“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Friday, December 6, 2013

They do things differently up there.

Glenn is in his hotel.  But the story of how he got there is strange , at least from my perspective.

He told me that just as the wrecker showed up, a police car pulled up as well.  Several police officers had stopped to see if he was ok and needed help so Glenn was not unduly concerned. This policeman watched the wrecker pull the Liberty out onto the road, then told Glenn that he did not need a wrecker to get to the hotel and other people needed it more.

The policeman said he would follow Glenn to the hotel.  The trip there was slip, slide all the way. When they got to the parking lot, the guy got out of his patrol car and looked at the tires on the Liberty. He said they were bald and that's why Glenn was having trouble.

Now, if you have been reading this blog for awhile, you will remember I just put brand new tires on that car this past summer, and had the vehicle front end balanced and aligned. You can't get the tires this 2002 Liberty uses off the rack, they have to be special ordered. I bought the best, and my son has only driven that car around town. So I don't think the tires are bald although I will check.  As an aside, I never heard of a law enforcement person making decisions about someone needing the wrecker you ordered and had been waiting for over the past four hours.  It must be normal though because the wrecker driver just said ok and sailed off. Of course, he will get paid anyway, and now he could get on to his next job quicker, but the whole issue seems bizarre to me. I just have to assume that up in the North, where they have to deal with ice storms more frequently, the police simply assert their authority to a greater extent than they do here in similar matters.

I'm just glad he's off the road and inside somewhere warm.  Once the bridges over the Ohio River were closed, it was a cinch he wasn't getting back to his apartment and it won't hurt him to stay in a hotel for a night.  Surely the roads will be cleared by tomorrow.

He seems to have had everything he needed except a phone charger, and that's easy to take care of.  As suggested by a comment on the preceeding post, some crossword puzzle books might not come amiss in that kind of situation either.  I plan on adding a couple of those small strobe lights that have magnetic bases for attaching to a car, just as a little added security.

I should also mention that my son said several people stopped and offered to help him aside from the police.  That was kind of them, in my experience a snow and ice situation fosters an "every man for himself" kind of attitude but I guess not everybody reacts that way.

18 comments:

  1. Interesting. My neighbor runs a wrecker service as a side business to his farm I will have to ask him about cops ordering them around. I know he has at least six trucks for his various employees scattered about and I seem to remember him once mentioning that they could in fact be pressed into service during a state of emergency somehow. I also know it is not uncommon for the wreckers to end up needing to be rescued when it gets bad.

    My guess on the tires is they look bald from an angle. I have seen several brands like that until you get up on them and see how deep the treads really are.

    Glad to hear you got the offspring Heir apparent safely tucked away safe. I am sure you are breathing easier now.

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    1. I would be interested in hearing what your friend has to say. The thing that startles me, is that I called the wrecker, I told it what to do, I paid for it, but the policeman contravened that and sent it on it's way. I've never known law enforcement to interfer in private business between citizens. But, as you say, maybe they have that right in the Northern states where snow emergencies are more common. I don't object to the way it worked out in this case, but I am not sure what I think of the concept in principle.

      Those tires had better not be bald in that short a time. They are the best that could be had and we've taken care of them. No doubt you are right, the bad light and the wet tires may have given that impression.

      It was a real FlailEx. I knew he was going to have trouble even before he got off work by looking at the local weather there on line. But I couldn't raise him on the cell phone because he is required to put his phone on silent at work. By the time I did get him, he was at a gas station and the bridges were closing. He does not know how to drive in snow or ice, most people from here don't.

      His sister was going to launch out in the Commander and get him, but it was getting dark, snow was coming down heavily, the icing was worse and then the radio announcement about the bridges put paid to that idea.

      Getting a decent hotel room and laying low until the roads clear tomorrow seemed the best bet.

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    2. AAA has films about how to drive in winter. i think they have classes on the subject in some locations. check it out.i'm from the ohio valley and you are looking at a lot of moisture. in summer you cannot breathe.

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    3. It couldn't hurt. I know most of the doctrine, I think my son and I could both use lessons in the practical aspects. Driving on ice is something we both need to avoid but he won't be able to all the time.

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  2. oh Harry - i am so happy to hear that he is safe and sound. i can't speak about what goes on there - but generally, here in Framboise, our cops will try and offer some good advice about tire treads and whatnot - all in the name of helping the citizen - our cops here really do care. i can't say the same about the cops back in the city! and i will just add that in the 5 mins that we took to read the preceding post to this post, we prayed that Glenn was safe! and thanked The Lord when we read this post!

    there are still good people in the world, Harry, it's hard for some of us to believe, based on our experiences...but one of the things that i have learned since moving to the Manor - is that - there are still some people who really, truly care! i am glad that your son met up with a few tonight! i am so glad to hear that he is safe!

    sending all of our best wishes, always, your friend,
    kymber and jambaloney

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    1. Hey, K and J,
      Thanks for the kind thoughts. We were jumping through hoops there for awhile. I didn't want a wreck and I was pretty sure that was going to happen, but it all ended happily.
      I was surprised people stopped to help, because even I know that in ice, if you stop on a hill, you may not get going again. Maybe they are not as panicky there because they are used to it.

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  3. I'm just glad he's in a warm room behind a locked door for the night.

    As for the po-po, I gave up trying to figure them out a good while back. As long as they aren't being mean to us, I think we should just call it good and be grateful.

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    1. Yeah, it's a huge relief. My big fear was somebody skidding and slamming into him by the road. I don't know what the deal was with that policeman. He was not unkind, and he did drive behind Glenn all the way to the hotel. Like you say, I will just put it in the back of my mind as something that happened, not necessarily as a bad thing, just something I have not experienced before. My son thought it was very strange as well but he said the wrecker driver did not seem at all taken aback.

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  4. Glad Glenn is safe and sound for the evening. Can't blame him for not being able to drive in snow or ice; he's just not used to it. If he stays up there in a few years he will be able to do fine.

    Come to think of it I do not keep a cell phone charger in my vehicle. Then again I hate the damn thing and subconsciously don't really want it to work anyway.

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    1. I drive long distances between towns here on occasion. I always take the back way if there is one. I worry about breaking down out in the boondocks with no phone. No one will stop any more to see if you want help. Everyone used to but now it's just too dangerous. A cellphone is one modern device I really like to have. I never use it when others would have to listen to it though. I also like to feel that my family members can communicate to address issues that blow up in our faces like tonight.

      We mostly fort up here in snow and never venture into ice. I suspect that if he continues to live in the North he will acquire skills like driving in snow, as you say.

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    2. Redmond Lewis, I'm stuck having a cell phone for work. It's an electronic leash. You make an interesting point about people not stopping for others due to crime, etc. Personally I stop when people who don't look like tweekers if they are broken down in bad weather or out in the sticks.

      Do however conceed they are useful at times. If I had my druthers I'd probably keep a pre paid phone charged with minutes and powered off in the glove box just in case.

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    3. Redmond Lewis is the persona I use over on my brothers retricted access blog. I must have been there, come back here and not switched accounts. Sorry about that.

      I still picked up people who look harmless, like women and old people, if they are in distress. Ten years ago i would have stopped for anyone.

      If I had a job I would be concerned about being tied to it by the cell phone but happily those days are behind me.

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  5. Thank goodness everything worked out in the end. I hope it didn't shake him up too much
    I hate being attached to a cell phone but I do make sure I have one with me when I am driving around here, as well as an in car charger. In such a rural area I could wait for hours for any help if I had an accident.
    Looks like you have your family well trained to call dad's mission control centre when a crisis arises, it must be reassuring for them to know you are there :)

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    1. Dreamer, he had a good nights rest, and the roads had been salted and graveled by the time he left the hotel this morning. There are four of us in the immediate family, and we all tend to depend on one another for different aspects of our lives. I have always been the planner and coordinator, but I notice that my daughter is taking over more of that these days, which is ok with me. I am the easiest to contact when things go sour because I am the only one of us that doesn't work. So, I get the call and then I start tracking down the "action person" who will have to fix the problem. Yesterday it was my daughter because she knows that city and I don't.

      Glenn has asthma and carries one of those inhaler things. About a year ago he had a severe attack at work and had left his inhaler at home. His sister had to rush there and haul him to the pharmacy while I called my wife, who got her sister to call in a prescription for a new inhaler to the pharmacy. We have it down pretty good.

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    1. So am I. I figured the least we would get out of this was that somebody would hit the Liberty by sliding into it. But we escaped unscathed.

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  7. I'm glad he's safe. I hate ice. I won't drive on it. We're in danger of the snow/ice melting today and refreezing overnight and then more Sunday night. Maybe not going in to work on Monday. Even if town streets are OK we end up sliding down the hill- like we did today and we were even in 4 low. Glad nothing was coming!

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    1. The weather forecast for Cincinnati was completely wrong and that's how we got caught. He does ok in snow but the ice was too much. My daughter said when they closed the bridges over the Ohio river people got out of their cars and just walked on across to get home. I wonder how they moved around once across. Personally when things get that bad I think it's time to find somewhere to land and wait it out. I'm glad you didn't slide on down and crash into a tree or another vehicle! 4 wheel drive is wonderful in snow but on ice it hasn't ever done me much good. Your policy of not driving on ice if avoidable is the best.

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