what happened in between the final surrender and when allied troops finally reached them which took many weeks. What struck me was despite the unspeakable acts committed against them very few of the Aussies took revenge on the Japanese guards or civilians, mind you more than one of the worst guards was given a hiding by them when they took over the camps!, but that was about the worst of it. Will find the name for you as it is an interesting if sober read.

    Sgt 73rd Regt

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    1. Hey, Sgt. There used to be trout in them. But in the big 2007-2008 financial debacle here, the state went broke and one of the things they did was close the fish hatcheries. Because that spot is relatively isolated, some of those trout may have survived the hordes of summer fishermen from Atlanta. I don't think we have leeches here, but we sure have rattlesnakes and copperheads. I always keep on eye on the sides of the trail when I walking in brush.

      I noted that point, too. The guy who wrote the book I read said that at the end of the war, when the allied soldiers reached the camps, they were so infuriated at the state of the prisoners they wanted to kill the guards, but the prisoners stopped them. If it had been me, I'd have borrowed a shovel and beaten all the guards to death, one at a time.I am not one little bit into forgiveness. My motto is never forget, never forgive.

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  7. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)


    The latest on the 'Finned' Mosin. I ordered that screw today for $4.75. The shipping was $4.90. That was nuts (no pun intended) I guess one of those small brown, padded envelopes are really expensive?


    On Brieghtbart news out today there talk about how there are two North Korean satellites in orbit that pass right over the USA. There was some speculation that the are EMP nukes. There was also talk that the NK missile launches are all failing at 72 kilometers in altitude. That's the preferred altitude for an EMP:(
    Trump's handling the situation well I think. Trying diplomacy and everything else in order to avoid a war. We will see in time how this all plays out.

    Those two giant man attacking chickens your daughter left are edible right? That could help you out for the rest of the month. Name one lunch and the other dinner:)

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    1. Glad you got your part. If it cost you less than ten bucks and it's the right part, you did pretty well. Working on the old guns is expensive, because the only source of parts is other old guns being cannibalized.

      I think President Trump is doing a lot better than Clinton and the Kenyan. At least he isn't trying to pay them off like those two clowns did. I'm waiting with great interest to see what happens next.

      I hope the little Korean satellites are just for propaganda. The CIA (for what it's worth, which historically hasn't been much) says the North Koreans do not have miniaturized nukes they can fit in a warhead or a satellite yet. I think we are about to see if that' true.

      Yeah, they'd both be tasty, but I'm not apt to eat them unless things get tight. I hate cleaning chickens.

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  8. Who needs a beach when you have such a wonderful waterfall? The air must be wonderful there. We store whole grains and grind them into flour and cereal as we need it. If you can make bread and noodles, you are off to a good start. Add some sprouts for veggies and eggs and you can survive a long time. Do you have grey tree squirrels? Good eating, too. We had a rooster that attacked my DH when he happened to have the garbage can lid in his hands (where we store their grain) and he whopped that bird with it. Rooster was knocked flat...he staggered up, swayed and was a little addlepated after that, but he gave DH a wide berth, lol. Your rooster needs an attitude adjustment, too, it seems.

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    1. The waterfall is nice. North Georgia has a lot of them. There are some big ones, within 15 miles of my place, I've never been to. You have to hike back into the woods on a forest service trail to get to them and they are tourist attractions. Every year, some moron goes out on the edge of the falls, slips on the wet rocks, and plummets down to their deaths. This year so far it was a tv talking head from Atlanta who did that.

      We have lots of red wheat and flour stored, lots of bread mix and rolled oats. Corn meal doesn't keep so well, wish we had more of that, but I can make my own if I have corn, because we have a good mill.

      We do have squirrels here, but they don't live around my place as I have too many cats. But they are in the forest.

      I gave that rooster a good, swift kick after it pecked me. I had no idea the thing had such a powerful beak. I worry more about getting spurred, and these two don't have spurs like my other roosters do. I won't take them for granted again, though.

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    2. I wound up in the ER after our rooster attacked me one time.....he was sure good eating, though.

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    3. I don't think people who are not familiar with roosters realize how badly they can tear you up, especially if they get their spurs into you. I would never have let that "hay hay" get close enough to peck my bare leg if I hadn't taken him for granted. They'd never done that before. Wouldn't have been so bad if I hadn't been wearing walking shorts.

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  9. You might pick up a copy of Dan Hampton' s Lords of the Sky. He's a fighter pilot himself. All thing fighter pilot from before WWII to now I suppose as I haven't finished. He writes about the politics, tactics, planes and pilots of both sides.
    If interested and you don't want to buy it, give me a p.o. box and I'll mail it to you.

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    1. Ioren, that sounds like an interesting book, and I've never heard of the author. I appreciate your offer, but with the title and the authors name I can get a copy off Amazon cheaper than you could mail the book. It's nice of you to offer, though. I'll get it and I appreciate the heads up.

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  10. man, if i had them falls on my place i'd never leave.simply stunning. have no idea what draws me to them.

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    1. They're on the national forest land, but I live pretty close. I'm glad I don't actually own them, because if I did I probably couldn't pay the property tax.

      Water falls give you a kind of timeless feeling. Something about the constant flow of the water, I think. They're very relaxing and tranquil.

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  11. It's beautiful there! I'd love to have a waterfall that close.
    Great idea on the pb. I have seen small things of powdered pb in the stores - but they only last a year or so! I bet this brand is much more long term.

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    1. Lisa, there's a fellow named Joel , who writes a blog called "The Ultimate Answer to Kings". He is currently eating food out of number ten cans that's really old. Can't remember exactly how old he said, but OLD. He says the texture is a little degraded but the food is good and he hasn't gotten sick. I think just about anything in number ten cans, kept in cool dry place, will last pretty much forever. Well, not ANYTHING, since corn meal and powdered milk don't do too well. But I bet peanut butter powder would last a long time. The Other Ryan, who has been doing this for a long time, said he thought peanut butter would last years. His comment is on this post somewhere. I've been keeping up with him on line for many years now, and he has it together in a big way.

      yes, the waterfalls are nice. We go down there sometimes in winter, when it has been snowing, and it's like a whole other world. My wife says it is like being in Narnia and she keeps waiting for Mr. Tumnus to come walking out of the woods. She expects to find the lamp post at any minute somewhere by the falls. But I tell her Mr. Tumnus better not show up as I might riddle him , him being a faun and all.

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  12. Love the falls and I will admit to being envious that you are so close to them.

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    1. Hey, BW. The strange thing is, when I bought my place, I didn't even know the falls were there. Back then, there weren't any tourists and the local people didn't go out in the national forest much. There are seven sets of waterfalls within an hours drive, some of them much bigger and more impressive than these. But you have to hike way back in to get to most of them, and they have been "parkified" with DNR employees everywhere, and little gravel trails, and lots of people in Bermuda Shorts and Hawaiian Shirts and sandals throwing trash all over the place. And in the last ten years or so, those parking lots at the waterfall trail heads have had some bad things happen to people. So I just stick with ours close to home.

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  13. Hi Harry.

    You may find this book interesting. I enjoyed it more, being from FL, but I think it would be a good read regardless.

    https://www.amazon.com/Totch-Everglades-Loren-G-Brown/dp/0813012287

    Blind Ambition

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    1. What's it about , B.A.? I see Everglades in there, creepy place with all the pythons and such nowadays. I'll see if I can find it on Amazon. I appreciate the heads up.

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    2. Its a biography of a guy that lived down there before it was a national park. I think it starts somewhere between 1910 and 1920. Tells all about how things used to be. Many first hand stories.

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    3. Sounds good, I'll see about finding a copy. I once read a book about life here in this part of North Georgia in the 1920's. It was a whole different world then.

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  14. That spot with the falls looks lovely and secluded, very nice!

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    1. Jenn,

      It's nice, especially for a family. We used to load up the Jeep and go down there in the summer a lot, so my kids and my dogs could swim. I'd sit there on a rock and keep an eye on things, and my wife would bring a little camp chair and read. It's cool there, even in summer. We always took a picnic lunch, with some hog jowls for the dogs and sandwiches for us. Now, with the kids grown up and gone, I don't go as often. It was nothing to hike down there from the house when I was 34, but at 64, I don't do it as often.

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  15. I gotta hand it to the "greatest generation" (your father-in law) that if they made commitments they largely followed through with things. Almost unheard of today.

    That river is just the kind of place that I would want to fish in. Very serene. --Troy

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    1. That's true. Things have sure changed since I was a kid. I'm trying to think of something that has changed for the better, but the only thing that comes to mind is cliches from the government and the media, and those are just propaganda. In just about every respect, things have deteriorated.

      It's a nice quiet place. It's peaceful too, since it's hard to get to and people who try in passenger cars usually don't make it. They either can't ford the two creeks, or they knock their car to pieces on the big rocks sticking up out of the road because they have no ground clearance.

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  16. Ah, Alby Mangels! I loved his stuff! I need to poke around on YouTube and see if they have any of his videos. I'll also have to check out that History Channel "Apocalypse" show. CC

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    1. Yeah, CC. I think we would have liked Alby Mangels if we met him, he seemed like a good guy and I really admired the life he led. I wouldn't have the courage to go sailing all over the world, in a little boat. Not even if I always had beautiful women along like he did.

      It's a good flick. Back when the History Channel was new, they did well researched, well funded documentaries with guest speakers who had the credentials and the experience to add something to the show. Now the History Channel is just embarrassing.

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  17. That's so cool that you live so close to waterfalls. They are so pretty!

    The closest one to us is 5 hours away in Valentine, Nebraska. It's pretty far.

    You mentioned on my blog that you don't really care for sports. I don't either. I just wanted to go to the baseball game because it was warm, it had the these of Star Wars, firecrackers, and Star Wars Lego sets were being given away.

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    1. It's nice having them so close. Especially since they are fairly secluded so we have them pretty much to ourselves.

      I think parents have to do a lot of things they don't really have a basic interest in, for their kids sake. I'm not very interested in zoo's or aquariums but we traveled all over to those kind of things when my kids were your kid's ages.

      It's always a plus when you can get good stuff free! I may not like sports but I like bargains like that. ;-)

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