“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Friday, September 13, 2013

You can get sick but life does not care.

Fortunately for me, I am feeling better today.    Not 100% but not miserable.  This is just as well, since events continue to move along in the outside world.


I once had a nice little Jeep Wrangler.  It's the only vehicle I ever bought new.   It didn't get very good mileage,  about 22 to the gallon in the mountains.  There wasn't any room for groceries, and the back seat was a joke. Still, I had a great time with it.   My wife did not have a great time with it.  She said she could punch her finger through the thin material of the door ( she couldn't but I can see what she meant), and the roof was a rag top, which she didn't like much.  She didn't like the manual transmission.

Then my kids came home from Canada.  At the time we had the truck,  a 1999 Cherokee Sport, a 2002 Liberty, and my Jeep.   The kids didn't have a car in Canada because they didn't need one in Vancouver. You could ride the ferry, the sky rail, or the bus where ever you had to go.  My son took the Liberty, but we didn't really have a match for my daughter. The 1999 Cherokee was long in the tooth.

It was decided we needed a new vehicle for my daughter. Something big and safe.  My wife felt the "toy" car had to go, and I could think of no reasonable defense.  We went to our Jeep dealer.  We buy all of our vehicles from her and the sight of one of our Jeeps pulling into the dealership gladdens her heart mightily.

She had just the thing.  A nice  Jeep Commander with under 20,000 miles. The miles per gallon was not good, and the Jeep Commander was being discontinued, but it fit the bill and we got a good deal on it. We traded in my Wrangler. It looked brand new, and had all the maintenance paperwork. Somebody got a good vehicle when they bought that Wrangler used.

To date the biggest maintenance costs on the Commander have been tires. A set of four tires runs about $650.00.  It did have a problem with some kind of transmission regulation device but the dealership fixed that for $125.00.

Today my daughter called and said the battery was dead.  I told her to call her brother at work, have him come pick her up when he gets off, take the old battery to Walmart, trade it in on a new one to avoid getting ripped off for the "core " exchange fee, and she should be good to go.  This is the first time she's had a dead battery.  You only learn this stuff by taking care of it when it happens to you. Taking the battery out and hooking it up correctly is not hard. 

Vehicles are a constant pain.

10 comments:

  1. Tell me about it. I have a leak coming from a stopped up heater box, and the only way they can get to it is to remove the entire dashboard. Which is going to take all day. So labor would be around $800. I have been to 3 different places for estimates. I wouldn't care so much except it's getting worse and I don't want it to start molding in my car, particularly since one of the boys has asthma. Sigh.

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    1. I wonder if there is really such a thing as affordable car repair. I've spent a lot of money on the truck and the Cherokee in the last year, but the cost of replacing either of them would be much more. It's a "damned if you do, damned if you don't" situation. I hope you can find some place that will do it for less, the labor costs seem really high.

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    2. Lisa you can have someone bypass the heater core under the hood.It will stop the leaking but you wont have any heat.

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  2. Agreed. Cars are like women, you can't live with them and can't live without. big grin.

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    Replies
    1. with some women.... you:

      a)can't live with them

      b)refer to a

      heh

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  3. Cars are cheaper to maintain though.

    I just read Gary's blog and his truck battery has crapped out. Must be some kind of vehicular epidemic going on.

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  4. I haven't bought a new one since 97, I think. I don't ever plan on buy a new one again. what is it 20-25% depreciation the first time you drive it off the lot? and 40 to 60% after the first two year? That's crazy.

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    Replies
    1. I know. But with a Wrangler, you never know who had it before you. Some old guy who took care of it, or somebody with a teenage kid who beat hell out of the thing and that's why they traded it in. All things considered though, next time I'll buy a used one, preferably one that was traded in by someone my dealer knew. If it has Florida tags that would be best, because those come in virtually mint. If it has Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, or Alabama tags I'm not touching it. Those vehicles see some hard use.

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    2. oh I bought my truck almost two years old, because it only had 5500 miles. After I priced the three yer old models and the 2 yr old versus the mileage the one I wanted, I did bite the bullet and pay just a little more than I wanted. but I paid it off in 8 months so I saved from having to pay most of the interest.

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    3. As long as you got what you wanted. That's the big thing.

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