“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Thursday, January 16, 2014

New Magazines on the stand today.

I took a drive today, just for something to do.  I've lived here a long time, nearly 30 years, but there are still back roads and some old forest service roads I haven't been on.  I passed a frozen pond and there was a herd of deer clustered around it, probably about sixteen or so of them. I doubt they were at the pond for water, since a huge creek runs by that meadow. Maybe they were just enjoying the sunshine.

I ended up in town, and stopped by the grocery store.  The new magazine that replaced "Surplus Guns" was
out on the magazine racks.  It's at least as good as the old magazine, and possibly better.  There were articles on reloading for the older guns, coverage of some surplus rifles that aren't very well known anymore,  and an article on surplus military equipment.


I also found the second issue of  "Off Grid" magazine.  Although it's almost ten dollars, it's actually a pretty good read.  Do you remember the song Tavia sang in "Fiddler on the Roof."   

Lord who created the Lion and the Lamb,
You decreed I should be what I am.
But would it spoil some vast , eternal plan,
if I were a wealthy man?


When you read "Off Grid" you feel that way.  The equipment they review is superb, and would be wonderful to have.  The articles on vehicles, weapons and ancillary equipment are interesting.  It's just that a normal family in these times can't afford any of it.  They had a really good article on building a bug out vehicle in this issue, something I would absolutely love to have, but it wasn't something anyone I know (except maybe my middle brother) could actually afford.  I don't mind though, I am getting a lot of entertainment out of reading the magazine even if I can't buy the things in it.



Well, time to go put the beef broth on to boil.  When winter is here I mix it with the dog food to make it more nutritious.  If I have any bacon fat or anything of that nature, I mix that in too.  Dogs do not live by dog food alone.

12 comments:

  1. I been tellign the wife that the outside dog gets all the good scraps because he needs more than just dog food. She seems to think dogs should not get scraps or big juicy ham bones, stuff like that. Luckily I do most of the kitchen cleaning and the dog don't tell on me :)

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    1. One of the things I am proud of up here is that nothing goes to waste. Between the dogs, cats, and chickens everything gets eaten. The ferrets can't eat scraps but everybody else is glad to get them. I know the dogs need extra items in their diet , especially in winter. When we go to town, I buy them hog jowls, or bacon trimmings, or soup bones. None of those things cost more than a couple of dollars and the additional food is good for them. I know lots of people think feeding their dogs scraps is bad. My brother Robert would never give his Spaniels scraps. But then, he buys imported "dog jerky treats" for them and my hounds don't have access to such delicacies. ;-)

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  2. my father used to feed the dog (he had for his job in the Army) with raw eggs in the mornings. She was a beast of a sniffer dog. if she came in the house, she would claim my fathers chair and would not get out for anyone but my Father. funny dog! lol

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    1. Dogs like eggs. In fact, if your dog goes to other peoples homes and steals their chicken eggs, he's an "egg sucker" and it's very dangerous because some people will shoot them. Fortunately, mine don't have to go elsewhere because they eat the chicken eggs they root out of the hidden nests. Since that keeps down the chicken population (I already have about fifty), I don't begrudge them the eggs. There are still enough left over for my needs.
      Sounds like your dad's dog led a good life.

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  3. I haven't randomly driven down backroads in years. I used to do that, pre-kids, to take pictures.
    My dog loves if I make a chicken in the crockpot, because he always gets the broth on his food. He'll eat until his sides are bulging :-)

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    1. my wife and I used to go on long drives in the mountains. But when she started teaching special ed, she was always so tired when she came home for the weekend that we don't much do that anymore. She comes home with bites and big scratches on her, because she has the severely retarded children these days.
      I still go out and just drive the old forest service roads and back roads. I used to hike the mountains with my son but I don't go out in the woods too far alone so these days I mostly drive.

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    2. question for your wife. are there more 'special needs' kids now, per- centage- -wise than you have found in the past? there are so many drunken and drug using people it seems it would have terrible, irreversible effects upon the offspring.
      thanks.
      deb h.

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    3. I asked her about that, and she says as far as these mountains go, she doesn't think there has been an increase in the last ten years or so. Most of the children she gets have specific medical disorders that aren't related to misconduct on the mothers part. That doesn't mean it doesn't happen, it just isn't as common here as it is in urban or suburban areas.

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  4. Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    I like backroads and exploring. Theres a really good one going from Big Bend National Park to Terlingua Ranch in West Texas.

    On the survival mag.

    Too many gizmo's will lead to failure. I don't use GPS, I use a compass and regular maps.
    I take issue with high tech, high dollar survival stuff and equipment. Any equipment should be simple and stupid, like an AK-47. Everyone forgets about how hard it is to do things when your exhausted, shaking, cold and half starved. Simple tasks become monumental undertakings.
    The writers of that mag forget about things like that. They just pander to the gizmo market.
    On the bug out vehicle, one of the best ones is an old VW bug with all original equipment and spare tires. They are small, light weight, hard to get stuck. Easy to fix, air cooled and almost float on water. I like the older Toyota trucks myself. I can carry equipment, food or get a class 3 license and mount an old Soviet 12.3 mm machine gun in the back and have a "Somali Technical" special (that can make feral hog hunting in Texas real interesting)

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    1. I think that old Soviet heavy machine gun was a 12.7 mm and not a 12.3 mm. They are legendary like our .50 Ma Duece and all over Africa and in every third world dump. Get a 12.7 mm and you can be the local General of your neighborhood, mount one on a small boat or fishing skiff and you can be the local Admiral of the sea's. Every warlord's gotta have one.

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    2. Harry'

      (captaincrunch)

      that was me above, forgot to leave my handle.

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    3. Well, like the Russians say " the best is the enemy of good enough." I agree that you can get caught up in the glamour of a piece of equipment and not teach yourself how to use it. A lot of this gear would work, though. For instance, a roll out solar panel for recharging your cell phone could come in handy if you got stranded in the snow. If my budget allowed, which it doesn't, I would like to add some of this equipment to my gear. Reading about it is fun, though. As for the bug out vehicle, these they build and write about are the equivalent of military vehicles, built for the long haul and with everything your heart could desire aboard..The problem is, who has $100,000 to spend on a bug out vehicle? Precious few, which is why they are custom made to the buyers specifications.

      I know the gun. If it's the same one we are both thinking of, it's the Degtyaryova-Shpagina Krupnokaliberny . A very good, if heavy, machine gun but it might be a bit hard to find one for your VW. Your good with tools so I am sure you could improvise a mount for it, it's just the gun is so rare in the states.

      Good thoughts, though. I am only now starting to give consideration to a bugging out strategy, and mine will just be to go deeper into the woods if it ever comes to it.

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