“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Grain Mills

Some time back we were discussing making cracked corn for chicken feed out of whole kernels.  The fellow who writes the blog My Adventures in Self Reliance My Adventures in Self Reliance  recommended the Cereal Killer Grain Mill.  I went to that web page and they had quite a selection of different mills.





Grain mills web page


This may seem like a mundane topic but a grain mill is important.  I have a vast amount of red wheat stored in nitrogen flushed Mylar bags, packed in sealed pails.  If  I need to eat it, it'll have to be milled. I don't picture myself out on the porch placidly grinding away with my matate.  What I have instead is a nice grain mill that can be worked by hand, or by hooking it up to a bike or a small motor.


Shopping for a grain mill, or even allocating funds for one, is not very exciting.  It's a lot more entertaining to go to the store and buy bulk packed food, or order freeze dried food in cans. Even if you don't store wheat or corn, though, at some point you are going to have to eat food that you grew or traded for. That will make a grain mill a precious commodity, and not one you are likely to be able to acquire post collapse. So if you haven't got one, perhaps it would be as well to put it on the list of things you need.  If you do have one, try it out. You may find that buying one you can run off a bike frame is well worth the extra money. Once you get older and start having to deal with arthritis in your wrists, turning the crank on a grain mill is something to be dreaded. Pedaling on an old bike frame is not so bad.  If you have a generator, you could buy a little motor to do the same thing in less space, but that would only work while you had fuel.

20 comments:

  1. Jamie writes one of the finer blogs out there relating to prepping.

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  2. Yeah. Basic and focused. He works at it day by day, accomplishing things on his priority list as he can. He's a good writer, as well. I stop by there every time I see he has a new post up.

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  3. bahahahahahah! oh Harry - jamie is a girl!!! i love her blog! she is a very good friend and i have learned much from her! she is a disabled vet but you would never know it! i sometimes read what she has done over a day or two and i come away sweating and needing a nap! she's awesome!

    your friend,
    kymber

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    1. Jamie is a girl? I saw she was a disabled vet and I thought she was a man because of that. Guess these days that's not a valid assumption.

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  4. Replies
    1. Just another example of the times passing me by. Life gets more like a Heinlein novel all the time.

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  5. Don't be mean guys, LOL
    Harry don't sweat it with a name like Jamie, it's often assumed it's a take off on James.
    Thank you for the compliments especially on the writing. I wanted to become a better writer and a few "Real writers" suggested starting the blog as practice.

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    1. I'm an older guy, Jamie and I knew you were a vet so I thought you were a man. In my day we had women in the Marines but they were well back, in the rear with the gear. I still don't think of women as being at risk but of course that's not how it is. Sorry.

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  6. We have The Barley Crusher, my husband has been using it to mill the grain for his beer making. It works well. It can be hand cranked or hooked to a drill but they don't recommend an electric motor because it turns too fast. You could hook it up to something that is geared down.

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    1. I'm going to rig something on an old bike frame, so I can sit there and pedal while the wife puts whatever we need milled in the hopper.Right now we just turn the crank but it's surprisingly difficult with corn kernels. Your husband makes beer? Then you folks will have something to barter, which is good. I plan on going into the gun running trade if everything goes down the drain, myself.

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    2. Problem is, I keep drinking it all up. Hard to barter used beer!

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    3. Yeah, that would put a dint in the inventory.

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  7. I have a couple of hand crank models. One of them is very old and tested but I need a newer model that can be hooked to a bike.

    That last one you have pictured looks interesting.

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    1. We bought that eons ago from Walden Feeds. I think we bought it in 1999, just before the great Y2K event that sort of turned out to be another Great Awakening. All dressed up and no place to go. But the mill has served us well and has never broken down, or needed any work.

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  8. We have a grain mill, not sure which one as it's in a box waiting for us. Will look into this one. I like the super expensive one all the fancy people tout but paying for it then moving that beast would both be problematic.

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    1. We paid a good bit for ours. The one draw back is that we don't want to mount it permanently on something like a table, so I build a portable stand for it. I can take the bolts out and move the stand and the mill separately. The trouble with things like grain mills is you need one, and you need a good one, but they aren't very easy to get excited about and forcing yourself to spend money on them is tough.

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  9. I don't see why you could not grind corn from the feed store (or maybe you do) It's got to be as clean as the pioneers had.

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    1. I don't know the answer to that one. I grind up corn for the chickens when I need to. But I'll tell you this, some weird stuff falls out of those cracked or whole kernel corn sacks. Once I found part of a mummified snake in a sack of corn.

      There's enough corn up here that I can get good, fresh corn most of the time. I'm going to grow some of my own this coming Spring because I'm tired of seeing all these huge gardens on the web and then I have nothing, not even indian corn.

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  10. Duke, From my research grain that becomes animal feed is usually cleaned once. For it to be considered human feed it must be cleaned at least three times.

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    1. Makes sense. I'd darn sure wash it really well in a wash tub if I was going to eat it myself.

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