Thursday, March 15, 2018

New movie, New magazine premiers, some good catalogs.



There's a new movie coming out, Seven Days at Entebbe.  It's a remake of the old Charles Bronson film, which was pretty good.  I plan to go see it when it gets around to our theater.




I remember when the Israelis pulled this off.  It was the fourth of July, 1976. I was stationed at Quantico, Virginia and there was a big fourth of July celebration at the base. The date sticks in my mind for obvious reasons.

 Everybody admired the Israelis, both for having the courage on the political front to actually do something, and because they were successful. They had only one military casualty, Yonatan Netanyahu. He was the brother of current Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, who was himself a member of the special forces outfit, Sayeret Matkal.  Yonatan Netanyahu was also the leader of the paratroops who executed the raid. The Israeli officers lead from the front.

If you want to brush up on the event, here's the best book I know about it.  Simon Dunstan is a well known author, and the book is published by Osprey, probably the premier military history publisher in the world.



     "It was time so dangerous, that even the ferrets carried guns"  paraphrase of "Conan the Barbarian"


The weather is a little warmer today, just made it to 60 degrees, and not much wind.  I took Percy out for a walk in the meadow. He had to wear his harness, because he's young and fast and I'm old and slow. He enjoyed his time outside though. I didn't bring Spike because he stays pretty well doped up, due to his medical problems, and prefers to sleep when he's not eating.




It's March, so it's windy here. The wind comes tearing down the mountainside, and it sounds like a jet coming over.  When the air is cold, as it has been the last three days, it's a bitter wind. Lots of branches down outside. I worked some this morning on clearing it up.  I'm getting quite a big pile of limbs and smaller branches that I need to burn at some point. Maybe this weekend if we get a light rain.


I got my quarterly Alumni Magazine from the University of New Mexico. I went there from 1971-1975 courtesy of the largess of the U.S. Navy.  Best time of my life, and my reserve unit was a good bunch of guys.  


Although I enjoy reading about the university, what I really want the magazine for is the section that tells what Alumni are doing, by year group.  It will say "Joe S. Ragman, 75, has retired from Fedex where he was a pilot for 22 years" or things like that.

The other section I always read, with considerably less pleasure but no less interest, is "In Memorium."


It tells you who has died, by year group.  I almost always see someone I know, these days.



New Magazine shows up:







I got this first issue of "American Pioneer" out of the blue. I never heard of it, but it's the same format as Off Grid and American Survival Guide.  Oversized, very high quality paper, and I expect it's expensive. I have no idea how they picked me, unless it's because I already subscribe to their other magazine and look like a good prospect.

It really reminds me of survival magazines from the 1970's and 1980's.  Back then, the whole mind set was bugging out to the mountains when the Russians nuked us, and surviving off the land. My earliest memories of school are doing "duck and cover" drills where you shut the curtains in the classroom and then everybody hid under their desk so you would be "safe" from the Russian bombs.

The Day After  (head for the woods before the sirens go off!)


Nobody doubted it was going to go just the way life was depicted in this movie. This is absolutely what everyone expected to happen, sooner or later.  The entire time I was in the Marines, it was the Russians we prepared to fight.  The survivalist mindset then was to get out into the woods, mountains, desert, anywhere away from urban centers, and live off the land.



American Pioneer actually looks pretty good.  There are articles on firearms, fieldcraft, hunting, fishing, reloading.  I'll probably either buy it on the news stands, or if it doesn't show up there, I'll subscribe. Now a days, people worry more about natural disasters, and "bugging out" isn't the be all and the end all, but you never know.


New catalogs:






I've always enjoyed the BudK catalog, and I bought a lot of things from them. Both for my own use, and as barter goods.

The CHKadels catalog is new, this is only the third issue as far as I know, but it's loaded with good things. I  have managed to find one item in each catalog that I ordered, because I wanted the goods but also because I want to stay on their mailing list.


It's been a good week for mail. I also got my new Northern catalog.  If you live out in the countryside and have to do all your own repair work, you can't live without this

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All of these catalogs are free.  I don't have any financial ties to any of them, but they are fun and sometimes you find things you really need (or just want.)


Cartoons:








Thought for the Day:



Quote for the Day:










22 comments:

  1. "Israeli officers lead from the front." - EVERY officer of every nation used to do that in the old days, even many of the kings. Then the idea came along that the grunts were expendable and brass should be protected.

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    1. I think having the officers out front generally went out of style after the first world war. In the Second World War, the basic American unit of maneuver was the fire team, then the squad, then the platoon, then the company, then battalion, then regiment. You didn't actually have an officer at the helm until you hit platoon. Tactics just evolved that way. There still were officers, like the platoon commander in "The Pacific" who was killed on Okinawa, but the vast majority remained "in the rear with the gear" either by necessity, since their jobs required them to, or because they didn't want to get killed.

      Not much has changed since then. Israel is organized differently, and they've always emphasized leadership from the front. It's one of the things they do, like the custom of tank commanders sticking their heads out of the turret cupolas. It makes them very efficient, but they have hideous causalities among their officers. In Beirut, where I had the opportunity to see the Israelis up close, they had Lt.Colonels roaring around in tanks. Very unusual, to say the least. They aren't as "regimented" as we are in that regard.

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  2. With the local hardware stores being totally yuppy-fied I would have a hard time without Northern Tool.. Sometimes they piss me off [but at my age nearly everybody does] but they are the only game in town for the stuff I need on my farm, other than Tractor Supply, and they have pretty much whatever I need and their prices are usually good and they ship it to you promptly.-ken

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    1. Ken, I can always find the odd bit of gear or equipment that I need, and it works as advertised , as well as being fairly priced. I keep my Northern Tool catalog in my desk, and it gets well worn. I'm glad to hear your experience has been similar.

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  3. one thing i always liked and respected about israel was that their military leaders became their political leaders. i never knew netanyahu's credentials until now. i am even more impressed with him now. alas, like the u.s., today's youth have had it too easy in israel and no longer respect the old guard that saved their parents very lives in the 40's thru the 60's until today. why is it that we humans, gifted with the ability to record history, continue to repeat past mistakes? isn't this what separates us from all other life on earth? egad....

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    1. Netanyahu was wounded in action, and has a pretty seriously solid military record. I've always liked the guy. I wouldn't want his job, given that Israeli politics make American backstabbing look childish in comparison, but he's done a good job of it.

      I recently had the opportunity to talk to a couple of 17 -19 year olds at the car wash. I was surprised at how little they knew. For instance, as unbelievable as it seems, neither of them could identify Benjamin Franklin. ISYN.

      If there's no concept of continuity and history in a people's culture, there's nothing to sustain the positive aspects of that culture. It's sad, and it's maddening as well.

      On the other hand, these two fellows knew everything there was to know about dirt bikes and sports......

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  4. http://www.1000flags.co.uk/australia-eureka-stockade-battle-and-usa-confederate-friendship-table-flag-24215-p.asp

    G'day there Harry, I will definately go to see this movie, all you ever seem to get here at the theatre are endless marvel comic movies!!! I absolutely refuse to watch anything that has a "super hero/debased Nordic God" in it!!!!!!!!!

    Given your problems with the Confederate flag I have attached (if it works) a link showing your "rebel" flag and Australia's "rebel" flag, the Eureka flag. Not sure if you know the history of the flag, it was flown over the Eureka Stockade at Ballarat, Victoria in 1854 during the goldminers uprising against the colonial government.

    I have always liked the flag, the only problem is that it has been hijacked by every fringe and lefty group from the Greens, Communist party of Australia, far left trade unions etc. so I never feel comfortable flying it.

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    1. Sgt, I just fly my Confederate flag and don't worry about the bizarre outfits that use it as well. The exact same thing happens to the American flag, and nobody seems to get a stick up their ass about that, or demand the American flag be taken down....

      I didn't know about your Eurka flag. I'll check out that link, and if I can't make it stick, I'll do some research on my own. I have a sketchy knowledge of Australian history other than military history. I know it was where England dumped off people they deported, way back in the days of sailing ships, but how Australia became the nation that it is, I'm not well acquainted with. I used to have a statue of an Australian bandit from the black powder days, who made himself a suit of armor and robbed people. He was apparently quite famous. I got the statue in japan, of all places. I think it is in a trunk out in the barn now.

      My wife took my Confederate flag off my jeep before we went to Chattanooga! Now I am getting a magnetic one, that we can take off so we won't be set upon by the Abo's in the cities. I have the feeling that somehow that is kind of low down, but I have to agree to the compromise or give up going to Chattanooga or Nashville, I guess. :-(

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    2. I think you will find the whole Eureka Stockade story interesting, there was even an American contingent involved and the US Consulate General was dragged in as well.

      The staue is the infamous Ned Kelly, much rubbish has been written about him and his gang, at the end of the day he was just a thief and he ambushed and murdered three police constables agter they had set up camp for the night.

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    3. I read up on it, and it has some similarities to our "Whiskey Rebellion." Always surprised me that American troops suppressed the Whiskey Rebellion, because the "rebels" had a lot of public support. Seems like the miners in the Eureka Stockade were in a similar position for similar reasons.

      Ned Kelly, I couldn't remember the guy's name but that's it. The Japanese shop keeper who sold me the statute was under the impression that he was a kind of Australian Robin Hood, who fought oppression and helped the weak and needy. I guess he got it wrong, though! Ned's statue is out in my barn, in a crate with other things I had when I got married, which my wife didn't care for. My gigantic Turkish Meerschaum pipe carved in the likeness of a buxom woman is out there, too. :-(

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    4. Yesterday I saw an American flag where one of the white stripes was replaced with a purple stripe; do any of you know what that means?

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    5. Jonathan, I have never seen that before. Maybe someone else who comes by here will know what it means.

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  5. That AMERICAN PIONEER magazine looks interesting, I'll have to give it a look. I look back at the 1980's 'survival' arena with a grin. All you needed was an Australian digger hat, sunglasses, camoflauge vest and a hot girl seated next to you in your Jeep and you were golden !

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    1. I'd settle for that today, myself! It was a lot less structured back then, sure enough. I think it got "commercialized" when that series "Dooms Day Preppers" was on and the companies smelled money. The mind set was also "gentrified" so you have "Survival Mom" instead of Mel Tappan. Like old Archie Bunker and Edith used to sing, "those were the days!"

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  6. Went over to SpecialOperations.com and read about this.

    Great to learn that 'Bibbi' was a member of the special forces outfit, Sayeret Matkal. I've always liked Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu

    And to learn that his brother was the leader of this. And sadly, the only casualty, in this daring operation. Yeah, Israeli officers lead from the front.

    Thank you for this post... I'd never have known any of this, without it.

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    1. Wisps, my memory stretches way back to when these things took place. Sometimes, I feel like the Lone Ranger, because nobody else seems to remember them. Or, if they do, it's like the 300 Spartans, they know it happened but it's so long ago it's not real.

      Glad you enjoyed it. I like Benjamin Netanyahu too. I was furious when the Imam in Chief slighted him, but Obama was kissing the King of Saudi Arabia's ring long before that happened so it really came as no surprise. President Trump has a much better perspective on Israel and it's place in our own security structure.

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  7. Ha ha ha...I love that "button" cartoon. Funny. The ferret photo is cute too. I'm glad you got a chance to take Percy out, he must love all the smells of the woods! I can't wait to get out in the woods myself, but it'll be at least a month yet before all the snow has melted enough to walk there. Pretty windy these days here too.

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    1. Branco comes up with some really good cartoons. I like the hillbilly ferret with his blunderbuss. It fits their nature.

      Percy dotes on the trips outside, and he would be happier if he wasn't restrained with his little harness (it looks just like the rig on an old T-10 parachute) and his leash. But he'd run off into the woods and I'd not be able to find him, which would mean his demise.

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  8. Harry,

    I got the same magazine, the same way, out-of-the-blue. Pretty interesting stuff. I expect an "invitation" to subscribe soon; probably will for a year or so.

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    1. JP, I was in town yesterday, and I saw the magazine on the stand at Walmart. I will pick up the next couple of issues and see if it's worth subscribing, usually those run about $38.00 a year in that size and format, if they are bi-monthly. I'm not sure if this is every month or not, but I agree, it was interesting and also "different" which has some value in itself.

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  9. I've tried to do some more reading on what has really happened that North Korea is willing to negotiate; I haven't found much beyond this very interesting piece about how North Korea's hacking of South Korea made a difference: https://strategypage.com/htmw/htintel/articles/20180223.aspx

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    1. I haven't seen much on the particulars of that either. Thanks for sending the link.

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