Sunday, September 10, 2017

The storm gets here tomorrow evening.




This will be a short post, because I am worn slap out. M and I both worked hard  today, doing last minute "beefing up" of our place. I managed to cut my leg pretty good on the sheet metal of the porch roof, and then smashed my thumb putting down some extra roofing nails on the sheet metal. I never claimed to be a "handy man" and today's events accentuate that fact. Still, we have done all we can do.

I hope everybody  realizes that when they say they do something one way, and I say I do it a little different, I am not laying any claim to superior knowledge. People have different preferences is all it means. Another persons way works for them, and mine works for me. That's pretty typical of anything.

Big worries for tomorrow night are heavy rain and heavy winds. Too much rain means the water could overflow my up slope diversion ditches and get up against the buildings. That's a very bad thing.

Too much wind means these cursed pine beetles will utterly annihilate the phone and power lines, and they'll block all the roads.

Unless a big oak or poplar comes down on the house in the middle of the night and kills us, we will survive. The question is, how much damage will we take. Having worked like a dog for the last two days to beef up our defenses, I don't want to spend the next two weeks without power, unable to travel, and doing repair work.

But it's out of my hands now. There comes a time when you have done all you can do, and you just have to see what happens. That's where we are now.



Remember this one?

25 comments:

  1. I'm sure we're all rooting for you, Harry, and that you're getting a few prayers in the process.

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    1. Never hurts. I've done all I can do , so now it's just wait and see. So far, the scanners are showing a lot of activity on the county road crew's part, mostly trees down. Not a lot on the sheriff's net or the fire/rescue net.

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  2. Be safe, and good luck to you, and here's to hoping the storm passes you by and leaves you unharmed and all your property intact.

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    1. I'll go along with that. I planned to take the Jeep down to the church on the hard surface road and leave it this morning, but the storm got here early, in the middle of the night, so I guess I'll just hope nothing falls on the parking pad. Supposed to be completely over by tomorrow, so we just need to get through tonight and then see what has to be done. Thanks for the kind thoughts, Aaron.

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  3. Be safe!! And take care of that leg so you don't wind up with an infection in it.
    Let us know how you guys make out when you can.

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    1. Wouldn't have happened if I hadn't gotten up on the porch roof wearing walking shorts. Any fool knows that. Just shows how you can forget the basics when you'r focused on some problem like a storm. If we lose the internet and phones, which we surely will, I'll be back on line as soon as I can.

      I put some antibiotic paste on the cut. Should be ok.

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  4. Good luck! May you weather the storm in good health.

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    1. It's in the lap of the Gods now. Hopefully by tomorrow morning things will start getting back to normal.

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  5. Good Luck, Harry. We are thinking of you and holding you tight in our hearts. You will ride this one out and we will see you on the other side of this. Think positive. Much love.

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    1. Hey, Tewshooz. I am hoping the worst will pass us by. I have good insurance on the house and the outbuildings, if it doesn't. My wife is watching women's fashion shows on the tv and right now it just feels like a normal rainy day, if a little windy. That's supposed to change as the day goes on, harder rain and much more wind. Should be interesting. Thanks for the good thoughts.

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  6. Stay safe. Please make sure you dress your wounds properly, not macho-half-assed.

    After the storm, check out Duluth Trading Company's Firehose Jeans. They are sorta expensive, but tough as nails and good armor against screwing around on your roof.

    Or wear some chainsaw chaps. Not exactly stylish, but will stop cuts from knives, chainsaws, roof tin, Chihuahuas and other mean, nasty sharp things. What, you don't have a set yet? And you have a chainsaw? For shame. (If you have a set, please ignore shamingness.)

    We here in Gainesville (FL) are listening (at 1:43 EST) to tree branches less than 1/2" bouncing off the roof and sounding like huge-arsed widowmakers capable of crushing Sherman tanks. So far sounds like all the other hurricanes I have been through, since David way back when. And I hope it stays that way. Orlando south has lost power for the most part. We'll see what happens here. Gville got pounded really bad in 2004 when we got pounded by 4 storms (Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne,) so our utility system basically was rebuilt several times. Here's hoping they did quality work.

    Again, stay safe, take a hot shower before you lose power, and keep your head down. Give your wife our collective blog love.

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    1. Hey, Andrew. When I first moved here, I got chainsaw chaps, steel toed boots, a construction helmet, the whole nine yards. Most of it is just hanging out in the barn, it's like being a knight in plate armor, hot and cumbersome. On the other hand, cutting your leg off is no fun either. Since I will be doing any chain saw work by myself this time around, maybe I will break it out. In 1986 when I first moved here, the sight of someone in chaps and a helmet sent the local men into paroxysms of laughter so I quit using the gear. These days I don't much worry about that kind of thing, so I suppose I should use the safety equipment.

      I hope your grid is more resilient and lends itself more to repair than ours. This area got "electrified" in 1934 and a lot of the lines here are essentially the same technology they used back then.

      Good luck down there, as well.

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  7. Oh, yeah...

    Deus Vult!

    Just so you know which Andrew it is. Glad to see you commenting again. First time I've been able to get through. Oh well, enough blabbering, I think I'll peer out of the windows and watch the storm for a while.

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    1. Yeah, I got back on the blog just in time to get washed away by the storm.

      Hope you make out ok.

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    2. Branches and twigs down everywhere. Some heavy rain, but not much for a long time.

      Sometimes it is good to live on top of the ridge that runs down the center of Florida. And being next to a giant sinkhole (southeast section of Payne's Prairie south of Gainesville) that draws off a lot of excess water.

      You, on the other hand, have the winds funneled to you by the mountains.

      Stay safe, keep your heads down.

      Kids still getting the hell out of Ohio?

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  8. Harry, Our thoughts an prayers are with you. I hate night storms, especially after Hurricane Mathew last year.
    Tim & Carol

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    1. Tim, no matter what kind of trauma you are dealing with, it's always a lot worse at night. I'm not sure exactly why. Maybe because people are always worn out at night.

      Thanks for the good Karma. We will be through this by tomorrow, unless there's a lot of damage in the county and then, who knows?

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  9. Harry-all the work and anxiety that you guys are dealing with. No wonder you are exhausted. I hope you were able to sleep well on Sunday night and maybe get some naps in
    today. I will continue to pray for protection for you. Jana

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    1. Yesterday was a booger, Jana. It was mostly physical work, and I hate working on the roof. But it had to be done and my wife helped me as much as she could. I won't let her lift 60 pound bags of cement, or cinder blocks, but she stays out there and keeps me company. She's a good help mate. I am getting long in the tooth for lifting bags of cement, even a 50 lb sack of feed is getting to be a challenge, but you would be surprised what you can do when there's nobody else to do it and it has to be done.

      I slept ok last night, woke up when the wind started and the ran began to hit on the roof, but I could tell by the sound it wasn't anything to worry about yet. Today may be different, but we will see.

      Thanks, I can use all the help I can get. ;-)

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  10. Good luck sir - I hope Irma decides your mountains are too pretty to damage. Hope you and wife heal from your efforts to beef up your property. Stay safe !

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    1. I doubt Irma can hurt the mountains, but she can sure do a number on the roads, utility grid, and on anybody who lives on a steep slope or down by the river or a creek! Been there, done that, and don't want to experience it again. :-(

      Just have to see how it goes. Thanks for the good thoughts.

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  11. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)


    I wish you guys well on your adventure. Try to think of it as an adventure:)

    I found a million dollar house for sale on the island, four bedroom's etc, with unobstructed gulf view's, etc, big window's all over the back of the house, etc, etc. If I was rich. I would still buy the house and pay the insurance, etc. Who cares if it got 'deep sixed' in a major storm. If you saw the ocean view out the back windows, Harry. You would understand.
    One other thing I can say. Padre Island is growing and getting thicker, wider at the expense of Louisiana. Much of the coastal erosion from Louisiana washes down south and has been building up Padre Island for thousands of years. This in turn helps the island of course and the mainland during the storms.
    Beach erosion down here is minimal during storms and it builds back up quickly.

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    1. I expect if you could buy a million dollar house, you'd have enough money that if it got washed away you would be ok. I can sure understand why you would want to have a house on the beach. When we lived on Emerald Isle, we had the intercoastal waterway on one side and the ocean on the other. We had a wrap around porch and I loved to go out there, especially early in the morning or at sunset.

      If you get that million dollar beach house, be sure it has a nice guest room!

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  12. Replies
    1. Yael, I expect a hurricane seems pretty tame to an Israeli. You have to cope with a lot worse. We'll be ok. It's a colossal pain to put up with, is all.

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