“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Catching my breath

Ragnar/ Jiggles today. 
Ragnar/ Jiggles  the day before his surgery.


When the kids were here, they called him "Jiggles." But I didn't think that was very dignified for a big male ferret, so I renamed him "Ragnar."  I find though, that in times of stress I think of him as Jiggles.  

It's Saturday morning and I'm drinking my coffee by the fire.  Strange though it may be, I do have a fire burning in the fireplace this close to May.  We had a big rainstorm last night, about 12 hours worth of constant downpour, heavy at times. It brought cold air with it.   I went out this morning to turn off some security lights in the outbuildings and realized I would't be spending much time outside today in this chilly weather.

Yesterday was a long one.  Jiggles and I had to be at the animal hospital by 0845, so we left the house very early.  His operation took much longer than the doctor had anticipated, but the tumor was removed. I won't know til the biopsy comes back from the University of Georgia at Athens whether this is the end of that issue, or it was malignant.

Jiggles was really "cut about."  He has a three inch incision sewed up on his neck, and the stitches have to come out ten days from yesterday.  If you are less than a foot long not counting your tail, this is a pretty big cut.  They gave him a shot for pain that will last 24 hours from noon, yesterday. Not surprisingly, he has been asleep since then, just getting up to eat and drink a little and visit his restroom box.

So today we are all taking it easy here at Festung Mountain.  I have some book keeping to do, and I plan to do some napping myself. Too much going on the last couple of days.


The new Survivalist magazine was in the mailbox when we got back from the Animal Hospital.  I read it last night.  It's strange how so many of the magazines of this genre are now primarily about growing food, raising animals, homesteading, and essentially domestic issues.  Remembering the old American Survival Guide, back in the 90's, the bulk of the articles were about guns, camping, and living in the woods.

As the self sufficiency movement has gone more "main stream" over the years, I suppose this was inevitable. There are more families involved, and more urban and suburban people.  Many of the articles are written by women and I don't think that was the case back in the 1980's -1990's.  I think overall this is probably a positive trend, even if the magazines aren't as interesting. This issue of Survivalist was full of good information but it was a boring read.

16 comments:

  1. Hope the biopsy results are negative. Not easy when an animal has had an op - all they want to do is scratch it with germ infected claws. Perhaps a treat, or two, or three, will distract Jiggles? :)

    Look like a good magazine. We get nothing like that here... ;(

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  2. Dani, he was just out eating and his neck looks ok for now. I will keep a sharp eye on him.

    There used to be only one real survivalist magazine here, it's called "The Old American Survival Guide" because there's a new one out now with the same name. But now there are about six good ones, and they all feature homestead based living as a mainstay of the publications. What you and your husband do there in South Africa is what we call homesteading. More and more people here are getting out of the cities and suburbia and giving it a go.

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  3. Glad to hear the surgery went well. Hope the test results are good ones. Poor little one. They sometimes don't understand that we are trying to help them.
    I have noticed the same trend in the blogs I read and the videos I watch. I wonder if the reality that most folks would never survive living in the woods is a reason. I sometimes think that most of the city folks I see out and about would never make it if we just lost the grid for a long period of time. They would be lost without their electronics, grocery stores, etc.

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    1. Yesterday, sitting in the waiting room at the animal hospital, I got to talking with this guy who had just moved up here a few months ago. He was from San Bernadino, California. He was an old hippie. Tie dyed tea shirt, long pony tail, and sandals. A very incongruous sight here in the North Georgia mountains. Nice enough fellow. He and his wife had moved here because he couldn't stand it in California anymore, and the found the people here to be friendly, the mountains beautiful. He was enthralled by what he called "Southern Hospitality." He said he'd heard of it all his life but never believed it until he came here. I think he just interpreted the absence of aggressive behavior here compared to where he came from as hospitality.

      He had bought himself a place up on a mountain top. He had no generator, no water stored, no food stored, and had never given it a thought. He said he could get by "if the power goes out for an hour or two." I told him the power could go out for a week or two here, but he didn't believe me. I think he thought I was playing fast and loose with the truth because he was new here. His mind set was that as long as he could get to town, he would be fine no matter what happened. I guess there are a lot of people out there like that. He also thought that now he was out of California, where earthquakes and riots are an ever present danger, nothing could happen to him up here in the Blue Ridge. Tried to talk to him about it but didn't make a dent in his preconceptions about the bucolic life in the countryside. He not only wasn't concerned about any kind of Black Swan event, the possibility of something like that was totally outside his frame of reference.

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  4. That is a big cut for a little guy. I guess mainstream vets don't really do things laproscopically. I hope the biopsy results bring good news.

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  5. The thing on his neck was the size of a quarter. It was all swollen up. I know he will feel better once he heals up. We will just have to wait and see what happens from here.

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  6. thanks for ragnar update. praying for him.
    deb harvey

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  7. I think he feels better than he looks right now.

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  8. Poor thing, I hope he recovers quickly.

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    1. It really is tough on him. He's older and I'm sure this is going to be hard for him to recover from. But it had to be taken care of, it was only getting worse.

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  9. I hope the tumor is nothing to worry about. More times than not they are nothing to worry about. It's best to be on the safe side. I bet he's in some pain from being cut on.

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    1. Alisa, at least we have one thing going for us. This is the only doctor in North Georgia who knows ferrets really well. He has treated many, and he is affiliated with a vet in Florida where there are great numbers of ferrets so they are not exotic there. The tumor was getting worse, and bleeding, so we had to take some action. With any luck at all, he will get well and that will be the end of it.

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  10. Harry - i am so happy for an update on little Ragnar...he's gonna be hurting for a bit but i am sure that he will pull through. and even though i love the name Jingles...i think Ragnar is a much more an appropriate name for that big guy (even though i always call him little!).

    Harry - one of the best things that ever happened to us when we seriously considered homesteading and moving here was to find the American Preppers Network and then get involved with the Canadian Preppers Network. we were involved in both while we lived in the city and learned about a lot of stuff that would have totally freaked us out once we got here. but the second best thing that happened to us, was that jam's mom and stepdad gave us 10 yrs worth of issues of a canadian magazine called "harrowsmith". it was written and edited by, and for, the back to the landers in the 70's and 80's. we read those magazines from front to back several times before moving to the Manor. and once we got here, in december2010, one of the worst winters here ever, with freezing pipes, boiling snow for water, and everything that could go wrong and did go wrong....we spent that winter re-reading those magazines and learning everything that we could while we were right in the middle of it. those magazines saved our sanity and taught us so much about what we were in the middle of.

    i read lots of prepping and survivalists blogs....and i learn much with every read. but mostly i relearn what i already read in those magazines. they have been a godsend to us.

    lastly, the other reading material that we rely heavily on is a full set of Popular Mechanics Do-It-Yourself encyclopedias which were printed in 1955. before any electronic machinations of things. those books are worth their weight in gold times 2!!! we love re-reading them and our harrowsmith magazines.

    sorry for the long ramble. i just wanted to tell you that prepping and survivalism has changed and i am glad that it is going mainstream. but i am not interested in any $5 magazine that is going to tell me how to grow a tomatoe in a pot. just not interested. ya know what i mean?

    much love to you and yours. and kiss that little Ragnar for me a few times and give him some special cuddles. as always, your friend,
    kymber

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    1. Kymber, we have been at this a long time. In my case I sometimes feel like there aren't any topics left in the survivalist genre that haven't been just beaten to death. Even with my blog I often have trouble coming up with new things to write about. You and J don't because you lead very active lives and are social beings. I really need to get out off the mountain more and I need to start taking pictures again so I can offer more interesting posts.

      Ragnar says his new name is Frankenferret. He is not his normal self yet.

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  11. Just catching up Harry, poor Ragnar looks like he has had a real tough time. I hope he heals quickly and cleanly and soon feels more like his usual self. That's a big cut for such a small animal.

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    1. He is not acting like he feels very well. He got a newspaper and made a very careful nest out of strips of it, in a circle. Now he won't come out from under the china cabinet where he built the nest. I put food and water under there. I pulled him out to look at his neck but there's no redness or swelling. I don't know if this is good or bad. The vet is in Florida and won't be back til thursday....

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