“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Venturing into town.

I have to go to town today.  I'm not really enthusiastic.  It's hot out there, and we had a big thunderstorm just before dawn so it's pretty humid.  I'm waiting until about two, so I can pick up the mail when I get back. The more I can get done on a trip, the happier I am.


The leaves are starting to change colors and falling off the trees.  I have heard other people make similar observations about their areas, all up and down the east coast.  The Farmers Almanac says this is going to be a bitter winter, and they have a good track record in my experience. I don't know why, I realize the almanac is not "scientific" but they do.  There's a caterpillar here called the "wooley booger."  People say that if you see them early and they are very fuzzy, it means winter will be hard .  I've had big wooley boogers out on the wood pile for a week now.

This is not an academic exercise.  How bad the winter is going to be determines how much diesel I buy for my storage tanks, and how much propane I get in the Fall during the "Fall fill up."  It's a by guess and by golly situation but it can make a big difference. 


It's time to buy some country hams and hang them in the store room.  This is the best time of year to get them,  and they'll keep virtually forever in a cool, dry place.  They aren't cheap though. So if we have a bad winter and the kids don't come down for Thanksgiving and Christmas, I won't need as many as I would if they did come. We usually send them back up with three or four hams. Funny how the weather effects the least little things.

Once mid October gets here, it'll be cool and crisp. That's the best time to pan for gold.  I have plenty of places to pan here, there are more streams in the national forest than you can count. This one,  I can just walk down slope from the house and be at in five minutes. The dogs like to swim and I pan. It's hot and muggy and there are lots of bugs in summer, but Fall is perfect.


I need to finish getting wood in.   There's literally tons of wood on my land, and I do cut some of it up and split it. But without my son to help me,  cutting it up, hauling it to the truck out of the woods, unloading the truck, splitting the wood and stacking it are rough.  Lately I have been buying loads already cut and split so all I have to do is stack them at the house.


Well, better start getting ready to go to town.
 

20 comments:

  1. It's still pretty warm here (85 or so) but I suppose fall will come soon enough.

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    1. Our days hit that but it is cooler at night. Some of the day time temps have been in the mid sixties. It's already September, seems hard to believe.

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  2. Personaly i think its going to be a cold winter.At least diesel propane and wood have a long shelf life.I have some friends they pre buy propane at summer low price for winter delivery some years it saves them a bundle.

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    1. Gary, that's what our Fall Fill Up is. The propane companies offer a reduced rate but you have to buy a lot of it. Even at $2.00 a gallon, filling a 500 gallon tank costs quite a bit. The prices tend to go up in Winter, but propane is tied to the price of a barrel of oil, and lately that has had more to do with politics than anything else. It's hard to know what to do, so I usually take the middle ground and buy just enough to qualify for the Fall Fill Up.

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  3. I just have a feeling it is going to be a bad Winter. I am also behind in the wood I have stored or left over from last year so I need to get started in earnest earlier this year than usual. Typically I have about half a years worth already split and stacked at this time but this year I have maybe two months worth.

    need to get in gear.

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    1. Wood takes a long time, too. I don't know anything that uses up energy like cutting, splitting, hauling and stacking wood. It's good when the wood is all stacked because you can see what you have accomplished. It's bad if they find you laying face down by the wood pile dead. Have to find a happy medium.

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  4. Harry - the farmer's almanac is usually a pretty good "forecast" of what will be coming. we are still enjoying warm temps here and no leaves colouring yet - thank goodness! normally our warmest part of summer is in august but this year, it was actually kind of crappy, rainy and cool. i am praying for a "regular" september which is usually still pretty warm and you can still go swimming - i need a few more dips in the river before end of summer!!! we hate town days, too, and try to cram as many things into that day as possible so that we don't have to go more than once a month! i hope you have a nice trip into town, get yerself something good to eat and get all that you need to get, done.

    your friend,
    kymber

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    1. At least you don't have alligators and sharks in your river. I watched "Kon Tiki" on the pay per view last night and the sharks in that were enough to make you start taking showers and stay out of the bath tub.

      I did get some lunch in town but it wasn't very good. I am still mad at my favorite place and won't go there.

      I went all the way to town , with a shopping list, and when I got home I remembered I'd not bought the most important thing, a bag of ferret kitten chow, so now I have to go back tomorrow. I guess I will go to the dump too so it won't be a wasted trip.

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  5. Funny how people who know that winter is near and that it will be cold are getting ready now. While there are those who will wait until the day before the snow hits the fan.

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    1. It's the old grasshopper and ant story. I guess if you live in suburbia there isn't much to get done, but if you live in the sticks it's a lot of work. Once the snow falls it's really too late to do a lot of stocking up and fixing.

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  6. I like to get as many things done at once as well. I haven't noticed leaves changing in color in Nebraska just yet. It is getting darker way earlier though.

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    1. Nebraska. That's a tough place to live in winter, I think. Seems like you get real blizzards there. I was thinking the other night it's getting darker earlier now. Pretty soon they'll change the time again I guess.

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  7. I wonder if you get much color in those streams? I started panning myself and the stuff around my place is so fine I can hardly see it. Didn't think I would need glasses at 45. Oh well.
    --Troy

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    1. There's some gold in the streams. I don't do it full time of course, and I don't have all the illegal equipment that some folks use up here, like power dredgers. I just go out and pan for the fun of it. North of me they get rubies, emeralds and other gem stones but in my area gold is the thing.

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    2. Harry, maybe try a sluice. I fill a few 5 gallon buckets in the fall. And do a little panning at home during the winter.
      You could also make up a little sluice out of some poop tube. Cut length wise, and tack to a board. Good for running concentrates through.

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    3. Flier,
      I guess I could do that. I watch "Gold Fever" on the Outdoor Channel and I have seen people with similar equipment at those meets the Gold Prospectors of America Association sponsors.

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  8. Harry,
    Interesting that you are talking about a bad winter over there. It is the 4th day of Spring here and already the weather forecasters are saying we are going to have a hot summer with a high bushfire danger. The roof is covered on leaves and stuff from winter so i know what I'll be doing on the weekend. Temps are nice now, 73 deg during the day and 53 deg at night but that is going to change faster than usual - Adelaide has already had a couple of days of 90 deg, I hope we don't get a repeat of last summer, here in Sydney we had a week of over 95 deg days topped off by the hottest day on record - 112 deg

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    1. I saw some of those fires on television and they were horrific. We are just finishing up a bad fire season here, although it's the west that has most of the really bad ones. I'm ready for fall, it has been hot and rainy here. We set records for the wettest summer our state has known since they started keeping records in the 1880's. Now we are infested with mosquitoes, as well as mold and mildew. Not to mention the bizarre white fungi that are growing all over the forest.

      Yeah, you better get the roof cleaned off. I have cedar shake roofs on my buildings. If we have a fire, I'm done.

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    2. I have terracotta roof tiles, house was built in the 60's and they were popular at the time, I have to worry about the gutters as that is where the fire starts and then gets under the eaves and into the roof. When the fires get close standard procedure here is to block all of the downpipes and fill the gutters with water, then put wet towels at each door to keep out smoke. We have a mould problem in the house in winter, it is better now I have a gas heater as it warms the house better than electric heates can.

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    3. If I stay up here or turn the place over to my son, I'm going to have metal roofs put on all my buildings. It will cost a lot, but it beats clambering around on the roof replaces bad shakes. It's also a lot better for fire protection. In winter it is so dry here I have to run humidifiers to keep everything from drying out and crumbling or rotting. I use propane heaters that are not dependent on electricity, since I lose power frequently and my generator can't run electric heaters, the load is too great.

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