Sunday, November 26, 2017

CMP (Civilian Marksmanship Program) to sell M1911 A1 pistols to citizens.





CMP to sell Surplus M1911A pistols to citizens.
By AR Hawkins
28 Nov 2017
President Trump is set to sign the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act, which contains an amendment that allows U.S. citizens to acquire military surplus 1911 pistols.
The sales will occur under the auspices of the Civilian Marksmanship Program, which has been selling approved military surplus weapons to citizens for more than 100 years.
According to the International Business Times, it currently costs the U.S. military approximately $2 a day to store one pistol, and there are an estimated 100,000 1911s that are being stored. So that is a $200,000 expenditure the military can erase and replace with a profit, or at least of a recoup of costs, by selling the firearms.
The 1911 is one of the most popular handguns ever developed. It is valued for military use, home defense, self-defense, and concealed carry. Although the military’s 1911s were made by Colt, citizens have long been purchasing civilian models from Colt as well. These range from the basic government model to 1911s with finely tuned triggers and target barrels that allow for incredible accuracy in competitive shooting.

Kimber, Sig Sauer, Ruger, Smith & Wesson, Rock Island, Springfield Armory, and others produce numerous 1911 variants for the civilian market each year as well. But through the Civilian Marksmanship Program, Americans will not only acquire a 1911, but a piece of U.S. military history, an exciting opportunity.






Here are some links to the CMP site:




Civilian Marksmanship Program home page.

CMP Sales and Services

CMP Eligibility to Purchase Requirements

When I got my M1 Garand back in the early 1990's, you basically had to be a U.S. Citizen, be eligible to purchase a firearm under U.S. law,  belong to a CMP affiliated shooting club (every state has one, you just send in the membership fee and that's it. In Georgia then, it was $15.00 ), and you had to participate in an approved marksmanship event. I went down to River Bend Gun Club and shot in an NRA high power match.  My understanding is that since then, the marksmanship event participation has been waived for all veterans.

CMP is a good outfit.  My rifle was a pristine Springfield from the 1950's.  I have bought a lot of ammo from them, most of it Lake City 30-06, boxer primed military production. I still have two wooden cases of the ammo untouched in storage.



As I mentioned before, the article in the latest Guns Surplus and Classics Arms annual said that CMP will begin selling the first of the M-1 Garands returned to the U.S. from the Philippines in May of 2018.




 We can all thank President Trump and the National Rifle Association  for this opportunity to buy M1911's and M-1 Garands.





20 comments:

  1. over at another blog they were talking about the 1911s and how they could trick them out/rebuild them etc. i would die for one in whatever condition and not change a thing. they forget the history. i'm saving my nickels for an m1. with only 10k to sell a year my guess is the cmp will do a lottery or something to figure out who gets them. being a pistol, i imagine going to anniston to pick one up will be out. we still have two colts, they don't look all that worn.

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  2. RR, I think the price of Garands is about to drop precipitously. There are 86,000 of them coming in from the Philippines. I am also hearing the Trump Department of State is going to reverse the Obama revocation of the import licenses for the Korean Garands and Carbines. Good times!

    The M1911A1 pistols we had in the seventies and eighties in the USMC were pretty shot out. I hope the guys buying them for rebuilding don't forget to see if the pistols they bought were rare, there are some of those old guns worth a small fortune. You are fortunate to have the two government M1911A1 pistols. Real history there and good weapons to boot.

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  3. My fear is that they'll go the same way as so many nice M1 rifles now...the chop-shop gang on the CMP Forum will buy up as many as they can get just to rip them up for collectible parts.

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    1. I had heard that was an issue. Maybe there's some logic behind a limit of one or two guns per shooter per year.

      During the .22LR shortage, the truck used to get to Walmart at about 0600 every other morning. If you went down there so you could be there when they opened the delivery box at the ammo counter, the same batch of old goats was always there. They would get there early, and buy up all the .22 if there was any. Then they sold it at the flea market with a big markup. There was a rule that you could only get 3 boxes a day per customer, but I noticed the weasel that opened the case did not adhere to that. I am sure he was getting some baksheesh on the side.
      I guess there's always somebody looking for an angle.

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  4. $2 per DAY? That's more savings than $200,000 per year for those 100K pistols.

    Or am I misreading something?

    Either way, I'd love to get one, just for the history. I carry a 1911 as a daily carry about half of the time, so I know the care and feeding of 1911's

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    1. I noticed the math didn't work out on that. Maybe the guy meant it cost $200,000 a year. $200,000 a day is a bit much, even for the federal government.

      I used to carry a Kimber .45 , but it's just too heavy now. I still have a few M1911A1's here and there around the house, but they are all commercial production. I'd love to have a real old M1911A1. Would sure feel good to own one.

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  5. I might just buy another Garand!

    I'll definitely check it out for the M1911 pistols.

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    1. Especially if we don't have to jump through all the hoops and wickets, it sounds like too good a deal to pass up. I'm keeping my eye on the situation as it develops, that's for sure.

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  6. Awesome news. I never saw the sense of destroying functional firearms and proceeds that are able to purchase / pay for a self defense firearm for citizens AND profit for the government to spend on something else. Win - win to me, though I'm sure the anti-gun advocates are fit to be tied. Another win for our side !

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    1. If the Schumerites had their way, everything from a kids dart gun on up would be going through the cruncher at Anniston. There are still police departments like New York, Chicago and LA that smelt everything they take in, including priceless museum quality pieces. Just blockheads. I sure hope it all works out, as I'd like to buy an M1911 and a couple of M-1 Carbines. If the price was right, I'd get an M-1 Garand too although I have a couple as it is.

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  7. I hope they sell some parts. I have a 43 Ithaca made pistol, but it has a Colt replacement slide. Not that that is bad mind you... Before I got it long ago, someone had tricked it out with good sights, and the worst set of Target grips ever. I replaced the grip panels long ago, but the sights are great. I want a "stock" Ithaca slide for display purposes, but will keep the Colt for shooting purposes. I figure picking one up that has been checked by CMP is better than buying a random used one from Algores Amazing Internet. Besides the 1911s, I want to see what sort of 22s they come up with. I bought one of the Mossberg44US rifles they had years back. Quite a nice shooter, but boy would I like a Model 40, or a Winchester 75....

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    1. J, a 1943 Ithaca is pretty nice. I can see why you would want a stock slide for it. I wonder if Numerich might have something like that? or Sarco, maybe?

      I know CMP has some 22 rifles and pistols from time to time, but I never actually saw one of them in the flesh. Maybe I should give it some thought though. I don't have much in the way of .22 firearms.

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  8. I really like the 44US. It was supposed to be used, and came without the magazine, but I would be VERY surprised to find it was not new. It was 75 bucks (!!)and the magazine was about the same. I like 22 rifles, and have several, but this will outshoot them all.

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    1. I only have about 4 .22LR rifles, and two of them are Polish M1946 trainers. They look like Mosin Nagant rifles, weigh about the same. I have a few .22LR pistols. I really should put more effort in the .22LR because they are a lot easier on the body than the big, full powered guns are.

      Sounds like you got a really nice deal there.

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  9. If you don't already have one, I recommend a Ruger 10/22. I have a "stainless carbine" with a laminated stock. Like from Walmart, but from 97 or so. I put a cheap scope on it from Ebay, and coughed up for one of the BX triggers. It is a fine little shooter and so far, unbreakable. There are other options for improving the trigger, but the Ruger update works fine.
    I also have a Remington 580 single shot that my dad gave me when I was 10. They made a magazine fed and tube fed version also It has a thin barrel, but over the near 50 years I have shot it, it has also been more accurate than I might have expected. I have exposed a lot of people to shooting with that gun.
    Nice thing about most older 22 rifles is that used, they tend to be cheap. Even if they are "cosmetically challenged" they usually shoot fine. I have refinished a few stocks, and even sort of blued one. It came out OK,the next time I do one, it will be better...

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    1. J, years ago, Ruger released a limited edition set, stainless steel Ruger Mini-14 and a stainless steel 10/22. Both had green camo pattern synthetic stocks. I bought the set, but have hardly ever fired either weapon. I do like the 10/22. I thought about buying one of those take down versions just for the "coolness" factor but never did.

      I've got a "Cricket" and a Canadian Youth Model .22 rifle, but they were trainers for my children, now long gone. I am hoping if I have grandchildren I can pass those guns on to them.

      It's good to be able to work on your guns. I've passed many a quiet and restful hour doing that kind of thing myself.

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  10. Ah, I wondered why that guy at this past weekend's gun show was selling all of those Garands. Had at least a dozen, priced at $1000 - $1500 according to condition. Garand bayonets from a $60 reproduction to $120 genuine long bladed model, all complete with sheaths.

    I'm surmising the man knew that the price of these was going to drop soon, and figured he better git while the gitting was good. I was a little tempted by one of the bayonets but the rifles are a little too high for me. I already have a pair of them anyway - three is pushing it.

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    1. For a long time, there wasn't anything official about the big batch of rifles coming in, and I was afraid to say much about it because it was just scuttlebutt. However, now the story is on a lot of reputable web pages, and even on MSM. The MSM is squawking about importing the guns, though to my knowledge no one has ever used a CMP M-1 Garand, etc. to rob a liquor store. Fox has given it some favorable coverage.

      One they bring that many guns in, with the possibility of three times more than that if the Korean guns are imported, the price will have to drop. If it does, I might pick up a few just so my kids, and their kids if any, have access to them.

      That's a lot of money. I recently spent a good chunk on a gun I'd wanted forever and a day, but it would have to be something like that for tight fisted me to let go of that much jing.

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  11. Harry,

    Interesting! I'm sure Bulldog Man's aware of the surplus...if not, I'll be sure he reads your post.

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    1. Sandy, I expect he knows about it. Might be a good time to pick up an M-1, you can never have too many!

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