“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Saturday, June 7, 2014

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.

  It's nice out today.   I've spent a lot of time on the porch, reading.  There's a nice breeze blowing and it isn't too humid.  Still running the air conditioning and dehumidifiers, but it's possible to be outside without wilting.

I got the digital version of this book.  It was recommended to me and it only cost about $4.00.

It's pretty well written, and the story line is good.  However, it's not a "book."  Weber has followed what has become the normal protocol for web book authors. You write what amounts to two or three chapters of a "real" book, put a cover on it, and sell it as a complete novel. But of course, it isn't.  The idea is to sell the first book in a series pretty cheaply, then keep these little mini books coming. If they sell well, you boost the price on following books in the series.

I knew I was in trouble when my Kindle told me it would take 15 minutes to read.   I guess you can't blame Weber and others for adapting to a new medium for their work.

So, it's a good book, interesting and well written.  It's too short.  It's not available in paper. I think I am going to start waiting til these books come out in paperback, and get all the little segments at once. This is too much like the old serial stories in men's magazines from the 1930's.


I have noticed quite an uptick in the number of kids getting hurt in young families.  I am not sure why this is, unless the winter wore on the kids like it did the adults, and now the children are out there playing hard. So far, all the injured are small boys, a breed given to misadventure and mishap at the best of times. None of these accidents were preventable. Sometimes things just happen.  Fortunately , though some have been serious none of the kids have been in life threatening situations.  All I can do is feel for the parents, because the trials are just beginning.  My son was about 12, I think, when he got his first dirt bike. I remember the disharmony that caused. My wife was dead set against it.  I felt like he was old enough and I didn't want to raise a wimp.  The first day we went out to the off road trails, he was really resplendent in all his new equipment and with his new bike. Like a medieval knight.  I was really proud of him.  Of course, our first trip to the off road trails led to the emergency room after he missed a turn and crashed into a metal and telephone pole barrier. I did not particularly relish calling his mother from the hospital with the news. Still, it was a good sport, he had a lot of fun, and he rode until he went off to Canada to go to school.  Young men don't become good fathers and husbands by staying in the house and playing the violin.


10 comments:

  1. Oh I bet you got the old "I told ya so" speech after the dirt bike incident...

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  2. Once she realized he wasn't seriously injured, she was ok. My wife's father was a Texan and her mom is from Mississippi. With those genes she's pretty tough.

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  3. Today it was hot, over 90, here but maybe slightly less humid than it has been. Walker and I are 'camping' in the backyard after doing hotdogs and smores outside over a fire. He had a great time.

    Kids are so funny when it comes to risk. My daughter will jump up and down right beside an edge when she is 5 feet in the air without a second thought but takes 5 minutes to carefully go over the little step coming through a door.

    Walker is fearless about things I wish made him think like a parking lot full of traffic, sharp tools, etc and deeply worried about stuff that is just fine, like Mom driving 35mph down the road, small lizards, etc.

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    1. It's a matter of perception I guess. The only real way to develop a sense of risk evaluation is cumulative experience. I recall that most of my knowledge of such matters was acquired the hard way. I am glad you are not camping in my area tonight. Very hot and humid with intermittent rain showers, thunderstorms. Lots of lightning.

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  4. I just gave my 10 year old my old pickup to drive around our 120 acre timber his mother is ok with it. His grandma not so much!

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    1. As long as there are no stumps or ditches he should be fine. A fellow has to learn to operate a vehicle sometime and that sounds safer than a mall parking lot or some such place.

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  5. Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Just finished reading the latest "Dune" book, called Mentats of Dune.

    I started another book today also.

    I'm in my forties and I still go out and screw things up with the surfing, and everything else I get into.
    I really love the adrenaline rush of danger.

    I'm a bit more careful and I plan things out and I no longer act recklessly. I calculate the risk before I do something dangerous.

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    1. I read the first Dune book ages ago. Saw the movie, it wasn't bad.
      I don't take risks just for the hell of it anymore. Takes too long to recover when something goes sour.

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  6. Only way for kids to learn anything was through their mistakes. Everyone was allowed to make mistakes back then - and no-one was expected to be perfect immediately LOL

    Times have changed...

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    1. Times have certainly changed, and not for the better I'm afraid. I'm glad I was a kid in the 1950's. I doubt I could survive as one today. It's hard enough getting by as an adult.

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