Saturday, April 14, 2018

Another big storm coming. New Jeep Model . Bugging out holds little attraction for me.



This one is going to be bad.  Lots of wind, very heavy rain.  The leading edge should be getting here around midnight tonight.  Sure thing there will be trees down, and the power will go.  I'm about to go out and clean all the up slope diversion ditches out, to keep the water coming down the mountain from getting up against the foundations of the buildings. That's about all I can do that I haven't already done. The generator is working, so if the power goes out it will be noisy but not dark.


I'm riding up to Hayesville, North Carolina this afternoon to look at Jeeps. I saw one of the new 2018 Wrangler JL versions in town, and really liked it. They start at about $30,000 new, which is steep but doable.







I was reading through an old book today, from about 10 years ago when most people were still planning on "bugging out" when the fewmets hit the windmill.  Granted, if you live in a city or a suburb, that's probably the only option you have, but I'm forting up and sheltering in place. The movie "The Road" made a big impression on me, in terms of the vulnerability of those who hit the trail.

Not least of which is vulnerability to the hordes of predators that would be unleashed by the breakdown of order. We're not even to that point yet, and they're still wrecking havoc on decent people today.








If you get caught out in the open, in line of march with dependents, Good Luck, Buddy.




It might be a better idea to do some preplanning and at least have a place to go to when the inevitable finally occurs. There are some new books out on survival retreat planning, but here are a couple of old standbys.








This is a new book, just released, that I have not read yet. However, I've seen reviews of it on other survivalist oriented blogs, and people seem to like it.  I need to order a copy and see if there's anything in it that will help me improve my situation up here on the mountain top.




Sheltering in Place is not a bad idea if you plan it out ahead of time.  Two books that aren't specifically oriented towards the survival retreat, but closely aligned with the subject are :









I like living way out here in the woods. I like the quiet, the lack of interaction with human beings on a ground level, and the freedom that entails.  It has it's ups and downs, as anyone who comes by here often knows. But overall, you can't beat it.  And when the house of cards we call our "society" finally comes crashing down, I'd rather be sitting up here, than down in Atlanta.....





Home, Sweet Home.  Festung Harry.



Abbey:






Levity:









44 comments:

  1. thanks for the storm map. got to get things in off the porch.

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    1. This thing is a big one. They are getting pounded with snow up North. Was watching the Weather Channel a few minutes ago, and they said in the South, the front is moving very slowly, and some places will get eight inches of rain overnight. I sure hope we are not one of them.

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  2. There's no shade tree mechanic with a modern vehicle. You can still change your oil, but you need to but a computer to talk to your vehicles for trouble shooting problems.

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    1. That's one reason I like my 1999 Cherokee Sport so much. But I also really like these new jeeps, and I was never very well versed in vehicle maintenance skills anyway.

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  3. As frugal as you are, I am surprised you don't wait for year end sale on that model. Saw that storm coming your way on weather maps....lots of wind here this year, too. Lucky it is not snow, Harry...northern tier states seem to be buried in it. Take care, my friend.

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    1. I'm not sure but I think these are new for 2018, so I would have to wait a long time. I had never seen one before until I saw this one in town, and I'm a huge Jeep fan. I didn't make it to Hayesville to look at them today, took too long to get everything squared away for this storm and wore me out.

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    2. As far as bugging out goes, we are not interested, either. We have hardened our place, like you and are secluded. Besides, we have lived here over 20 years and know the terrain well. I just don't like city people moving in bringing their liberal ways with them. They are so stupid and have no respect for anything.

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    3. You have the ideal situation. I can't think of anything in the way of natural disaster that would threaten you where you are, short of an Asteroid or Super Volcano , neither of which is likely. I remember when I was out in your area, thinking what an outstanding environment it was for a survivalist retreat.

      Before the last few months, I would have said that there was no chance of a horde of undesirables moving in where you are. But I thought that about my own area and nothing could have been further from the truth.

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    4. Undesirables have a way of disappearing around here.

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    5. I wish that was the case here. The ground is too full of roots and flint, though, and it's red clay, hard to dig.

      This Sunday, I heard another interesting scanner conversation. While people were in church, some one or some group went into the parking lot and randomly vandalized their cars. Doesn't seem to be any rhyme or reason to it. To my great surprise, no angels appeared to strike down the malfeasnts. I'm pretty sure this will turn out to be the work of some of our new "residents' up on the hill, though I have no idea, unless the perpetrators are Moslems, why they would trash random vehicles at a church.

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    6. reason has nothing to do with it.
      they are just criminals, and if no big crime is afoot a small crime will fill the void until something terrible transpires.

      the Bible says that the tares grow with the grain until the end [the harvest], meaning there will always be wicked people.

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    7. I have heard tell of people disappearing off the Appy trail into those deep, dark woods, never to be heard from again. Easy to get totally lost, I reckon.

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    8. Deb, the thing is, we never had that here before the "p.j. people" got here. My guess is that someone has it in for Christians, though I can't think of anyone but the Muzzies who would fit that bill.

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    9. Tewshooz, a dead body is really hard to carry far. It's just like hauling a sack of feed or cement, it shifts on you. Maybe one of those little carts like deer hunters use to haul deer out of the woods, though......

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    10. Just guessing, of course. Ahem.

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  4. harry, had a c5a galaxy cruise overheard today at low altitude. first one i've seen here, no big deal except its a commercial lane and it was zipping by at about 1200 feet. spidey senses all a tingle. have fun jeep shopping buddy. we're supposed to get a taste of that storm up here tomorrow. what a beautify fri/sat though. take care.

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    1. Wow, I didn't know those things were still flying! Been a long , long time since I've seen a Galaxy in the air. Wish I had seen that....

      Today was really nice, and yesterday was a nice day too. It's about seven p.m. here now, and you can tell the storm is coming. All overcast and windy. Not cold yet though.

      I didn't make it up to Hayesville, got too embroiled in preparations for the storm here. Lots of work to be done getting the ditches cleaned out, checking gutters, etc.

      I expect tomorrow will be all messed up, with power out and downed trees. But Monday I can make it up to North Carolina to the dealership where that fellow got his Jeep. He said they had some more on the lot.

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  5. Batten Down The Hatches, Harry!

    We've been unusually dry here this last winter, but it's been very windy. We've had sustained winds of 40+ MPH, with gusts over 60.

    Makes my antenna swing back and forth like crazy, but it's staying up, which is a Good Thing!

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    1. Wind is rough on an antenna field. There's a big pole sticking up out by my shop, where a storm knocked over the antenna I was using on my CB. It was a 20 foot whip, on a 20 foot pole. I never repaired it because the locals who used CB to "visit" apparently never got their gear back up after that storm either.

      I don't know what kind of wind we will get here tonight, but hopefully nothing like you have experienced. 40+ is not good for a shake roof, and 60+ is unthinkable.

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  6. I'm sitting out this storm at my daughter's in Mass..

    As for bugging out, it's something I think about a lot. First choice is to bug in, and that's from a guy who travels a lot. There are places where I feel fairly confident where I could hunker down for a long time. One thing about doing a lot of travel, you find out how areas really are. Some places look good on paper but have fatal flaws for bug out locations.

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    1. You're pretty well set up to find some quiet spot and wait for developments. You already have all the equipment you need, and you use it routinely on your trips so you have the prerequisite skills. I know your place is up there in the North, and in a relatively rural and tranquil setting. Seems like to me you have the best of both worlds.

      Before I bought this place here, I looked at a lot of other areas. I particularly liked a piece of land up in rural Virginia, but that was in 1986 and the area I was looking in is suburbia now. Not that the part of North Georgia I chose at the time bears any resemblance today to what it was then, either.

      Even with the negative developments here now, I can't think of any place I could go that would be so superior that it would justify the abandonment of 30 + years worth of acquired supplies and equipment. Once I would have said that anyone living in this county would be able to weather a disruption. Not now though. The "projects" up on the mountainside would empty out their occupants like ants from a kicked over ant mound if "law and order" broke down. It would be like the L.A. riots on steroids.

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  7. Lot of rain little else I'm 3 hours into that weather wall now.Have a good time jeep shopping but their like women nice to look at ,fun to drive and HELL TO PAY FOR !!!!!

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    1. Gary, Sunday morning here now. Rain started , heavy and hard, about one this morning and is still going. The Atlanta weather stations say that it will be out of the area by around 4:00 this afternoon.

      There are some similarities between the two, now that you mention it....

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  8. I agree with your comments about bugging out. It may be necessary for some people, but the real problem is what can happen to you on the way between Point A and Point B.
    I read recently that more deaths occur during hurricane evacuations than during the hurricane itself. Mainly traffic accidents, but also problems from being immobilized in gigantic traffic jams, such as being swept off the road by flash floods and robbery-murder. I don't know if I entirely believe the report (even though it's on the internet, so it has to be true), but I'd rather deal with the devil I know.
    Good luck with this storm. It's really been a, uh, interesting winter.

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    1. Old 1811, the last few winters here have been different from "the norm" and I think this one has been the strangest of all. It's like winter just won't let go. I , for one, am heartily sick of storm after storm running through the mountains here. I can't count how many times this year I thought Spring had finally arrived, and then the "cold arctic air mass" showed up again.

      Going out on the road means you forfeit just about all the elements of control you have at your own place. You are also at the mercy and whim of the "mob", and people under stress in large numbers have a bad reputation. I have several books on Katrina and what when on in New Orleans during the storm. Almost unbelievable, the behavior exhibited by some of the denizens of that area, when society broke down. The government tried hard to cover up the frequency and severity of the breakdown, particularly as it related to minorities and their behavior, but anyone can buy the published accounts of people who were there and figure it out for themselves.

      It's possible a fire could burn the mountain here and drive me out, but I can't think of any other circumstances where I would be better off living out of the back of my jeep than up here on the mountain top.

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    2. we lived in florida when part of north miami was burned down by our fellows of the darker skinned persuasion.
      had a friend with buddies in the police department.
      the news carried nothing of the carnage that took place. he wouldn't tell us most of what the police faced. he did tell us about people having their ears chopped off. if that were the least of it only God knows what tortures were endured by innocent citizens. they were just as cruel to the other dark ones and burned the entire neighborhood. businesses there never went back.
      then the perpetrators cry that there are no pharmacies or drug stores!! of course not. they destroyed them all. that was about 40 years ago.
      do you wait until the termites have destroyed your home or do you call the exterminator when you first discover them?

      forget the hard soil. there are acres of untracked forest out there. it'll do if necessity strikes.

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    3. When the Morlocks go on a rampage, about the only thing you can do is flee. I've never heard of anyone successfully resisting them except the Korean shop keepers during the L.A. riots, and the press was full of weeping and whining about how horrible it was that the Koreans shot blacks just to protect "material things" like their stores.

      Like I was telling Tewshooz, carrying a dead body back in the woods is not a lot of fun. Try picking up a fifty pound sack of feed, or a fifty pound bag of cement, then thing of something that hard to carry that weighs 200 lbs. It's rough. Not that I speak from experience, of course. Ahem.

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  9. Bought a retreat as bug out is only a short term deal. Also bought both books you highlight and a few more. Didn't really find them very useful. Either they deal with obvious things or they are so general to be useless. They also fail in some important things like the probably fact that every pine forest in the country will burn from one end to the other. It's real hard to keep them from doing so when there are people to fight the fires. Imagine what a few million citizens camping in the woods will do.

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  10. Uhm, well, the Smokey mountains are about 90% covered in pine, so there's that.... but no place is perfect. I thought about living out in the desert, which would have eliminated the fire problem, but then, there's the issue of water. Forest fire is a big threat for me, but there seems to always be one big "something" to deal with. If you live along the coast, it's hurricanes. If you live in California, Oregon, Washington State it's earthquakes and tsunamis. If you live in the middle of the county, it's the New Madrid Fault. There's always something.

    Here's the thing about survival books. They tend to be useful in "gleaning." That is, I never read one and had an epiphany moment. Rather, I would read on through and then come across something that struck me as useful, I hadn't though of before. Probably the less you know about survivalism and the survival retreat, the more useful an individual book will be. There are times when I pay ten dollars for a copy of "Off Grid" or "American Survival Guide" and I get nothing out of it. But, ever so often, I find something that I can implement to improve my procedures up here.

    I guess even Ragnar Benson, when he was alive, read other people's survival books to "keep his hand in." However, he could probably have done just as well without doing so, so I guess it is a matter of individual taste and perspective.

    I do keep a lot of books for my "professional library." When I was in the Marines, it was mostly military history that I read. Since 1986, the books that I read for knowledge, rather than just entertainment, tend to be survivalist oriented.

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  11. Interesting list of books and the choices they encourage. I added "The Postman" (the book, not the movie) to the list and decided a small town (in a food producing area far from population centers) was the choice for me.

    Love the clip from the Two Towers with Brad Dourif (Wormtongue). He's one of the unsung but outstanding talent in that series. When I'm annoyed with someone I sometimes find myself muttering "his cloth is poor...' It makes me laugh.

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    1. I've never actually read "The Postman" because I thought it would be like the movie, which didn't really interest me much. Now I'll get a copy from the library.

      Small towns are good. Hopefully, not on a major transportation artery or near any urban centers. As my own experience has proven, though, you can meet your parameters, and then things change on you down the road.

      That's a classic line, the "cut supreme." Wormtounge always reminds me of one of the people I worked with in Oil and Gas, always sucking up to the boss and trying to run everybody else down......

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    2. Well, there's "The Postman" as a short story, then as a novella, then as a full-fledged book. All by the same author, so as the page count goes up the story expands. I liked the short story and the novella, the full book was good but kinda went off a deep end.

      The movie did a complete Disney to the story. Names and locations are the same, but the plot was changed to protect someone. It was okay as a movie, but most people would have been bored with it if they followed the original story, which is just about a guy trying to survive who falls into his role (again, gets kinda off the rails in the full book.) Much better story than the war kerfuffle they made out of it in the movie.

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    3. Andrew, I'm definitely going to get a copy of the book. I was looking through my books last night, and thinking that there just aren't any good survivalist books out there anymore of the caliber of the "Deep Winter" series or "Lights Out." Sounds like "The Postman" is well worth a read. I discounted the book because the movie wasn't too good.

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  12. well we made it. tornado hit about 10 miles away, tore up a bunch of homes. actually, demolished a few. tore up some businesses just south of us. we never got more than a rumble of thunder. few injuries, no fatalities, thank the lord.

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    1. Whoa. That's awfully close. Hurricanes are like artillery fire. If you occupy the same space at the same time, your number is up. I'm glad it missed you. We just got heavy rain here, and wind.

      Today, there are thick snow showers, intermittent, and it's not cold enough for it to stick but it's mid day and low thirties!

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    2. brrrr! we had flurries last night. I thought we were supposed to be thru with this stuff. guess I complained too loudly about cutting the grass in mid april and the big guy heard me. we'll be moaning about the heat/bugs/snakes soon enough,lol.

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    3. It's Wednesday afternoon here now. We had massive snow flurries on Monday, never seen the like this late in the year. And yet, today, it's 80 degrees and I'm running the air in the house.. Strange times, indeed.

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  13. Hi Harry :) I hope the storm wasn't as bad as it looked. Ours was/is pretty bad at the moment but the wind has thankfully died down. Lost power throughout the day and over night, but it's restored thankfully.

    "I like the quiet, the lack of interaction with human beings on a ground level, and the freedom that entails." Perfectly stated. I feel the same way. After surviving the 1998 ice storm in Montreal, with weeks of no power and lots of looting and crime...I will never be back in a city ever again. When we get our place, it'll be our safe haven that's for sure.

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    1. We had some pretty heavy snow showers, and it was cold. That was Monday. Today is Wednesday, and it's 80 degrees. I have the air going in the house. These are really strange times, in more ways than one.

      I saw a Discovery Channel documentary about that ice storm, and it looked pretty bad. People were burning their furniture and cutting down ornamental trees for wood to stay warm, according to that show. Any time a person depends on the electricity, city water, and city sewage they are really hanging it out there for Mother Nature to give it a kick.

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    2. I was young and naive when that ice storm hit. I was living in downtown Montreal in an apartment COMPLETELY reliant on city water, electricity and sewage. I remember drinking the tap water on day 3 and it gave me such terrible heartburn and indigestion...lord knows what was in that water...then going to the local store to buy water that was 5 times the price it usually was...there was price gouging...all about making a buck on the people who need things. I hated it and it lead me to my dream for self-sufficiency.

      I'll write you an email on the latest S&P saga....

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    3. We had some rough times when we first moved up into the mountains. I was used to the Marine Corps, which can deal with anything. Being on my own, with my wife and new baby, out in the woods was rough. It was a high learning curve. But like you, we made it and we're a lot better equipped for hardship these days.

      Looking forward to your email.

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  14. While it's heavy rain and windy there, we're having snow in Nebraska. That happened this weekend. A great weekend for sure. The male figures in the house ended up having Influenza B, and Mica got a bacterial ear infection on top of that. I'm just lucky I never got influenza! We sat around and watched tv all weekend. Something we rarely do that much of.

    I heard there were tornados not far from here. Some of Nebraska was shut down. I saw pictures of trucks lining the streets. It's better that it's shut down than a bunch of wrecks.

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    1. I knew you folks were taking a beating out there, because you were much on the Weather Channel. I'm really sorry the guys got the flu, it's still making the rounds here too. At least the power stayed on.

      We had wind damage here from the storm, and very heavy snow flurries, but today (Wednesday) it's 80 degrees and hot!

      I hope everybody gets well out there.

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