Thursday, May 3, 2018

.303 British. Going, Going..........

Not so long ago, .303 British military surplus was cheap and readily available.  A wooden case with 820 rounds of Pakistani production ran just over $100.00.

Now, it's a little different.  Got the word from a couple of friends that a small shipment of German production .303 had just come on the market.

You can order here, but as of 2000 Eastern tonight, they only had 23 cans left.

SG Ammo


"500 Round Can of 303 British Surplus Ammo for sale -174 Grain Bi-metal FMJ 1980s Vintage made by MEN in Germany

Brass Case, Berdan primer, non-corrosive, ball powder, flat base 174 grain magnetic bi-metal jacket projectile with lead core. This ammo looks extremely nice, almost like new. Was stored in environmentally controlled facility for the past 35 years and it shows in the condition of the cans and ammo. This is a rare item to see in the USA, surplus ammo has become scarcer and scarcer over the years, and its been a long time since quality 303 Brit ammo has been an option. 20 rounds per box, 25 boxes per M2A1 Ammo Can."


They want $229.50 plus about $20.00 shipping.   

The good thing about Berdan primed ammo is that you don't have to police up the cases, because you can't reload it.  So you and fire and flee if need be.  

If you spent the same money on Boxer primed ammo, which you could reload, you might get around 250 rounds.  Depending on how you reload, in terms of sizing, charge, etc, you might actually get a whole lot more rounds out of the Boxer over time.  But then, you'd have to have made an initial investment in equipment and powder, and you'd have to know how to do it.  Overall, this looks like a pretty good deal, and it's rare.  Very rare.



This is not a very long post tonight, but I'm running low on steam. It was a busy day.  I wanted to get the word out in case somebody needs .303, and I appreciate the two fellows who went to the trouble to send me the link to the page.


Cartoons:















14 comments:

  1. YouTube, converting berdan to boxer.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkKJfvMyuDg

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    1. James, I know it's theoretically possible. Back when 8X56R Hungarian boxer primed brass was not in existence, I actually tried it. Bought a Berdan decapper and the whole nine yards. My efforts were an abysmal failure and I gave it up.

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  2. Great Nobel peace prize cartoon :).

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    1. Branco is a great cartoonist. He is also one of the few who will let you post his cartoons..... most of the others you have to "pirate."

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  3. Actually you can reload Berdan cases : you have to drill through it with.

    I use a 4mm drill to remove the stump and remove the primer (a small screwdriver helps), then a 2mm drill for the flash hole.

    Special Berdan primers exist, but they lack an anvil. You'll have to reclaim them from large primers that have already been shot. (To get clean these anvils I put them in a sock, tie a knot with the sock and put it in the laundry. They come out pristine).

    It seems like a lot of work but on the other hand, it's free brass.

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    1. Ave, it can be done, but these days, I can get Boxer brass for all my rifles so I just think of it as being in the "too hard" category. As I mentioned to James up above, I did try it, many years ago, and I still have the Berdan decapper around here somewhere, but my efforts did not inspire confidence and I gave it up as impractical. Clearly though, you have the drill down. I'm just glad that I can buy the Boxer primed stuff these days for everything I shoot. Even 8X56R Hungarian, which Star Line makes a run of every few years! ;-)

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  4. I kick myself daily that I didn't buy war surplus guns when it was cheap. I remember seeing racks of SMLEs, Mosins, heck even a few Krag-Jorgensens, all selling for pocket change (by today's standards.) But... nooooo... I always assumed when I had the cash I'd be able to snag a Garand, or a Springfield or whatever.

    Kicking myself, kicking myself, kicking myself.

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    1. I know the feeling. But the thing is, even when the rifles were cheap, money was often a bit scarce and hard to come up with. I used to put 10 rifles at a time on "lay away" and pay them off over several months. The best part of it, aside from not having to come up with a princely sum all at once, was that the manager let me go in the back room and cherry pick the guns I wanted. Those were the days!

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  5. I was going to go to Jim Dakin's blog to let him know, but he was Johnny On The Spot !

    I did not know about that method of fixing Berdan cases - worth knowing, thank you Ave for that.

    I remember ads in 1960's gun ads, SHERWOOD something about surplus firearms for really good prices. Then in the late 80's, surplus came back like gangbusters. Whoa man, GOOD TIMES. Swedish, German , Argentinian, Swiss and many many others. For less than a C Note in many cases.

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    1. I started serious collecting in 1986, the year I left the Marine Corps and came up into these mountains to live. Your description of the late eighties is right on target, and the surplus stayed plentiful until Clinton became President, although George II was no friend to military firearms collecting.

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  6. wish i could partake of the deal, but priorities...too many outlays this month, not enough inputs. today i saw a czech surplus pistol on sale for 69 dollars MORE than an new gun. and i saw 699.00 MAUSERS!!! i bout fell out. i may have a springfield 03 coming though. its going to take a bit of work but its free. the best kind. take it easy friend, we ain't as young as we once was, lol.

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    1. RR ,I'm about tapped out this month too. 💸

      Been helping the kids out some after their move, and I bought that air gun that sure wasn't in the budget. Friend of mine, who has known me a long time, asked me if the wife knew I bought it yet.😯

      That could have been awkward , as I had just preached a pious sermon to the whole family not long ago, on the importance of having a budget and adhering to it religiously. 😮

      However, I slyly suggested to the wife that we go to her favourite women's store and do some shopping. She was very happy with some new blouses and the sales lady complemented her on what a good husband I was to shop with her and be so encouraging.😊

      Then on the way home I casually mentioned I had purchased "an air gun" to keep the chickens off the roof and scare away the coyotes. She didn't even give it a thought. I have learned some things about marital survival in the last 33 years.😁

      You are so right about not being as young as we once were. I feel it every morning when I get up and break out the extra strength Tylenol.

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  7. you are the master, sensei. lol. I kinda do the same thing, encouraging my wife's sewing fetish. she often encourages me to buy when I'm on the fence about a gun or whatever. sometimes I wonder who's being played, me or her.

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  8. It's about keeping the wife happy. Also about "slight of hand and misdirection" like the bean under the cup game. But I tend to emphasize the "keep her happy" part of it. ;-)

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