“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Is this the gun you saw at your father in laws?


If this is the one, it's a replica.   Built by Navy Arms, at the behest of Val Fogget, back in the mid nineties. Sweet gun.  I use one as a truck gun. Lots of recoil but not as bad as the British Enfield V.  12 round magazine, but as with all magazines, it's not a good idea to fully load it. I put ten rounds in there.

12 comments:

  1. Yep it looked just like that and was chambered in 30-06. I originally thought it was a jungle enfield but the 30-06 caliber always confused me.

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  2. He also had one like that which was more beat up but chambered in .303 brit. I am assuming that was the real deal then.

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    1. Yeah, that would have been a real Enfield V. They bring pretty good money even in "good" condition if you can find somebody who has one who wants to sell it. Those kick really hard, the .303 is a lot of cartridge for that little bitty frame on the gun.

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  3. Are yo usure it was 30-06? These are in .308.

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  4. That is a very cool old rifle. For reasons I am not entirely clear on my rifle "truck gun" choice has frequently been a 30-30 winchester. Right under the cost bar of 'might cry if it was stolen' but very servicable all the same. Would say my choice wins in terms of short term rate of fire but loses at reload time (assuming a spare mag or stripper clips) and long distance.

    Given that the cheap ammo is gone I am not going to add .303 as a caliber. Do plan to purchase a .308 in the near future though, probably a Savage 10/11 unless I get flush then it will be an AR-10. A .308 Enfield as a deer/ camp/ truck gun would be a good option to have the nostalgia AND still be within a common caliber. If it's meant to be I will find one.

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    1. Nothing wrong with a thirty thirty. They have been around a long time. These Val Fogget Jungle Carbines were only made by Navy Arms for about a year and in very limited numbers. They do turn up on the online gun auctions and at gunshows.

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    2. Love me some Cowboy Assault Weapon (30-30). Maybe I will find an Enfield .308 like that one, or an Ishi some day.

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  5. That is a cool rifle. The removable box magazine especially, a great way to have an unloaded rifle but have it very quickly brought into action.

    I remember many years ago, I think Navy Arms also imported a Siamese bolt Mauser was reconfigured to shoot 45/70 Govt. I think the magazine held 2 -3 cartridges. Anyway, I regret not picking one up when I had a chance at a gun show back, then, the 45/70 was not on my 'gotta have' lists.

    Theother Ryan - while looking around for this, you also might look for the FR8 Mauser rifle, a strange Spanish Army 'Trainer' for transitioning from their Mauser 98 bolt guns to CETME semi-autos. They are 7.62 NATO chambered guns as well - nifty guns.

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    1. The concern with a NATO 7.62 weapon is that someone puts in the slightly higher powered U.S. 308 round and bad things happen.

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    2. Russell, there are some slight differences between 7.62X51 and .308, mainly in the thickness of the case, but I"ve been firing both out of all kinds of rifles for decades without ill results. I know what you are talking about, and huge arguments wax eloquent on the gun pages about this and the .223 issue, but to me they have always seemed like "how many angels can dance on the head of a pin." Of course, I could blow my face off tomorrow and that would obviate the strength of my argument. ;-)

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    3. I've also read that about the FR-8 - (NATO okay - .308 Winchester not). I've never seen any issues in mine, probably fired half a case before I even read a report saying don't. The FR-7 is built on another action and THAT one I can see the possible issues with it. Dunno.

      Our deer and hogs are small so heavy bullets are not shot here.

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  6. The FR8 is built on a Spanish Mauser action. Many of those were converted to .308 and sold in this country. Most of the mauser books say the action of the original Mauser was not really a good match for .308, but I have never heard of an incident with one of them breaching or having a gas blowback. I tend to be leery of things like "Ishapores will blow up" because when you research it, there's no specific incident when it happened. It's always third or fourth hand so to speak.

    It's important when you think of Spanish .308 to remember that they loaded a special low power .308 round for us in the Cetme, and it generated much lower chamber pressure than a standard .308. Then, when they made the decision to use standard NATO ball, the Cetme made the changeover with no problem but I'm not sure about guns like the FR7 and 8. They were made when low powered .308 was the norm in Spain.

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