“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Passing the Word

I got a package from a friend yesterday.   It had some samples  of canned meat from Costco inside.  My selection of canned foods here is limited to what Walmart and Ingles offers.  Walmart has some new canned meat, but other people are stocking emergency supplies, so it has become like ammo. If you are there when they put it out, you can get some. If you are not, it's gone when you arrive.  Over the years, I've learned about most of my sources of supply from other survivalists, and I appreciate this fellow taking the time and effort to send me these samples.



The Great Value roast beef from Walmart is $2.50 a can.  It has good beef in it, but most of what is inside is beef stock, as was observed by someone else here recently. I can't remember who said that but they were right.

The Costco Kirtland roast beef was 24 cans for $77.00, and that included free shipping.  I haven't tried it yet, but I will today.  If it is as good as the Great Value product, and I'm told it is, I will order a case. It is marginally more expensive but to get a full case would be worth the extra money.

My compatriot also sent me a can of pork and a can of chicken.  Both products seemed like they'd be a good buy when they are on the "free shipping" special.  The one thing I haven't figured out, as I haven't yet researched it, is whether I can buy online from Costco without paying a membership fee. I'll work on that today.

I recently had a chance to visit with a couple of doctors, people I don't normally rub elbows with.  One of them, a Vietnam veteran who ran LRRP with dogs, doesn't call himself a survivalist but he is. He is stashing ammo madly, and buying the pails of emergency food for long term storage. I think this guy has the first nickle he ever made, but he's letting go of a denarius or two now.  He has a favorable set up in that he lives a considerable distance from the city, and has his own water supply.  The other doctor is divorced, with kids in college. He has a small apartment in the ville, but he has a brother who is a full on survivalist.  They have a family retreat in the Blue Ridge,   well stocked, and their plan is to fall back there if things go sour.



Interestingly, they are more human than the God like physicians portrayed on television. They do not intend to stay at the hospital as things fall apart. I found their candor refreshing. But then, these are both Southern doctors, who tend to be more pragmatic about life than some of their peers in Northern climes.


Incidentally, if anyone still believed that being a survivalist was reserved for social pariahs and rural people, the example of those two individuals would tend to give that the lie.

People from all levels of the socio-economic strata are doing what they can.  Not the great mass of people, who remain sheeple, but there are a lot more people in the preparedness mind set than I can ever remember.




The Rover


Without giving anything away about the plot,  I thought this was a truly excellent movie. It reminded me of The Road.

It's ten years after a global economic collapse.  Australia has a feeble government hanging on in Sydney. The Australian army, what remains of it, is struggling to maintain order but it's a losing proposition.  You can't let your dog outside because people will eat them. The Sheeple have long since been devoured by events, and the individuals who remain are struggling to get through each day.  China is harvesting Australia's economic resources and the Chinese are everywhere.

I identified with the protagonist from the beginning.  I don't want to be a spoiler, so I will just say the show revolves about his obsession with recovering his stolen vehicle. You only figure out why in the final scene. When I saw it, I thought "this guy thinks just like I do!"

It's showing on Direct TV pay per view now. I'm buying the DVD for my personal library, money well spent.








23 comments:

  1. I shop at Costco once a month. I always stock up on almonds. We like almond butter and jam sandwiches in our house, but there has been a massive recall on almonds. I make my own now. Sometimes I make my own almond milk to. As for the jam I made that last year from our June Berries. I will can again once I have time on a cold weekend day.

    I just got a case of Costco's canned chicken stalk. I've never gotten it before. I'll have to see how I like it. I make a lot of soups in the crock pot over the winter, so I know they'll come in handy.

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    1. Let me know what you think of it. I'm always looking for things to add to my long term food storage, variety being the spice of life and a good thing for stored supplies.

      I don't think I have ever actually seen a Costco, though I have heard a lot about them. I wish we had one near by here. Or even within half a days drive.

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  2. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    I just saw the Rover last night on I-tunes,

    Yeah; it Kicked Ass!

    Kinda reminded me somewhat of "The Road Warrior" at a much slower pace and replace the 'mutant zombie bikers' with 'skinny looking people' with guns that are trying to get by anyway they can. All the charactors look as if they have 'all' have had major trauma's of some sort in their lives and have that washed out, burn out thousand yard stare thing going on. The main character played that off very, very well.
    I also can relate to the main character and I probably would have done many of the same things if push comes to shove.

    Harry' I am also looking forward to that report on the stored meat from Costco.

    I am in a position to see many people in my area that are 'building up' their stocks of food, ammo, etc. They also come from every social strata.

    Earlier this week' I was making a large run at Walmart and things were slow later in the evening, and I asked the clerk 'a middle aged lady' of reasonable intelligence' if people have been buying extra stuff because of 9/11 coming up?. She looked at me with her for a second with a bit of surprise for not being asked about buying cigarettes or something else. She said no. I said that I am buying a little bit more this time because I spent time in the Persian Gulf while in the military and I know how dangerous people are over there and I really hope nothing happens this 9/11.
    Her reply was the standard 'Thank You for your service' and 'no I have not noticed anything' with a curious look. I just said' thanks and have a nice evening.

    Every now and then I place a well placed question just to try and gauge whats going on. I try to be real sly about it and not give myself away.

    I grabbed a few items last night and the same clerk was there and she did not 'recognize me' or remember the conversation as I passed through her checkout line. I did not engage in conversation as not to allow the neurons in her brain remember previous conversation. When someone deals with 'hundreds of customers' a night. Remembering conversations becomes a considerable task.

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    1. When you ask people questions at work, they almost always give you the blank stare and a neutral answer. That's because if people don't get the answer they are looking for, they tend to complain. When I worked at the state park I got letters written to the governor about me all the time. Then they would wind their way down the chain til they got to the Park Ranger, and he would come and tell me you "can't say things like that to campers."

      But I did. There are so many pigs out there, and they think if they are buying something, and you work there, you have to kiss their rears. I enjoyed disabusing people of that notion. And anyway, it was just a "senior program" job that I was doing for something to do, so the worst they could do was fire me and I didn't care if they did. When the camp store stopped selling camping gear and started using the space for " custom chocolates" and other things to please the city sheeple, I bought most of the on hand stock for cost. It was a great deal on things I could use.

      I do the same thing you do, I try to sound out people in places I happen to bump into them. You learn some interesting things that way.

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  3. I thought the movie was really good. I believe it and The Road are the two most realistic representations of what a collapse would really be like that I have ever seen.

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  4. Survivalist doctors are like unicorns. If you can get one on your side, you're golden. Of all te tings I wish I had the biggest is a 'like-minded' doctor who'd be willing to write me the 'scrips for antibiotics and painkillers that I can forsee needing. Sounds like this is a relationship that you may want to slowly nurture along.

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    1. I've known both these guys for some time, but never had the chance to talk to them about anything outside their work. They're good types, and don't think they are God Almighty because they are doctors.

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  5. Harry i missed this post somehow. We are planning on stocking up on dry stores next week. I know I'm behind many, but at the same time well ahead of most. I will check out the movie.

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  6. Rob, I don't think there really is a "behind" in food storage. It's always changing, never static. I think you are in good shape overall. The movie is worth watching.

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    1. The busiest times at the market are 3pm to 6 pm. We have stopped at 730pm to pick up milk and its dead. The seniors stop in the morning for coffee and such and I have seen them play cards with friends. I like small town life.

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    2. Damn those seniors! Always clogging things up. I get mad at them and then I remember I am one, but I still get p.o.'d.

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  7. We do not have a Cosco here. But we do have Sams.

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    1. There used to be a town that had a Sam's up here. It was forty miles away and on the wrong side of the mountains, though. They closed it some years back.

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  8. With things selling out like that it sounds like you have a lot more preppers than in the UK. My wife has a negative view of me prepping and says it's morbid!. I'll have to look out for that film, I heard it was good.

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    1. Kev, ask her if she thinks it is morbid for you to carry life insurance? Same thing. I'd think she'd be happy to have a husband who has the G2 to look ahead and plan for the families welfare. Another thing, I've never spent a dime on equipment, supplies, or literature that wasn't useful to me in one way or another, even with no disasters.
      For us here, there have been survivalists for as long as I can remember. My dad wouldn't have called himself one but he kept food and water stored for the day we would fight the Russians, everybody in the 1950's and 1960's figured it had to come, sooner or later. Then in the 1970's and 1980's it was the philosophy that was popular with a lot of single men who were outdoorsmen. I don't think it really became main stream here until Katrina and 9-11. A lot of people woke up then. But they didn't want to be associated with survivalism, which still conjures up the picture of bearded old guys living in cabins in the mountains (kind of like me!). Instead, the word prepper became fashionable, because it sounded more yuppy friendly in my opinion. However, my friends and I have argued about this. Some say the words are synonymous, some are still down on "survivalist".
      We have tentatively agreed , just among me and my cronies, that the two words are interchangeable. In my heart of hearts, though, I still think of "preppers" as a form of "survivalist lite." ;-)

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  9. Arturo Longoria, a blogger called Woods Roamer, has a kindle book name THE TRAIL - it too is a pretty good read. Captaincrunch, the setting is the south Texas area, so its description of the land will probably sound very familiar to you.

    I've got to check out THE ROVER - sounds pretty interesting - Thanks for the review.

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    1. Anon, that sounds interesting. I'm always look for something to read, and kindle books are cheap and easy to get.

      I think you'll like the Rover. It's not phony like so many movies based on post apocalyptic novels are.

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  10. Harry, You will be pleased to know that "The Rover" was film in our area, you may have noticed the familiar landscape. I haven't seen the movie as it is yet to be released here, but I look forward to watching it. We had movie stars in our midst while they were filming. Russell Crowe was spotted regularly in Port Augusta and near by towns. Our son in law is a farrier and he got the job of shoeing all the horses for the movie, how fantastic is that?

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    1. Tania, I think that you have a different movie in mind, one with the same name but a different plot. This one didn't have any famous actors but it was a good show. I'm glad you are back on the air, I've missed your posts and your really great pictures. I told my daughter all about the plated lizard.

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    2. Ok whoops! Sorry, I should have done my research first before commenting...

      I think I have the right movie. The Rover was filmed around this area. I did however get mixed up with another movie that was being filmed at the same time.. Guy Pearce from The Rover was definitely one of the actors seen around...

      The other movie had Russell Crowe directing and acting and was called "The Water Diviner" and that one had the horses in it lol! A story about Gallipoli. Keep an eye out for it :)

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    3. I certainly will keep an eye out for it. Gallipoli is an interest of mine. When I was in the Marines I participated in two exercises in Turkey and we got to see some of the battlefield. I remember the really good movie on Gallipoli that came out twenty years or so ago, don't remember the name but it was excellent.

      I get movies mixed up all the time. There was one I really wanted, and an older one with the same name, and I had the devil of a time ordering the right one!

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  11. We watched "The Rover" last night on your recommendation. We enjoyed it!

    -Moe

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    1. Moe, I thought it was good. I especially liked the resolution to the question of why the car meant so much. Glad you enjoyed it.

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