“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

The Days don't get better than this.



Got up this morning, and it was a perfect dawn.  A cool breeze blowing through the trees, low humidity, and all the birds singing.  As the sun comes up, the forest denizens start to wake up. Lots of squirrels leaping around from tree to tree, and all kinds of birds. Some, like Blue Jays and Wood Peckers, I recognize. Some I don't. There's one odd little blue bird, very tiny, that walks up and down the pine trees, looking for bugs I suppose. Only pine trees, never see it on the poplar , maple or oak.




I often walk down the mountain to the creek just a few hundred yards away and let the dogs roust about and swim. This morning my wife decided to come, so we went down the jeep trail, to the old forest service road. I was a little concerned about the trip back, because she has some respiratory problems, but we stopped frequently.  Our party consisted of ourselves, two dogs, three cats, and a ferret riding along in a back pack with a mesh window for him to look out of.




Ferrets are really admirable animals. Even when they get older, and start having medical problems, they are good companions.  They're jovial and love to go outside, even if they have to ride in the back pack because they can't make the trip on their leash anymore.  My ferrets all come from rescues, or adds in the paper where people don't want them anymore, or they have been abandoned and the animal shelter calls because they don't take ferrets. I've really appreciated them all, but the one I was closest to was Ragnar.  He passed away three years ago this month, after a long struggle with cancer. Still miss him, he was a great spirit.



When I used to go to the water fall with the dogs, I usually wore a .45 in a shoulder holster. It isn't that far, but you go through some pretty dense forest to get there. These days I drive down in the truck if I want to go, the walk is a bit much.  I take one of the Navy Arms Enfield No. 7 replicas with me, because when I leave the truck and go down the path to the water fall, I don't want to get yaffled up by a bear, or hogs, or whatever might dispute the path with me.


This is replica of an Australian rifle that never went past the prototype stage, as the war ended. But it's a shooter.







Someone new to read: Edward Abbey


I've mentioned in a couple of comments that I found a new author I really like.  His name was Edward Abbey.  Some time back I was sitting in a shop while my wife plundered around. I picked up a book by this fellow, started browsing through it, and wound up buying it.

Abbey was born in the Appalachian Mountains around 1922.  Until he was 17, he stayed there. Then he thumbed his way across the country in 1942, just before going into the Army, and he never looked back. Although he lived in Europe, visited Australia, and made his living writing about his travels, his first love was the SouthWest. He spent most of his life there. He died in the early 1980's after a botched operation on his throat. In accordance with his wishes, his friends took his body into the desert and buried it in a place that remains secret to this day.



By coincidence, he and I both went to the University of New Mexico, he was there in the forties and early fifties (he was an on again, off again student for 10 years.)  He wrote about some of his travels in New Mexico and they really rang a bell with me.  I've managed to get three of his books, and just ordered 7 more. They are all used, as he has largely been forgotten and as far as I can tell, no one is publishing his books today.




He did four kinds of books.  The one's I am reading are his factual accounts of his own life. He wrote fiction, he collaborated on photo books of the Southwest, and he has books that are collections of his essays and magazine articles, largely published after his death.

If you are the kind of person who likes solitude, who values the wilderness, then his books are for you. Lots of them are available on Kindle and you can use Amazon to find used copies for very little money.

Try his book "Desert Solitaire" first. It's a book that you can connect with.




Thought for Today:




And some music for the evening time:




54 comments:

  1. Oh, how beautiful, Harry. Spring is my favorite time of year and your area is lovely. Reminds me of where I grew up. I will check out these books. Occasionally there are ferrets at the Petco. I never even thought about them until I started reading your blog.

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    1. These mountains are beautiful, in every season. I have never been able to decide which is my favorite. I don't know why I am constantly yearning after deserts and beaches.

      I wish ferrets weren't sold to the general public. They require a huge amount of attention and care to be happy and healthy. People don't know that they invariably have big medical bills. But if you know all those things and accept them at the beginning, there's no better animal friend to go through life with.

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  2. Cute - the description of who went on the morning walk 😀
    Cool, early mornings are my favourite time too, especially if there is some low lying inversion fog in the valleys with clear skies above Quiet, peaceful and calm - the perfect way to start the day...
    Doesn't happen often, so I treasure it when it does.

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    1. When the sun comes up, I'm at my most energetic, so that's when I try to get my walking in. My wife an I often go to town to run errands, and then go for a walk in the park. I have learned to do all the errands first, because otherwise I am worn out after the walk and we wind up skipping things. As it is, I sit in the car at Walmart and listen to the radio. The floors in there are cement and they just suck the energy right out of you. Sounds like you have a nice place to walk. I remember when I first read your blog you mentioned some kind of hideous snake, maybe it was a Cobra. I'd walk with both eyes on the ground there I think.

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  3. My daughter had a ferret when she went to college, and we got to ferret-sit occasionally. He was SO MUCH FUN! Really a rascal, and quite clever.

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    1. Chipmunk, they are like little people. I have never known any animal to be so full of the joy of life. And they are so grateful for any little thing you do for them. They have all the positive aspects of a human being and none of the negative ones. They really are intelligent, and very loyal.

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  4. Replies
    1. Yeah. You're in a good location too. I liked your photo of the bear.

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    2. Thanks for putting me on your blogroll. I just noticed that yesterday. I have been around bears before so I do know to take precautions. I have been reading some of your posts. Quite the blog!

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    3. Nice of you to say so. I use the blog roll to keep track of blogs I like, it's set up to move blogs to the top of the list that have new (recent) posts. I came across your blog from Vicki's blog roll, I think, and was intrigued. You got my attention with your bear photo!

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  5. If ferrets are that delicate, how do they survive in the wild? Is it living in captivity that is so hard on them?

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    1. The ferrets like I have can't survive in the wild at all. They can go about three days before they starve to death. Last year in Chicago, somebody dumped two ferrets off in a big park. A non-ferret person saw them, so didn't pick them up. But she did call the big Ferret Rescue there. They mobilized 400 people to search the park, and on the 2nd day, a kid walking around with a squeaky toy by some bushes found them. They were in bad shape. It seems they were both ill when they were abandoned. But the ferret rescue was able to treat them, get them well, and found them new "forever" homes.

      Once one of mine slipped out of the door and got away. I spent hours walking around the house and the woods near the house, when it got dark I used the flood light. Finally, I saw dirt shooting out from under a dead log, and then two shiny eyeballs. I snatched that guy up, and he was red from head to foot with the Georgia clay. I have rarely been so relieved in my life, it was like a huge weight left me, because I knew he wouldn't survive the night out there, the owls or coyotes would have gotten him.

      There actually is a species of wild ferrets that live in Montana and that area. They don't look like domestic ferrets. They are called Black footed ferrets. They nearly went extinct, but researchers have restored a small population and the hope is they will increase in number and not vanish.

      What's really hard on ferrets is an assinine law that the federal government issued as a diktat. Because there is a one in a million chance that someone might let a domestic ferret go around the Black Foot ferret population, the law says that all ferrets have to be spayed or neutered before they can be sold. Since the breeders, like Marshal's , want to get them into the pet stores, the males are neutered too soon. As a result , about 25% of them die of adrenal disease before they are five. It's a very bad way to go. I had two of mine implanted with chips that dripped medicine into their system as a way to slow it down. The bill was $400.00 for the two animals. One died immediately of blood poisoning from the operation. The other died a month later. But it's like anything else, when someone is sick and you think there's a chance, you try it.

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  6. Nice photos. Glad your weather has improved. We are still dealing with cold and rain.

    The name Edward Abbey rang a bell but I could not place him. Then I checked Amazon where many of his books are still available, at least in Kindle edition. That's where I found out where I head his name. His book, The Monkey Wrench Gang, was pretty well known back in the day.

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    1. Tht's the guy! I got the feeling that he was well known in the 70's and 80's, and maybe before. I read an excerpt from the Monkey Wrench Gang, and also from Hayduke Lives. I wanted to get his non fiction books first, because they are so fascinating, so I ordered seven and ran myself out of book money, unless I plunder from another part of the budget. But now May is here and I am replenished. I'd like to get all his books, but he sure did write a lot of them!

      I should have something new to read for a long while now.

      I got all the books I have on order through Amazon. I don't like them, but I'll deal with them to get something I want, and they do have some of his work on Kindle. They also list lots of obscure little book sellers that have one copy of this, or one copy of that. I can be a pragmatist when I need to be. ;-)

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  7. What a grand day. Hope you and the Mrs. have many more before summer sets in. I love the way you have found to include the ferret in your walks. I wouldn't have thought of it myself.

    I will have to look for those books. As one who enjoys solitude, I believe I will enjoy reading them.

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    1. Vicki, M doesn't usually walk with me around the property because coming back up the mountain on the Jeep trail is really tough. For both of us. But today I just didn't want to get in the vehicle and drive to the park, and she felt ancey so she came along.

      When my ferrets get old or infirm, I go to great lengths to get them outside for some air and sun, even if all they can do is lay on a towel and just soak it up. They are curious creatures and love to walk on their tiny leashes in the meadow. When they can no longer do that, I carry them in a red backpack that has a mess window in it next to a pocket. They can lay in the pocket, be comfortable, get air, and see everything going by.

      I think you will like the books. Don't know if you have ever been out west, but I love the SouthWest and his writing really resonated with me.

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    1. I think so. Both you and I have a number of traits that Abbey had in profusion. If you get a chance to read his books, you'll see immediately what I mean.

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  9. Even before you said that Desert Solitude was the one to read first, that was the one that most appealed to me. I haven't read any books by him.

    You had quite a parade of animals on your walk! It was a gorgeous day here as well.

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    1. His philosophy of life was admirable, and his writing is excellent. You can almost see the landscape as he describes it. I hadn't even heard of him til I found that one book. He isn't published anymore, and he's really from a completely different time. But he's still relative to today, maybe even more so than he was when he was alive.

      I wish the cats would just stay home. They straggle behind, wander off the trail into the forest and sit there squalling until you come get them. Sometimes they won't walk anymore and just lay down in the trail and have to be carried. But they enjoy the walk just like the rest of us.

      Today was spectacular. Glad it was nice at your place as well. Rain coming in on Thursday, supposedly a lot of it, but we are still in drought conditions here so I am glad of it.

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  10. I recommend Abby's Book "The Monkey Wrench Gang" & the follow-up book "Hayduke Lives". Both are classic great reads.
    SB

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    1. SB, I plan to get "The Monkey Wrench Gang" and "Hayduke Lives" as soon as I have collected his non-fiction, and his photo collaborations. I wish I could just swoop out and buy them all but my book allocation in the budget is meager at best. I'll get them all eventually though, and those two I will certainly read. I read little extracts from both in one of his other books and I'm sure I'll like them. Also "The Brave Cowboy" looks good.

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  11. I highly recommend Abby's book "The Monkey Wrench Gang" & the follow-up "Hayduke Lives".

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    1. My blog must be giving people trouble with commenting again. But I'm so impressed that you know of Abbey and those two books I am glad I get the chance to say so again! ;-)

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  12. are the falls/creek on your land? if it was on mine i'd have a chair and a cooler there 24/7. nothing so soothes the soul as a creek running.

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    1. The creek cuts through here. The water fall is not far away, but it's on national forest land. I can sit on my porch at night and hear the creek rushing, it's a soothing sound. Even now, with the drought, it's still running strong.

      It does add to the tranquil nature of my front porch in the evenings or late at night.

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  13. Harry-such a descriptive post. I love the pics and could just imagine you and your little menagerie trooping down the mountain. What a wonderful day to enjoy all the beautiful nature. Jana

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    1. Jana, sometimes I have ten or more cats trailing along, the dogs always come, and I take the ferret if it's not too hot or cold. My wife is an unusual addition to the gang, as she has a hard time making it back up the mountain . So do I , for that matter. But today I just didn't want to get in the car and drive to one of the parks to walk, and she was tired of her elliptical workout, so she came along.

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  14. Well, three of the seasons are nice, anyway. You can have winter.
    That's a nice Enfield. Enfields in general are rugged and fun to shoot, even though everyone knows the only rifle a real man would carry is an AR or an AK. (I don't own either one, but I do have an Enfield.)
    The No. 5 Jungle Carbine was famous for its wandering zero. Did the No. 7 fix the problem?

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    1. Winter is tough here, but it's nice to see everything covered in the snow, especially when I don't have to go anywhere and can go back inside by the fire.

      I love the Enfield rifles. I have several Lithgow no.1 MK.III rifles that were unissued, they are my pride and joy.

      The Jungle no.7 is a replica, so of course it has no collector value, but it does chamber 7.62X51, and it's light. I have reached that stage in life where I try not to carry more weight than I have to when I am out kaboodling around

      I don't know the answer to that, as the Australians only produced a few prototypes of the gun before the War ended. I have heard that the wandering zero problem on the Jungle Carbine was caused by the lightening cuts on the receiver, and there were none on the Number 7 so maybe they did. It's a good question.

      Glad to see you again.

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  15. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    I gotta check into some of those books.

    It was the perfect tropical day down here. Cool breeze coming off the water from the south, southeast. 85 degree's with clear tropical flow and sky.

    The weather down here varies frequently. It can be hot and dry with a west wind coming off the Sierra Madre mountains. Cold and blustery with a North Wind from a cold front. The tropical flow comes off the east, southeast or the dominate south winds. Now if there's a cold front somewhere's up north. The wind can blow 45 miles an hour for days at a time with no let up. Salt blow's off the water and gets on everything. Then a strong cold front causes the wind to change course out of the north in an instant, 45 miles an hour or more. Sometimes as much as 70 miles an hour. The coastal area I live in has been deemed 'windier than Chicago' and the most 'corrosive coastline' in America for all the salt in the air.
    There are not too many sailboats down here because it its just too windy and 'small craft adviserie's are a daily occurance. Now there are lots of motorized fishing vessels of all types. Mostly small fishing boats and flat bottom boats for shallow waters on bays such as the Copano Bay and others.

    Now for the humidity. I am adapted to the humidity but it even can get to me sometimes. In the height of the tropical humidity. It can be over 100 degree's with 98 percent humidity. Refrigerated air conditioning is must down here. The early to mid-mornings are tolerable. The afternoons are horrendous with the sun beating down in the late summer afternoon. Even driving a new car in the worst of the afternoon heat is drain and only short drives are recommended.
    One thing I can say. If on the beach or very close to the water. Get in shade, good shade from under a bridge or something. There is almost always a breeze coming off the water and the temperature is down in the 70's (in the shade) and it is very, very tolerable and as long as your in the shade. You can stay there all afternoon with the breeze off the water.

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    1. You know I am always envious of you, living right down there at the beach. Morning and sunset at the beach can't be beat, not even by the mountains.

      Humidity destroys me. The worst I ever ran into was Okinawa. I got off the plane at Kadena Air Force Base, they opened the hatch, and it was like the breath of hell out there. I never did get used to it.

      I couldn't live here in Summer without air conditioning and dehumidifiers. The temps get up over 100, and the humidity will be so high that water drips down the sides of your vehicles parked under trees. You can imagine what that would do to books, clothing, equipment, weapons, stored food... That's why even my barn has an environmentally controlled section.

      I remember the wind on Padre Island from the summer I spent down there at Kingsville and Beesville, and Corpus Christi Naval Air Station. Don't know what it's like now, 44 years later, but from what you tell me it's still a wonderful place.

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    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      I think I would have liked Okinawa. I really like sub-tropical heat. Now the way you describe your area in the worst part of the summer is interesting. How did the old timers keep everything from rusting or rotting a hundred years ago in those mountains?

      I envy the solitude and seclusion where you live by the way.

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    3. Okinawa had it's points. It had beautiful beaches. It's a favorite spot with Japanese newlyweds for their honeymoon. They have luxurious hotels on Green beach, one of the major landing sites from the war. In Naha city they have pachinco parlors. It's like going into a casino, except you pay to have a little ball start falling at the top of a big board, and it has hundreds of possible paths. You get money if your little ball makes it down to the bottom. I never understood all the nuances, but there would be hundreds of Okinawans in the pachincho parlors at night, with lights flashing and bells going off. It was fun.

      Also, from Kadena Air Force Base, you could catch a MAC hop to anywhere in the Pacific they went for ten bucks. I should have gone to Australia but I always weakened at the last moment and took the hops to Manila and Subic Bay.

      Yeah, it is secluded here. I'd last about one day with the people you have to deal with and then I'd go postal. I guess if I lived down there I'd pitch a tent way off on the beach somewhere, or get a little camper/truck combination.

      I suspect mildew and the like were a problem here, but lacking any remedy people just put up with it. A hundred years from now, people will look back and ask the same question about us.

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  16. Where I grew up, we could not leave anything out overnight. Leather would mold, metal would rust, coat hangers left their rusty outlines on clothes indoors. We did not know any better. Where I live now, there is almost no humidity. The nights are cold and quiet in the summer....no insects or frogs or any noise, just silence. Sometimes a coyote. Summer temps get into the 80's is all. People here wear shorts at 50 degrees....brrrrr. It is too cool to sit outside in the evenings in summer. Every place has pros and cons; some more than others.

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    1. The last time I went to California, I had forgotten how dry the air was out there. The temps were high, but it felt almost comfortable in that low humidity environment. When I was out your way, the only negative environment thing I ran into was clouds of huge mosquitoes down by the Snake River. I'd never seen anything like it, they came out of the reeds along the river in absolute swarms. As you say, there's always a thorn among the rose petals.

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  17. Harry ..... hard to believe Ragnar has been gone 3 years already. I remember your posts about him and remember that was kinda tough on you when he died.

    I think I would like to see that little parade you put on with your pack of animals. The fact that they all follow you like that says alot about you

    I'll check out these books!

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    1. Hey, Matt. Good to hear from you. Yes, it's been three years since Ragnar died. That was a tough situation. I still regret I didn't stay in the room with him at the end, I had to go out in the parking lot. But he was semi-conscious at that point, he was so bad off. Maybe he didn't know I left him in there. I miss the little guy.

      I try to sneak away to walk down the mountain to the mailbox sometimes. I can elude the dogs if they are sleeping on the porch, but there is no getting away from the cats. Sometimes I walk down the mountain with a long retinue of cats trailing along behind.

      I think you will like Edward Abbey. I sure do.

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    2. Our many cats always liked to walk with us at their own sweet pace. Now we only have one cat and he is DH helper and is his shadow. The vision of you and your trail of critters brought a smile. Cats like to meander, don't they? Brings meaning to the phrase "herding cats".

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    3. It's more a death march than a herd. As we go along, the cats get tired. They stop and lay down, and squall until we pick them up, or take a rest. The cats are all up and down the side of the path or dirt road, climbing trees, looking under logs. The dogs and I just trudge along. On the way back, when we get to my gate, we stop so the dogs can lay down in the stream next to it, and cool off and have a drink. This is the one that bubbles up on my land, and there isn't much water in it now, because of the drought. I told M today I need to go down there with a shovel and at least dig out the sand so there is a little pool for the dogs to cool off in.

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  18. Ed Abbey was an icon of the Left, as long as he stuck to environmental issues. As soon as he went off the plantation by stating he was sick of all the illegals dumping trash in his beloved desert, the watermelons went all berserk on him. I remember his comment, "they should give every one of the wetbacks a rifle and 50 rounds and send them south again". He was quite a guy. Loved guns. Loved beer. Great writer.

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    1. One of the reasons I liked the first book I bought, and got so interested in him, was that all these years later, it seems to me he was right on target in his view of things. He was the kind of person you like to hang out with. I was really impressed with how well he could convey a scene with words. He had the perfect knack for it. The fact that he was writing about the desert, which I always liked, made it that much more interesting.

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  19. How come you get really cool replicas of Aussie prototype rifles that are non existent down here in their country of origin!

    The blokes in my club have a saying if you turn up with a rifle that they really like, "I'm putting a tag on that" which means that when you die your wife will know who to give the rifle to by the name on the tag!

    Cheers
    Sgt 73rd Regt.

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    1. A long time ago, there was a company that was really two companies. They were both owned by a guy named Val Forgett. One was "Gibbs Rifle Company" which sold surplus guns. The other was "Navy Arms" which mainly sold replica old west and civil war guns, primarily from Italian companies like Pedersoli.

      I bought surplus guns from them because they sold good quality weapons, never exaggerated their grading system, and they got things nobody else got. I once bought two Ishapore Enfields from them. I ordered "unissued" but got "very good." I knew it was just a packing error, so I wrote to Val Forgett and explained what happened. Even before I returned the first two guns, I got two new one delivered and they were immaculate. They were perfect. There was also a personal note from Val Forgett apologizing for the error. They were a top flight company.

      One of the things they did was build replica guns. Since the Ishaphore Enfield was an Enfield MK.III with just a few changes and chambered in 7.62X51, they cut some of them down and made replicas of the Australian Enfield no.7 prototype. It's a sweet gun, light, short, packs a big wallop, and the magazine holds 12 rounds. I bought two of those. They don't have any collector value, of course, but it's a "fun gun."

      That's a good system, over the years I've made similar arrangements with a number of fellows. Once you are gone, you might as well be sure your weapons get a good home, and don't go to someone who will have them cut up and made into sporters.

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  20. Good Morning Harry, very nice description of you journey to the waters with your 'family'. I purchased the Kindle editions of Abbey's books and started in on Desert Solitaire. Even the Author's introduction was entertaining and well written. I believe I've heard of the 'Monkey Wrench Gang' as well. I'm looking forward to checking that one out too.

    My wife and I went through Arches a couple of years ago. My brother went to UNM back in the late 60's (probably 67-69), didn't study hard enough so was politely asked to take a Sabbatical . Ended up returning to school at the U. of Albuquerque as a member of the Air Force ROTC and finished his degree, met his wife who was a native of ABQ and they plan to return there for their retirement. He'd been requesting that I join him for the ballon festival for like 'forever' so we were pleased to finally get to go down there for that and my wife had been wanting to see Arches since her family used to travel past the place on their way back to see her grandparents. It is a beautiful park, took us 30+ minutes to work our way up to the front of the line to get in, the line of cars et. al was so long and then there was the first half mine of incline which had us wondering about cliffs along the way, my wife is disenchanted with sitting next to such steep inclines. :-), but once we got past that first 0.5 miles and were up on top it was a joy. They have one campground that we just have to get back to and there was a pullout that we spent lunchtime at in our small RV. I swear, out every window was a picture perfect view of one rock formation or another. Wish I could have captured those views better on camera.

    I envy your being able to sit on your porch and listen to the creek. I tease my wife sometimes as we sit on our deck and listen to our stream....of traffic. We're on the corner of one of the busier cross streets. You have bears and coyotes, we have busses and neighbors with Harley's .... lots of 'fun' specially when those nocturnal Harley's wake up for their graveyard shift. . On the plus side, I don't need an alarm clock, nor any clock, thank you very much, I can tell you what time it is just by listening for a few seconds to the 'flow'....

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    1. Tim, I have been to some of the places Abbey talked about, but not to the Arches. I have been through Utah but just passing through. It sounds like his predictions came true, I doubt he would recognize the place you described. Another fellow left a comment and said The Monkey Wrench Gang was his best book. I read an extract from it in the first book I got, which was a collection of his writings from different publications.

      When I came up into the mountains, I was pretty beaten up mentally. I needed to get away from the hustle and bustle. I had visions of working in a saw mill or a feed store, something like that. But I wound up going back to school and being an accountant, which was a good decision financially and a terrible decision on every other count. But now I am retired, and I have all this. I feel like it was worth it in the long run. I think back to how hard it was working in the oil and gas industry, and I think "if not for that, I wouldn't have this." I guess it all evens out over time.

      My biggest fear , seriously, is that if we go to live in a condominium in Florida, I will start getting "compression stressed" again and wind up murdering some Jewish person from New York down by the condo pool. Whenever we go down there for a week or so, I always get roped into a discussion with some ultra left wing Jewish person from New York. The only reason I haven't done murder yet is I always tell myself, "remember the Israelis you know." The difference is night and day.

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  21. Solitude is a great stress relief, and so is the sound of a creek. My wife and I believe that one day soon we'll have a place of our own with water and space out West here with places of solitude. In the mean time we'll take advantage of the vast public lands to find those places. I credit my wife with keeping me on the 'straight and narrow' as far as doing any kind of bodily harm to anyone. Other than in a self defense incident where she wouldn't have any qualms if I reacted, the only person I've contemplated providing an attitudinal adjustment to is the S.O.B. who abused my children, but out of deference to my wife, who thinks it would harm my soul as well, I've put those thoughts aside.

    I've not met any obnoxious Easterner's, most of our obnoxious folks are California transplants. I did know an Israeli weed scientist many years ago when I was in graduate school. He was a great guy. He'd fought in the Six Day War and included fascinating slides on it as part of his talk on desert agriculture and week control. That was in the mid-70's.

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    1. Someone told me once that scientists had done an experiment with rats. They put them into a space too small for the number of rats, and they went crazy. They ate each other and other bizarre behavior, not consistent with their normal behavior.

      If people didn't have to live in such crowded cities, I think there would be a lot less bad behavior, regardless of ethnicity.

      I hope you do get that place. I know several people who are in the process of moving out of negative environments, and into Idaho, Colorado, etc. It can be done. And I think you will not regret making the change.

      I can understand what you mean. I thought about killing my boss several times, but I also realized the police would figure out who did it pretty quickly, and he wasn't worth it.

      The people here who really grate on my nerves are from places like New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and the City of New York. I know there are good people from all those places, but the ones I have run into or read "letters to the editor" from in our paper are real flamers.

      Wives tend to be moderating factors in men's behavior. I could be wrong but I think they don't get angry as fast as men do, and don't automatically want to do physical harm to someone who deserves it.

      Israelis I have worked with tended to be a bit brusque, and a lot arrogant, but I always figured you aren't arrogant if you deliver. And they do. Also, and I grant you most of the Israelis I have known were military, they don't tend to be weak kneed, whiny, head in the clouds morons with no grounding in the real world. On the other hand, some of the Jewish people I have run into in Florida, were exactly that and I can't tolerate it.

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  22. Harry,

    Spring in your neck of the woods is just gorgeous. I love going on those walks through the woods on trails just to see what's new. We go often with the dog and always armed because like you said in the past, "you just never know what you'll run into".

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    1. Some years back, in one of the Southern states , but I can't remember which one, and elderly couple went for a walk in the woods near their house. They were attacked by feral dogs and both of them were killed. A couple of years ago, a young Canadian girl who was pretty well known up there as a folk singer was attacked by coyotes on a park trail and they killed her. I've never heard of coyotes killing anyone, but they say that's what happened.

      So, when I leave the cleared area around the buildings, I always assume that I might run into something unpleasant, two legged or four legged. And the truth is, I got my concealed carry permit almost as soon as I came back to Georgia, so I have been carrying for three decades plus, and it's second nature to me. I don't carry heavy pistols so much a I used to, preferring lighter semi-autos these days. The weight gets burdensome, especially when it's hot.

      I think my wife and I need to get out and get away from the place, ever so often, and since we are literally surrounded by nice places to walk in the woods, or we can go to the parks or the lakes, it's not hard to get motivated to go. It's good quality time for husband and wife, important when you have different interests most of the time.

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  23. beautiful forest pictures. I love sitting out on our porch and staring into the woods here. Everything is so green right now and very peaceful. Weather here has been awesome. Nice breezes, moderate temps. I heard a cold front is moving through tonight and going to be in the low 40s here on Saturday. I will take it for as long as we can before the real heat of of summer sets in. -JUGM

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    1. Hey, Glock Mom. I was just watching the news (2045 local on Thursday night) and the weather said there were tornadoes in South Carolina. We have had rain, on and off, all day and I see a big storm is just west of us, passing over Chattanooga, so we'll be getting it soon. Hope none of the bad stuff comes near your place.

      It IS peaceful to sit out on the porch at night way out there in the boonies. No motor noises, no people noises, just the wind in the trees and the creek splashing over the rocks. I made a big pot of coffee tonight and sat out there a while, it was cool and windy. Pretty nice.

      Good to hear from you.

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  24. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Rifle Alert!

    I traded that Kymber 1911 for a 1891 Mosin Nagant 'Dragoon' (made in 1900) that has the Tsarist double headed eagle cartouches. Its all original with the 28 inch barrel etc. It was a Finnish Capture with the 'SA' in the box cartouche and the Finn's added a raindeer skin sling with swivel's for sling. Here's the video of the same rifle I have from Hickok 45 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyOwdgtJd78
    My rifle is from the same batch as that one in the video.
    When that video first came out. I checked the price of the Mosin in the video. I think the price was $900 at Bud's Gun Shop two years ago. Again, I am not sure of the price.
    The rifle I have was made by Tula and bolt and receiver serial numbers match. The Dragoons as I understand it did not have etchings of Russian Serial numbers all over it. The best part of the rifle is it is not bastardized with the Soviet hammer and sycle and the Double Headed Eagles are not stamped out by the Soviets.
    This rifle is pretty close to original condition except for the Finnish rain deer sling and swivels in the stock and forearm which was a modification made to a great many of these rifles.
    Again the rifle in the video is a 'clone' to the rifle in the Hickok 45 video.
    I think I actually traded up on this one. These Mosins are going up in value were as the Kymber pistol prices remain flat.
    One last item of note. The long stock (which is in excellent condition) no cracks or repairs and the 28 inch barrel make the rifle stand about 5 ft, 5 inches tall. No Bayonet. I don't think the Finn's were keen on keeping Baynet's.

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    1. CC, a Kimber pistol is a very high quality piece of equipment. Very valuable. On the other hand, an unmodified Mosin Nagant Dragood is very rare. I believe I would have traded too.

      I have a model 1891 Mosin Nagant, all correct and original, but it is not a Dragoon. In truth, I have never actually seen an original condition Dragoon.

      That is the rifle the Cossack contingent of the Russian Expeditionary Force was armed with during the relief of Peking during the Boxer Rebellion. It's a sweet piece, no lie.

      Let me look at the video, I want to see that, sure enough.

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