“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Simplified version of the Mormon Food Storage Calculator, and thoughts on food storage.

Mormon Food Storage Calculator Link


This version will only require that you put in the number of people you are planning for, and their ages.
There is a more complicated version but for the average individual, dealing only with family and perhaps a few friends, this one is more than sufficient.





This is one of the best survival books I have in my library.  They are difficult to find, but it can be done. If you have this book, and the food storage calculator, you are well on the way to having the knowledge required to start building your long term food storage. There is also a great deal of information in the book on just about every survival topic you can imagine.

The information below on the book comes from Commander Zero and was added after the original posting.


"By the by, here's the link to the LDS Prep manual:
https://ldsavow.com/PrepManualGeneral.html

Note that it is NOT sanctioned or endorsed by the LDS. The guy who put it together is the son of the couple that used to run our local LDS cannery. He takes it very seriously and has his own website that might be interesting to read: http://www.ldsavow.com

I've read the book and it is definitely one of the more comprehensive and complete books on the subject. Not perfect, but definitely one of the best so far.



Might wanna put the link in the original post for folks."

As for food storage methodology:

Canned food , stored in a cool and dry place, will last almost indefinitely.  Canned food found in a sunken Civil War river steamer which had been covered with sand was found to be perfectly edible 150 years later.  I've eaten Navy Beans from my own food storage that had been there for more than 12 years. The texture was a bit degraded but the beans, cooked with bacon, were quite tasty.  Most people know the signs of problems with canned food.  Bulged cans, rusted cans, or cans that hiss when you open them.  Of course, if the food was canned at a significantly lower altitude than you live at, it will hiss anyway. If I have questions about a can of food, I will feed some of the contents to the chickens and wait a day or so. If they are fine, the food is probably fine as well.



Dry goods and dehydrated foods should be stored in mylar bags, and flushed with nitrogen. Then the sealed bag goes into a food grade plastic pail with a gamma lid.  I have food in my stash that dates back to a 1999 delivery and it is as good as the day it was put in the pail.

Here's an excerpt of a comment by Dani in South Africa. I never heard of the Bay Leaf idea but she knows her stuff and it would be cheaper than Nitrogen packing.


"Personally, I wouldn't store tinned beans - dry beans last for ages, and, providing you have shoved a sprig of bay leaves in with them that deters any creepy-crawlies from taking up residence :)"

Inger said “Bay leaf works for us too”



If you are going to store a lot of red wheat and corn, you need to have a grain mill. This is one of the items you don't want to scrimp on. If you have to save up a while to get one, that's better than getting a cheap grain mill.





Corn and wheat are great for long term storage, but you need to be able to make them into corn meal and flour to use the food.  You can do it with a matate, I suppose, but it would sure wear your arms out.



I know I've talked about all this before, but just as a recap, smoked hams are great long term storage food. You can hang them in the sack, without refrigeration, in some cool, dry place and they will keep forever. Since you need protein, and fats, this is a good way to get it.  Ham does wonders for beans, rice, potatoes and other foods that by themselves, can get to be boring and unappetizing.


 While I'm thinking about meat, let me put in a plug for Yoders canned bacon. I buy this by the case. It's very, very good.  Not cheap, but bacon is tasty, and the fats it provides can be used to liven up a lot of other foods.

I know fats aren't good for you in normal times, but you do need them to stay healthy. In a crash, where you can't go down and buy food at the grocery store, this is the kind of thing you want stashed away in your basement.

Yoders Bacon has been hard to find in the last few years, as more and more people began to become involved in taking some responsibility for their own well being. Particularly for people who think all there is to it is a few cases of food in the garage, this is a quick answer.  It's easier to justify a case of canned meat than it is a pail of nitrogen packed macaroni or apple slices.  So demand is high and when you find it, you need to buy as much as you can afford towards your established stocking level.





Don't forget butter and cheese.  Yes, I have big number ten cans of cheese and butter powder, and they do alright for cooking.  But when you want to put some cheese or butter on a piece of bread, they don't make it.  This is Red Feather from New Zealand.  You can find it at most survival oriented websites that offer food.  I'm told that the market for Red Feather was originally mostly with people who sailed long distances on sail boats. But with the advent of a wider survivalist network, it has proven popular for long term storage.  I have gone through a lot of this butter, because I like it better than what I can get at the store.  I know it's not cost effective to eat it when I could get something else , but I do believe in using what you store to a point, so you don't wind up buying cases of food that turn out to be unsuitable when you need them.



Red Feather Cheese comes from Australia.  It's just as good as the butter, and a few cases of good, tasty cheese and butter in cans gives whoever is doing the cooking a lot more flexibility in creating meals people will eat. This is important , especially with kids.  Although I can't provide any historical examples, I have repeatedly read that people under extreme stress will soon tire of foods they are unfamiliar with, or find repetitious, and won't eat. Kids are said to be particularly susceptible to this.



I should also mention that you can get canned cheese of excellent quality from Kraft.  It's made in Australia, and comes by the case or can when you order it. I've used a lot of this and it's worth every penny.


MRE Depot offers canned bread in a number of different grains and styles. Most people will make their own bread if things go badly and grocery stores are not available. Still, a few cases of canned bread will give you some breathing room if you are trying to work through something like a hurricane or an earthquake.

Canned bread isn't expensive. I don't like it as well as fresh bread, but I certainly wouldn't turn my nose up at it under emergency circumstances.





I haven't said anything about canning, because although I bought the book on how to do it, I didn't buy a pressure cooker.  When I was researching it, I found I could go to our county cannery and have produce canned there for just a fraction of what it would cost to buy the produce and can it myself. Our county just upgraded the public cannery and it has all new equipment and is very efficient, so I have decided to go that route.  Also, there is a Mormon cannery near Atlanta, where you can go and buy canned foods all set to pick up. They don't let you can your own anymore unless you are a Mormon, but they will let you buy the stuff at very low prices.

I didn't address root cellars because my one experiment with doing that ended up like my gardening experiment this summer, it just didn't work.  I tried storing potatoes in a cool, dry place in boxes, filled with sawdust. My English and Canadian friends tell me this is where I went wrong. Since I don't grow any vegetables, I haven't put any more energy into it.  Unfortunately, I will have to at some point because nobody can store enough food , and I will have to grow some if the need arises. I am "weak" in the agricultural department.




46 comments:

  1. Dear Harry - what an awesome post to share and help people with - you are a pure doll! (now i know that you are blushing and Matt or PP are going to make some kind of comment but whatever). i love coming here and learning. i used an LDS calendar from 1998 or 1999 and they are so trust-worthy and reliable - if you follow their simple rules, you can figure out very quickly what a 10yr food storage system equates to. thanks for sharing!

    much love to you and yours always, Harry. always. your friend,
    kymber

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    1. Hey kymber,

      (captaincrunch)

      (now i know that you are blushing and Matt or PP are going to make some kind of comment but whatever).

      Kymber?????

      We all just need to get together and invade 'Nova Scotia' We can win everyone's hearts and minds by bringing beer and pizza.
      Matt can be ground support, harry can come in on a Huey (air support) and myself can come in by sea in one of the old PBR boats I used in the Persian Gulf. Maybe we can rename Nova Scotia "New Texas"

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    2. Kymber, I went to town yesterday and came back with my long bed, extended cab pickup filled to the brim with supplies, primarily food. I went ahead and spent the money to get everything up to speed. I am very tight with a nickle and usually only buy when something is on sale, but things are getting so out of hand I judged it to be foolish to wait. I may have spent a little extra if nothing happens but the peace of mind of knowing I have everything I can think of is worth it. That's what put me in the frame of mine to write this post. It will bore most people because they already know all of it, but I thought there might be some people out there who don't, and now if ever is the time to be doing the stocking up thing.

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    3. captain - i keep telling all of my blogging friends, Harry, Matt and even PP (the weiner) - as well as you and a whole pile of others that cape breton would take all of you good folks in a heartbeat! and we wouldn't even mind if you renamed us "new texas" - bahahahah!

      Harry - it is a really good feeling when you can stock up, feel good about your choices and then be able to relax enough to say "ok - i think i'm good". this world is getting crazier by the minute, and i am glad that you are reminding people to start stocking up if they already aren't. for the rest of us that do, it's always a good reminder. we're feeling really good about our preps and now preserving all of our garden in a variety of ways - we'll have fresh, healthy food all winter. thanks again Harry!

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  2. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Harry, I was kinda worried that much of the canned stuff bought including Spam, etc. back in 2009 would be getting kinda weird by now. I know to store cans in a cool dry, dark place etc.
    I heard from some old timers that flipping the cans upside down and then flipping them back again a year later or so can make them last longer???

    I did flip them upside down and that was a little over a year ago so I guess I will flip them back up again.

    I have a lot of food storage from the Mormon Cannery. I just bought generic stuff that is good to eat with the help of friends and their wives who know how to make stuff and eat a normal diet.
    As a bachelor, I dont know what I am doing when it comes to food etc. I dont have the patience to cook anything nor do I want to try. I can rebuild mechanical things in my living room etc. just dont ask me to cook anything.
    In a 'Crap Hits the Fan" scenario I will be getting together with some other people and they can cook (I wish I could bug out to Nova Scotia 'err, New Texas) They have to cook there, everythings frozen)

    I did buy a few of those 'Dak' canned hams at walmart yesterday. On a side note, walmart had, lots and lots of ammo. The case was fully stocked except for .22 of course.



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    1. CC, you need to find a woman to shack up with. I am not kidding, there must be someone out there around you that would welcome a partnership. You don't have to get married, if that puts you off. You're going to need someone you can trust and rely on, nobody can do it all on their own. I am more comfortable relying on one person than a bunch of other people, myself. But you are more outgoing than I am and that may work for you.

      I never heard of the flipping the can thing, but though I can't see how it would help, I don't see how it could hurt. I don't pull off the labels and cover the cans with Vaseline or any of that , though I know people who do. I just put the cardboard cases on two by fours (never on the concrete floor) and keep the space air conditioned and heated . I know if the power goes out I will lose that capability but since I will then be eating what I stored in a grid down situation, I don't expect that to be a problem.

      I have some DAK hams. They are essentially spam , but hell, I like Spam and I have a lot of that stored as well. Besides, cut up with dehydrated onions, a little DAK ham will make rice, pasta, etc a feast.

      There was plenty of .40 S&W, and 9mm at our Walmart yesterday. No .22 LR, no .44 magnum, no .38 special or .357 magnum. But that's not a big deal for me, I have enough and just pick up the odd boxes out of habit anyway.

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  3. Wow - That is certainly a huge amount of info - thanks for taking the time to share it with us. I have never seen tinned butter or cheese here, but we do get tightly sealing buckets similar to your pic.

    Personally, I wouldn't store tinned beans - dry beans last for ages, and, providing you have shoved a sprig of bay leaves in with them that deters any creepy-crawlies from taking up residence :)

    Lucky you to have a canning facility nearby - never heard of that service to the public either LOL

    Only thing you didn't cover is how I'm going to keep RMan's beers from deteriorating... The contents of the bottles normally have a 2 year shelf life, and I don't think he'd take to home brewed - he's very p-a-r-t-i-c-u-l-a-r about his favourite tipple. There again, home brewed wold be better than nothing, not so?! Bwahahaha

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    1. Dani,
      I get canned beans at a discount grocery store for ten cents a can. They come in all varieties and flavors. One I particularly like is called "chili beans" and you just open them up and eat them from the can if you want to. I do store a lot of dried beans too. In fact, the sickest I've ever gotten from eating something was our first experiment in cooking dried beans. I knew you soaked them, but not for how long. So I soaked a big pot for two days. Bubbles were coming up off the beans and I thought it meant they were ready to cook. It really meant that they had spoiled. That was when we just starting out and I didn't have any of my good books like "Cooking with Beans."

      Most rural counties in the South have a public cannery, paid for by county tax money. People bring their produce there, and if you don't know how to do the canning there are teenaged girls there who show you how, from the high school. Everything you need is right on the premises and it is all commercial grade equipment. It is very cheap.

      I didn't know bay leaves would kill the insects and larvae. Here we flush the food with nitrogen. It kills any insect pests or their eggs.

      I don't know how to keep beer for a lengthy period. I think the home brewing really might be the way to go. Somebody who comes by here brews beer at home but I can't remember who it is.

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  4. I really enjoy the Great Value canned chicken, a packet of mayonaisse or mustard, and a hard boiled egg and you good for at least 3 sandwiches. The Roast Beef - the quantity of meat in my two cans was pretty meager, about 1/2 meat, 1/2 stock. Not bad tasting but not for a grown ass man with an appetite for crying out loud! :^)

    I had heard that tip of flipping cans, but never tried it before. My stash is pretty small, about 3 months for the four of us. About 80% canned, sheltering in place.

    Thank you for the post - some good tips there.

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    1. The CostCo canned beef. Great stuff.

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    2. Great Value canned chicken is really good, and priced right. The Roast Beef is new in my area, and you are lucky to find a can or two. You're right, there isn't a lot of beef in it, but I mix a can in with rice and it's a really good meal for four people if times get hard. The Corned Beef is good too, but even harder to find. We only have a Walmart, no access to a Sams Club unless you want to spend the fuel to drive a couple of hours one way.

      3 months will get you by any kind of natural disaster. I was planning for Y2K , which I thought would be a real problem. I subscribed to Gary North's newsletter and the whole nine yards. So all my stocking levels were set up for the long run, and I have just never changed them.

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    3. Zero, I wish we had a Costco. I have never even seen one.

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  5. Canned bacon? Cool! I like when you do the food storage posts. Always interesting tips. I had a can of tomato sauce that was a few years expired explode recently when I tried to open it. I tossed it!

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    1. That's odd, because tomatoes are acid and usually last a long time. Might have been a pin hole in the can somewhere, and throwing it away was the right thing to do. Especially now, when everything can be replaced, I don't take any chances.

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  6. I like your posts about food storage. I always learn something and find things I have overlooked. I do mostly home canning as I have all the supplies and as far as I know, there is no LDS cannery close to me. Today I'm canning butter. Next week it will be more bacon and sausage. After that, turkey. I dehydrate lots of vegetables for use in soups, etc. And a whole lot of onions, for I use onions a lot. Being an apartment dweller, I have to find alternatives to gardening. You have given me some good ideas. Thanks.

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    1. Vicki, you sound like just the woman for CC. ;-)

      If my wife ever decides to retire, and if we stay here, I am sure we will grow some food and can it. I think that's an important skill and I know we are lacking there. I use dehydrated onions a lot too, but I get mine in big pails from Walden Feeds.

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  7. Harry,
    Have been following your blog for a long time now and appreciate you thoughts on "preparing for situations". I have along way to go to catch up to you, but am working on it. Buddy of mine and I have been tossing around getting a grain mill and you just pushed us over the edge to commit. Suggestions on brands and where to buy would be greatly appreciated.
    Alex in NC

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    1. Alex, here's a link to an old Mother Earth News article to get you up to speed on grain mills.

      http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/choosing-a-grain-mill-zm0z04djzkin.aspx#axzz3CHfB0fW1

      I buy a lot of things from Emergency Essentials at BePrepared.com and they will send you a free catalog if you request one on their web site.

      Rainy Day foods at Rainydayfoods.com sells them.

      I'd steer clear of any electric mill, for obvious reasons. It's a good idea to get one with a provision for hooking up a belt and running it off a small motor or a bike frame. Save up enough to buy a good one. We bought a cheap one the first time out and it was a complete waste of money.

      Lehmans at lehmans.com has a great catalog and web page. I have a lot of equipment I bought from them and have always been happy with it.

      Good luck. If I can help in any way let me know.

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  8. re: kymber's comment....

    now that I know you're a doll, it just won't be the same from now on. Next, she'll be having us believing that you're all cuddly.

    bleh

    but good on you for bringing back the truck loaded up

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    1. I've been called a lot of things, but I don't think ever a doll before. However, I never mind endearments from the ladies.

      Yeah, I just decided to get a lot of things caught up in one fell swoop, instead of eternally waiting for the things I need to go on sale or show up at the discount grocery. I am getting ancy with all this going on today.

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    2. see? i knew that one of the smart-*sses, i mean my brothers, would have to make a comment - bahahahahah!
      (p.s. - Matt buddy, he really IS cuddly. and he's known around some parts as a "hugger" - bahahahah!)

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    3. oh darn... the disappointment.... ;)

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    4. bhahahahahahahahahah! oh Matt - that's such a good one - bahahahahah!

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  9. Excellent post, buddy! Great pics too. I think youre missing the boat on the canning thing...while it makes little sense to can stuff now when you can buy it cheaply enough, later on you might not be able to. When that time comes, it'll eb nice to can the deer or chicken meat that you're not using right away. If you do decide to go the canning route, get the All American brand of canner. Expensive, but none finer. Don't know if you saw it, but I ran into some home-canned food from 1963 and the jars that held their seals looked fine. http://commanderzero.com/blog/2010/09/07/canning-time-capsule/
    I rarely can these days since I can just buy what I need but I have cases of canning jars and lids in storage. Might wanna think about getting a case or two of lids as trade stock.

    Great post!

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    1. I think it was about a year ago I was all fired up on canning, and was doing the research. Then I found out how expensive the All American pressure cookers were, and at the same time I discovered I could buy canned food for a lot less than I could buy produce and can it. The only way it was cost effective was to grow your own food. So it's this big long chain of things you have to do. First, you have to have your own garden and successfully raise food, then you have to buy all the equipment and paraphernalia, then you have to learn how to use it. I just kind of groaned and relegated it to the bottom of the list.

      Then this summer my test plots all got washed out by this constant and unseasonable rain we are having, so I got no veggies and wasted my money on boards and soil. We have red, flinty clay here so I had to buy soil to plant in.

      I know I need to get up to speed on it, At the moment, I'm rebuilding the porch and some retaining walls. Once that's done, as of this moment, there are no big tasks looming over me and I will try to give it another go.

      I can get all the jars and lids and such at Walmart. The canner I'll have to buy on line but everybody and their dog in the business seems to carry the All American gear.

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    2. Harry...If you end up buying canning jars at Walmart, stick to the name brands - Ball or Kerr. They have some off brands and I bought a couple cases of those. I had nothing but trouble with them - cracked and broken jars during the canning process and lids that didn't seal. I have heard from several other folks who do a lot of canning that they have had the same experience. My jars are almost all Kerr brand, for that is what I can get most easily locally. Rarely do I have a problem with them, and if I do, it is usually operator error.

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    3. Vicki, that's good to know. I will remember that advice. Next time I go to Walmart I am going to pick up some boxes of cans and lids for barter if nothing else. That was a suggestion I got today and it makes sense. I don't know if I want to plunk down a couple hundred for an All American pressure cooker I don't plan on using any time soon, but maybe I should. It might be like ammo, you don't need it til you really need it and then it's too late to go shopping.

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    4. Harry...I would love to have an All American pressure canner, but it isn't within my budget. I have a 16 quart Presto that sells for around $70-$80 and a Mirro 22 quart that sells for not much more. The larger one will hold two layers of pint jars. Both require a rubber gasket in the lid. After 4 years of hard use, I still haven't had to replace a gasket. I just bought extra gaskets and stashed them away. I tend to pinch a penny and just can't justify the price of an All American when I am getting the same results with what I have.

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  10. By the by, here's the link to the LDS Prep manual:
    https://ldsavow.com/PrepManualGeneral.html

    Note that it is NOT sanctioned or endorsed by the LDS. The guy who put it together is the son of the couple that used to run our local LDS cannery. He takes it very seriously and has his own website that might be interesting to read: http://www.ldsavow.com

    I've read the book and it is definitely one of the more comprehensive and complete books on the subject. Not perfect, but definitely one of the best so far.

    Might wanna put the link in the original post for folks.

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    1. It's a hell of a book. One of my best. I'll put that link in there and thanks for the information.

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  11. There isn't a LDS cannery within hundreds of miles of where we live. I can grow potatoes so dehydrated them and sealed them in buckets with mylar. Great for tossing into soups or whatever. Lots of good information in your post, thanks so much. We love Yoders bacon. Time to buy more before the price goes up again.

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    1. Twoshooz, We are lucky to have one but it is a long drive away. However, the county public cannery is just about the same set up except you have to bring everything you want canned, while the Mormons already have most of the food there and you just pay a flat rate (nominal) for the product. Sounds like dehydrated potatoes is a good thing though, I use potatoes as the base for a lot of soups and stews.

      I agree, Yoders bacon is always hard to find in stock and sometimes the delivery period is lengthy. It's so good it's hard not to just eat it for regular food instead of emergency, long term storage food.

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  12. Harry, since you are talking about various companies here, I was wondering if you had gotten all the supplier links from your last blog before you closed it down. I found your old blog and can see all the links if you need them plus a number of the old posts. I'd thought I'd ask you before I just blurt out the address in case you don't want it "out there" again.

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    1. Matt, I deleted that blog. How on earth can it still be out there? I think best to let sleeping dogs lie. You remember all the fussing and all that went on at the end there, I'd just as soon not have that get going again. However, I'd like to see the old blog just myself so send me the link if you don't mind to.

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    2. Once online it never truly goes away. and that "fussing" was why I'd thought I'd ask before hand. Check your email and I'll get it sent soon.

      Delete
  13. We love the Red Feather Butter. I'm working through my storage now and went back to Emergency Essentials (where I have always gotten it before), but EE wasn't selling it anymore. I just looked now and they have it stocked again (with a much higher price than last time, of course!). Haven't tried the cheese but have been tempted.

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    1. Mermaid, the cheese is very good. When my kids were living here, before they were grown and gone, they used to go down to one of the store rooms and get the canned cheese, and put it on the Red Baron pizzas they liked. I used to eat it on soda crackers. Canned butter, cheese and bacon take some looking for, because they are always out of stock and you have to search out somebody who has them. I have had good luck with MRE Depot, but sometimes I find the supplies with odd little companies by just googling the product I'm after.

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  14. Simply amazing post! Mine storage is different in the fact that moat of mine is growing in the ground. I think you're right to cook what you store. Nothing could be worse than discovering you don't like it in a situation where it's all you've got.
    I've never heard of canned bread before. Later in the year I'm going to build a food store in the garden so I store more cans and staples like spices and sauces as well aa things like toothpaste and deodorant. It will also give me space to syore what I preserve myself like jams, dried fruit and hopefully grain in the future.
    Looks like we've got to get you gardening now to make you self sufficient!

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  15. Kev, there are some holes in my self sufficiency plan. One of them is my lack of gardening skills. I only tried the experiment this summer because someone was kidding me about my rather lackadaisical attitude toward growing food.

    Canned bread is good because if you are worn out, and just too tired to bake bread, you can open it up, and have decent bread with your meal. At some point, especially if the power is out and you can't keep the yeast cold, baking bread will have to go to the peta or flat bread type and I don't like that so much. So I figure canned bread is good on a number of fronts. If you don't have canned bread over there, at least you have Lyles Golden Syrup! I used to trade things from our PX in Italy to the British stationed in Naples for things from their PX, and I grew addicted to Lyles Golden Syrup. Nothing like that here.

    When you build your food store out in your garden, be sure to build it sturdy. In bad times, people might try to break in if food is short.

    We try to use recipes from our long term storage food cookbooks, so that if we ever have to use the food for "real" we won't suddenly find out we have stocked a lot of things we can't eat, or don't want to eat. Somebody gave me that advice back in the 1980's and it has proven to be good.

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  16. Bay leaf works for us too. This was a very interesting and detailed post that I would like to, need to actually, come back and study some more.

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    1. Inger, I am really annoyed that with all my reading , and over so many years, I have been buying nitrogen when I could have been using Bay leaf instead. I guess sometimes I am stricken with Hubris and think I know everything, but there's always more to learn.

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  17. Harry, the bay leaf only keeps out bugs, it will not prevent oxidation - so you still need the 02 absorbers for long term on the dry foods. Can your own bacon! I've got a case (or ten,lol) put up for less than 1/3 what Yoders costs! Also, regarding All American and other pressure gauge products, unless you have a way to test and keep that gauge correct you are asking for trouble. I like the rocker style canners - you do need to replace the gaskets, but they are cheap, storable and my current one is on it's 3rd year, the last one went 20 years for me. I was very particular about washing, drying and occasionally giving it a light olive oiling. You can get a non-gauge canner (medium size) for $100 or less. My $39 one from 25 yrs ago is still with me. Agree with Vicki on sticking to name brand jars & lids. A box or 2 of lids will get you nowhere, they aren't reusable unless you buy Tattlers. Also, while I'm not a Jackie Clay, I've been gardening and canning for well over 25 years, the last 3 only a few hours from you, so if you or the Mrs. ever have any questions, please don't hesitate to drop me an email (flstarladyatyahoodotcom). Jan in NWGA

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    1. Jan,
      I appreciate the good advice. There seems to be a wide range of opinion on the best equipment for canning, although the issue of buying Ball or other name brand jars is universally agreed as far as I can tell. Probably your level of experience is the same as Jackie Clay, you just haven't written like she has. Maybe you should give it a try, though!

      Thanks for the email address. We will have a few more things to take care of here before I can divert assets and energy to getting into canning, but we will have to before long and experienced advisers are most welcome.

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  18. Harry,

    At what store(s) can I find Yoder's bacon? --Troy

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    1. Troy, I don't think it's sold in stores. I believe you have to order it. MRE Depot has it when they can keep it in stock. Internet Grocers used to have it but I think they went out of business. Google Yoders and you will come up with places that sell a wide range of Yoders products, they make a lot more than just bacon.

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