“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Sunday, June 29, 2014

To do list.


  • Answer all email by Monday night ATL.
  • Take the truck into town and get a little more lumber, a few more bags of planting soil, and try to get the new test garden finished.
  • Order a full case of ferret protein paste and another of ferret supplement oil.
  • Get off of top dead center and contact the local Ham radio club about their next meeting for tyros.
  • Go ahead and pre order Rawle's two new books due out in October. He isn't doing book bomb anymore so it doesn't matter when I order.
  • Go through the spreadsheets on powder and bullets, and see what I need to order to keep a good stocking level up for all my common chamberings.  Talk to Pioneer Preppy about loading cast lead bullets and see what I can learn about that for the .45 Colt guns.
  • Buy two more fifty pound sacks of dog food, 4 more 22 pound sacks of cat food, some cases of canned cat food, and at least six months of ferret food. The other animals can eat improvised food, the ferrets can't.  Another 200 pounds of cracked corn or scratch, whichever I can get.
  • Try to find a pole antenna to replace the old on one the SSB CB. If I can't find one, rig a dipole.
  • Find a new headset for the old SSB CB. Or at least an adaptor which will work with a more modern headset.
  • Order six of the new LED no wire motion sensor lights from Sportsman's Guide.
  • Get more window film to cut down on heat coming into big living room windows. Get some heavy plywood and precut it for shutters on all the ground floor windows.
  • Call the woodman and start picking up a load a week if he has it.
  • Find somewhere to get the chainsaws overhauled.
  • Find a good place in the city to have Glenn's car engine rebuilt.
  • Find mirror set for his new car to replace the old ones. Try Whitney catalog.
  • Pick up another four hundred rounds of 9mm (Tula in the can) and another 100 rounds of .45 ACP.  If .38 special or .357 show up at Walmart, buy some.
  • Fill all five kerosene jugs while the summer prices are in effect.
  • Talk to gas company about summer fill up schedule
  • Start keeping the truck tanks, main and saddle, full to the max. Fill the two truck Jerry cans and keep them on the truck.
  • Keep the Jeep at a minimum of half full.
  • Put one scanner, one HF receiver, four "sports radios" in the ferrady cage.
  • Restock the battery supply, especially AA, AAA and D.
  • Replace the 20 pounds of rice you used to make a ferret dig box.
  • Fill all the large plastic jars with rice or beans. No exceptions.
  • Go to the flea markets in North Carolina and over near the South Carolina border, look for things on the "pick up" list.  Make an overnight trip out of South Carolina.
  • Decide whether or not to buy more 7.62X54. 


That should keep me busy for a while.  Being retired is good in one respect, it does let you spend your time working on things you need to do for yourself, and not grubbing away at some job to make money for someone who already has too much of it.

I have run down my stored stocks of animal feed in the last three months, intentionally. I want all new, fresh supplies stored by the end of July.  I have other projects, but I am going to try to make a dint in this list before I start working on the other "big" jobs.

40 comments:

  1. Hey Harry,


    (captaincrunch)


    I wish I was your neighbor. I would not have to worry about your level or preparedness.

    I got one of them Beofeng UV5R radio's last week. I am working on getting the freak's programed via computer. I have a few friends that have the same radio and they like it.
    Like you Harry, I have a ton of stuff to do.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It seems to me that I just don't have the energy I used to. I would never have had so many things pile up like this even ten years ago.

    Let me know how the radio works out. I can give you some miltary freqs where the transmissions are in the clear if you like.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have two of those radios, one of which was put in a metal can for the same readon you mentioned above in your post. My scanner along with several other radios also went into the can.

      I bought some after market antennas for the ham radios. They are good rigs for the money.

      Delete
    2. one of the things on my "pick up" list is a decent Ham transceiver if I can find one. Then, even if I don't have a license, I can use it if I have to. I know the bands where the Hams operate, and in a real crisis I don't think a license is going to be a big issue. I'd still like to get one so I could become a member of a net. I hear people with their own nets going a lot of the time, especially nights when propagation is good.

      Delete
    3. Now these that CC and I are using are for local areas only, not for distance.

      Delete
    4. I've got a bunch of those little hand helds that are called "sports radios", but in the mountains the range is very limited. They are advertised as having a 30 mile range on flat terrain but I doubt it very much.

      Delete
  3. You go, Harry, go!! See you're getting yourself into gear - love your chore list :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Dani, so much to do, so little energy! I need to get the show on the road with all this stuff.

    ReplyDelete
  5. don't forget a head torch. and make the faraday cage big enough to put an external hard drive in. we have faraday bags.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I built a Faraday cage based on a recent episode of the new show "America Unplugged." It seemed very simple. They just took a metal trash can, lined it with cardboard so no metal showed inside, and then taped it shut. I am going to get a 64 gig stick drive and put my digital library on it. Then I'll be covered, as long as I have a laptop in there and some way to charge it.

      Delete
  6. That's quite a list. I just need to get to the grocery store.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I let some things slide so far that I shouldn't have. Also , I want to be ready for a minimum of 30 days with no power, as a rule of thumb. That adds a little extra to the mix.

      Delete
  7. If you want to start casting bullets I would recommend starting with the two cavity Lee Molds and a small melting pot. You could get all you need for the .455 for less than 50 bucks I think. The only problem I have found is the molds are often out of stock everywhere when you try and order them. It took me a year to find the 125 grain two cavity mold I wanted and then I had to come across it at a gun show.

    After that I just spend an evening casting. It does help if you have a selection of three or more molds though so you have one to switch to when they over heat.

    The Lee sizing dies are easy to use and come with the Lee lube as well. I save all my reloading projects for Winter and then didn't do much this last time around because it was so cold I was busy cutting wood constantly. I almost always use HP38 for pistol loads or occasionally Accurate No. 5 and stick to the slower end loads for my cast bullets. I look at it as more my sustainable ammo when nothing else is available really.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have about seven .45 Colt SAA clones. I also have a Model 94 Winchester in .45 Colt. I bought several hundred lead bullets for the guns, and I bought a set of dies. But when I started , it seemed there were some differences involved in loading lead bullets and full metal jacket bullets. I have plenty of brass. What , for instance, is the reason you can't use regular bullet lube in the reloading process? I can't find anything on it in the literature but I'm assured by many that's true. What is a gas check and what impact does that have? I take buy hand loader, and their articles on loading lead bullets (which are not that common) always assume you've been doing it for years and are familiar with all the terminology. I would have through the reloading process would be the exact same, I can't see what difference it makes if a bullet is RLN or FMJ.

      Delete
  8. I dont know if you know Harry, or if they still do it but Im thinking they do. Lee Precision sells their stuff to FFL's, even 03's for 2/3 their list price. No shipping, no tax, exactly 2/3 of whatever is listed on their website.
    Cant beat it for tentative first steps into casting lead pills.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had no idea. I have my C&R, I'll send them a copy and see if they still do that. Thanks for the heads up.

      Delete
  9. Summer is the best time to stock up on what we can. The farmers markets should open soon. I noticed canning supplies are going on sale. The boys and I are talking about stocking up on fire wood. Not that we heat with wood, but for out door fires - cooking.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I plan on heating with wood a lot more than I did this past winter. The huge increase in propane prices attributed to the severe winter will undoubtedly become a routine now that the speculators have discovered people will pay virtually anything if it's cold.

      Delete
    2. you know how cap'n crunch spoke of the el nino and if i didn't read him wrong, it means another cold winter. so stocking up is only sensible.

      Delete
    3. Another winter like last winter and I'm about done. This place was never built with lots of sub zero days in mind. The pipes are not deep enough for that. And I haven't forgotten the propane rip off. That's why I am laying in more wood than usual for the fire place and wood stove.

      Delete
  10. Hey Harry,


    Some other items on my list are to get the latest book by Kevin J. Anderson on the "Saga of the Seven Suns" series called the "Dark Between the Stars"

    In the 'Saga of the Seven Sun's books,. there's an interesting civilization of humans called "The Roamers" that live in space, on asteroids and on very inhospitable planetary enviroments such as in the atmospheres of gas giants, surfaces of planets like Mercury and other places that no one else wants to live on and exploit for natural resources. The Roamers place freedom and independence as the forefront of their existence. All this takes place about maybe 500 to 700 years in the future.
    I read a great many books and I enjoy the works by writers that create similar societies that champion human freedom and that are loosely based on the United States before 1913 where spiral downward began.
    As familiar with history as I am. I can say that freedom is a behavior trait that is written in our genetic code. Orwellian styled societies burn themselves out or collapse inward within a time frame of several generations and much sometimes sooner (Nazi' Germany 1933-1945)
    Societies that survive long term usually have little central control and a "balanced equilibrium" of laws that allow for personal freedom, gain of wealth, property and guarantee the rights of individuals.
    I read much on history and I read much on science fiction in order to help gauge what may happen in the future, albeit tomorrow or two thousand years from now.

    The Constitution of the United States and its predecessor the Magna Carta, I believe are the two greatest documents of government in human history. They allow for natural law, personal freedoms, property rights and protection of the individual rights.

    If our government stumbles and falls into the abyss of tyranny and becomes an 'Orwellian Society' The two documents above will survive in hidden in old history books and hidden in peoples basements and will lye dormant ready to emerge in years to come.
    I apologize for taking up so much space on hour blog' Harry. Thinking about the upcoming 'Rawles books' as well as the book's I really, really look forward too is what got me thinking (that and too much coffee:)
    I have to say Harry that what you do in life and how you live 'inspires me' Harry. Your ability buy things (on the above list) allows your freedom and that gives you, much, much liberty than the average man in America. The price of 'Freedom' is individual responsibility and not waiting for someone else to do things for you and fixing your own problems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can't take up to much space. It's free. So no worries about that.

      I like science fiction, though I haven't had the time to read a lot of it since I retired. I'm a fan of Heinlein, in a big way. He incorporated his political beliefs, which coincide with mine, in his books. I haven't read the book you wrote about but it sounds interesting.

      I don't know if you have ever read the "Deep Winter" trilogy, by Thomas Sherry, but I think the third book in the series would be something you would be interested in. It is primarily concerned with the reconstruction of the United States after a complete collapse. All three books are good, but that one would seem to highlight a particular interest for you.

      I budget a portion of our income specifically for preparedness. Sometimes I spent more than the budget and something else has to take a temporary back seat. Sometimes it takes me a bit to get something done if it is very expensive. I'm fortunate in that I don't have a lot of routine outgoing obligations.

      Also, I've been doing this full time as a lifestyle since 1986, when I first moved into the mountains and quickly learned that being largely self sufficient was essential. I learned the hard way, and I made mistakes, but necessity is a wonderful teacher.

      Delete
    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      that was me up there that wrote about the books etc. Sorry I forgot my call sign.

      Delete
  11. Harry - you know how i hate to do this... but you forgot "wash wife's delicates", "make pies for monthly church gathering", and "write top ten list of why pioneer preppy is a wiener". i hate adding to your list of chores...but buddy...you forgot a few. i think it's the old age - bahahahahahahahah!

    oh bahahahahahahah! so sorry - but i can't stop laughing - bahahahahahah! much love to you and yours! your friend,
    kymber
    (just trying to add some silliness to your list of real jobs that need to be done. plus, it gave me another chance to call PP a wiener...and i just can't pass up those opportunities - bahahahahah!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No Trenchwarmer extraordinaire should ever pass up an opportunity :)

      Delete
    2. Kymber, well, ahem....

      I actually do the laundry here, but since it's routine I didn't put it on the list.

      We don't go to church, and both of us are on a diet all the time so no pies. :-(

      I usually keep my list of to do things in a day journal, but last night I was thinking about trying to get some order in there, and of course I kept thinking of new things and changing the list, so this log was better.

      You know I always enjoy your sense of humor. I think one reason you and J have done so well up there, especially in your early years before you had your place so well equipped and stocked, was that you had a good sense of humor. I am trying to remember if I ever read a post on your blog with a "down" feeling to it and I don't believe I have.

      I need PP to get me on track with reloading lead bullets for my .45 colts, so I'm letting you two tease each other and watching from the side lines.
      >;-)

      Delete
    3. oh Harry - you know how much i love you but even "the wiener" is gonna see you coming off as soft on this response - bahahahahah! oh there must be something in the well water today making me so fiesty!

      and yo wiener - i will never pass up an opportunity to sing "my good buddy oscar mayer has a way with B-O-L-O-G-N-A"! i'll call you a wiener every chance i get! doesn't matter how impressive your bee-keeping knowledge is! no way jose! i get a chance to call you a wiener - i grab at it - bahahahahah!

      much love to both of you!

      Delete
    4. Kymber, it must be because I am still distracted by trying to get a job in your town as a package delivery guy. ;-)

      Delete
    5. Trench Warmers who grab at wieners for the win!!!!

      Delete
  12. Dang Harry,

    Have you heard something?

    -Moe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, Moe. I just have a lot of guidelines that I instituted for myself, and I've let a lot of them slip. I'm trying to get back to having at least the basics covered. I realized how much I'd let it slide when I went out to my truck, which has vast fuel tanks, and realized it was sitting there with a quarter of just one tank. Stupid, stupid. That's what happens when I let myself get distracted. Some of the things are just seasonal, some of them just popped up, like my son's car. But I will say that so much is happening out there right now, that I want to go to bed at night knowing that if I wake up in the morning and The Day, I won't be sitting there thinking "why didn't I do this when I had the time."

      Delete
  13. Seriously dude, you need to reload and cast. No one should ever buy .38 special ammo. It's just to damn easy and cheap to make. If you cast your own bullets your shooting .38 for probably around a nickel a round (not including brass cost, which is long-lived if you don't hot rod). Even if you don't reload/cast yet you should be saving every piece of brass you can, even if its not your calibers. You should be grabbing lead wherever you find it (wheelweights, linotype, plumbers lead, old fishing weights, old pipes, etc,).

    Even if you find a bunch of say factory 8mm/06 you can always remake it into .270, 30-06 or even .308 depending on how deep you want to get into each case.

    And for .45 Colt revolver, that's a perfect cast bullet caliber. Again, you could shoot it very cheap.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I intend to. For some reason, shooting fmj from a .38 seems wrong. I have always bought my .45 Colt ammo but now it costs so much and I can't even find it most of the time. It's a two part problem for me. I have to understand the differences in the process. I need to successfully reload the .45 Colt RLN bullets I bought. Then, having satisfied myself that I have that under control, I want to progress on to casting my own bullets. I even bought the crucible for melting lead but didn't go any further. I'm always looking for ways to eek out my supplies of ammo.

      Delete
  14. Harry, Curious about the sensor light. I use a solar sensor light I can get for $13.00-$20.00 via Amazon and I haven't seen a better light at Sportsman guide. I'm not troubleshooting you as I want to add more sensor lights to my place.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The latest sale catalog had LED sensor lights, motion activated, battery powered for $26.00 a set. Solar won't work for me, alas. I want to put the lights at the entrance to my meadow, and at the gate. The canopy is so thick there in summer that it's always dim. One of the reasons my "off the grid" system failed to live up to expectations in 1999 was the fact that I only got full sunlight on my bank of solar panels about three or four hours a day, and then only in summer. I live on the top of a mountain but my buildings are not on the topographic crest and there are mountains all around me. So I go with batteries.

      Delete
  15. Tom says if you get your General ham ticket you all can talk. I am supposed to study for mine too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't have to relearn morse for that, right?

      Delete
  16. My list is gigantic since we just got back from a week and 1/2 long trip. I think I need a vacation from a vacation. Does that even make sense? All the laundry, putting stuff away, bill paying, going through mail, and other stuff added up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When you come back from a vacation, there's always a lot to do to catch up. But it's worth it, I am always glad to get back home and I appreciate what I have so much more after I have been gone for a bit.

      Delete