“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Monday, September 29, 2014

The World of Late Night Radio



I spend a lot of nights up pottering around.  Sometimes I read, and once in awhile something will be worth watching on one of the satellite tv channels.  Primarily, though, I listen to late night radio.

It's a whole different world than the day time broadcasting people are more familiar with.

On the shortwave, there are all sorts of patriot radio stations,  end of times radio stations,  and survivalist oriented stations. Some of them are fairly high powered in terms of transmission power and they are licensed.  Most of them , though, seem to originate in barns or shacks in Tennessee, Oklahoma,  or Florida.  They have irregular transmission times, and the quality of the programming varies but it's usually interesting even if you don't believe everything you hear.

There are also some FM stations that broadcast syndicated late night radio.  I like Coast to Coast AM, myself.  It's been around for decades and sometimes the byzantine power struggles that the leading characters engage in over control of the show are more interesting than the show itself. Art Bell started it a long time ago, and it had a following of about 3 million listeners nightly at it's peak. Then there was a series of coupe de etates'  after Bell retired,  he came back out of retirement, and on, and on.
It's still pretty interesting.  I listen to my local talk radio station to get the program , usually from about 0100 to 0500.  You can go to their web page and subscribe, but it costs something in the order of $30.00 a year and I'm not paying that.  About all it gets you anyway is access to on line listening when you feel like it, and access to the archives for shows you've missed.

Because of terrain masking, I can only receive one FM station at my house with regular FM radio receivers. Fortunately for me, instead of being one of the many religious broadcasting stations or country western music stations up here, the station I do get is a news, talk radio station coming out of a college NE of my location.  I have one of my best FM radios locked on to that frequency.

I'd be in dire straits without all the different radio programs at night. Sometimes I even learn something but I'm almost always amused.

On a different tact, I posted some you tube videos that contain the full versions of Discovery Channel, BBC, and History Channel programs from some years back. They are just below this post. They're all good, informative shows. Some are documentaries, and some are "docu-dramas" but they're all interesting. I thought there might be some folks out there who don't have satellite or cable, and might have missed seeing them.  All of the programs are older but I don't think they are outdated.

Dreary day here,  drizzling rain since before dawn and cold. That's why I am fiddling around with the computer so much today.

24 comments:

  1. With the Ebola thing raging in West Africa, and that respiratory virus that came up from below the Southern border that's moving swiftly across America, the "After Armageddon" video is especially worth watching, IMHO.

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    1. I agree. Both of those are relative to the subject of the show.

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    2. Im putting my tin foil hat on and say the Ebola thing is part of the Chinese plan to depopulate Africa and strip it for resources and possible relocation of displaced Chinese after the Next Big War. They already lease huge chunks of it for growing food and gathering minerals.......

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    3. Sounds like a hell of a plot for a post apocalyptic novel there!

      I noticed in The Rover that it was the Chinese who took over Australia and were stripping it bare of resources.......

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    4. Oh, Im just talking all Art-Bell-y. However, China has dumped a buttload of money into Africa lately. Theyve bought enormous leases of land to grow food, have been setting up clinics, 'donating' apartment buildings and housing, and, to a much smaller degree, establishing a military toehold there for 'security' purposes. Their very clever and far-sighted...Africa is , by and large, unexploited and completely incapable of taking advantage of its resources....and the Chinese will be more than happy to spread some goodwill around. When oil leases, mining leases, and that sort of thing are being handed out by the governments there they will look favorably on the generous and beneficient Chinese and freeze out everyone else. At least, thats what it looks like to me.

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    5. They're welcome to it, as far as I'm concerned. With the possible exception of South Africa, the rest of the place is still a nightmare.

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  2. Doesn't make you upset to listen to end of world stuff? Or just more motivated to hone your survival skills? I am glad you like the pictures from here. If this drought continues, I better get some better survival skills myself. I tell you, the animals are perishing and it is awful to contemplate their suffering.

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    1. Inger, I know things are very difficult out there. I watched a series of news articles on the drought, and it showed towns in Southern California where the water had dried up, and people had no running water in their houses. They were getting water from tank trucks and hauling it back to their houses in jugs, just like the third world. Most End of Days radio programs are religious in nature, and I'm not religious at all so they don't worry me. I admit to being intrigued , though, with how closely predictions in the bible are paralleling current events. Georgia went through a drought some six years ago that was bad, but at the height of it our creeks were still flowing and the animals were able to get water. My well hit water at less than 100 feet, but I had it drilled down to 278 to insure that future droughts don't effect my water situation here. It's not a guarentee but it's the best I could do. In good times, I have a spring that bubbles up on my land and flows down the mountain, and I have a big 20 foot wide, several feet deep creek flowing through.

      With everything you have going on, I hope you don't have water problems too.

      I like your pictures very much. That's the kind of terrain I always thought I would wind up living in, where you could see for long distances. Instead, here I am in the dense forests of the Blue Ridge.

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  3. Perhaps we've covered this in the past and I imply do not remember it, but have you any interest in amateur radio? For a late-night fella like yourself, I could see you sitting at a desk in front of a radio, headphones on and adult beverage in hand, listening to all the various conversations and dialogs. If nothing else, it would be an interesting way to keep the family in touch.

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    1. I've looked into it, and even attended some classes at the local ham club some years back. However, I can listen with my receivers, and I don't have much of an inclination to talk. Even on the SSB CB I only rarely transmit, primarily I just listen to local conversations to keep abreast of news the paper won't print. It may be something I want to participate in but I haven't really pursued it in awhile.

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  4. During this past winter, Stephen and I were texted back and forth of what frequencies on SW were broadcasting, to see if we were able to copy them with 350 miles of separation and different terrains. With it being cooler, we were able to listen to the same programs. It was fun.

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    1. Listening is a lot of fun. It's something you can do from inside, if the weather is bad. Or, you can sit out on the porch and listen when it's nice out at night. I have a little table on my porch I can set my radio, pipe and drink on. You probably have better reception there than I do because the mountains do cause some terrain masking, especially on ground wave radio signals. The sky wave bounces in pretty well here on the mountain top, but there are higher mountains all around me.

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  5. Hey Harry,

    Yeah' I listen to Coast to Coast radio often when I'm up really late at night.

    It's ironic that yesterday I traded an old XP laptop for a J-pole antenna for my Baofeng UV-5R radio.
    The antenna works really well right now.
    I hope in the future to get a good CB. Maybe on of those fancy Galaxy CB's so I can monitor whats goin on too.

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    1. I listened to a good show last night. But when I went this morning to buy the book the author was talking about, it was way too expensive. I'll wait until it comes out in Kindle version.

      What's up with the Galaxy CB? I need to replace my 30 year old Uniden base station and I've been casting about for a good set. That sounds interesting.

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    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)


      The CB radio I'm talking about is the Galaxy DX-959 40 Channel AM/SSB Mobile CB Radio with Frequency Counter (I cut and pasted all that from amazon.com)

      I got a friend of mine that has one in his pick up truck with a 100 watt amp and a really good antenna and talks to people all over the place, sometimes hundreds of miles away is the signal is propagating the right way.
      I got a friend who is a truck driver and he also has the same radio and he says they are rock solid. This radio is one of the few new things I would own.
      I would keep that old Uniden base radio, however if it works really well and you want to sell it, I may be interested.

      I want old electronics and stuff. The rest of society may move forward, hell' I'm going backwards (I'm sure Kymber would say I really am backwards:)
      The less stuff I have that relies on computers, computer chips and advanced integrated circuitry the better. Its not that I am a worried about EMP or that I want to live a Neolithic life style, its because most of this new stuff is too complex and can be easily damaged and not repairable.
      I can say that new Galaxy radio is rock solid because its designed for big over the road trucks that get banged around every single day.

      I guess I would be a throwback to the early 1970's where cars were carbureted and anyone with half a brain could fix any car in their driveway. Color TV's were a luxury item and most products were made in the USA.
      I also miss the days when there was only one phone in the house and no one called during dinnertime or after ten at night unless it was an emergency. I was a little kid back in the early 70's, but If I recall. People were generally more civil towards each other in society back then.

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    3. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      Almost forgot.

      I ordered a Ka Bar, Becker BK 22 knife from amazon for $70.00. I have a knife, but I need a better knife that can be used more like a camp tool, bushcrafting and what not. I thought about getting a Bowie knife or something more traditional seeing that I like 'old stuff' but I can beat the crap out of this Ka Bar if I had too and I would not feel bad about 'scuffing it up'
      I will test it a little and send you guys a review of sorts.

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    4. CC - i would never call you backwards, nor would i ever call you late to supper! it sounds like you think like me and jam - we are searching high and low all over the island for a decent truck from the 70's...guess what? we can't find anyone willing to part with one because they still work and everyone can still fix them!!! and no one will part with them. they're pretty smart about that stuff up here. but sadly, everyone is glued to their cell phones just like in the city. no one can believe we're not on "the facebook" and wonder where on earth we get our information since we don't have cable to get "the news". it makes me crazy! we, too, wish we could go back to about the 1970's...i don't care what anyone says. people WERE more civil back then. much love captain, always. your friend,
      kymber

      Harry - i love your posts because i love all of the interesting comments that your posts generate. it's always great to learn from someone's post...it's even better when the comments are interesting and informative too! much love to you and yours, always. your friend,
      kymber

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    5. So the Galaxy is not a base unit. Runs off D.C.

      I never throw away old equipment, I use it for backup or for a dedicated purpose.

      Hey, Kymber. I saw the shed J built for your ATV. Nice piece of work.

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  6. If you aren't busy this evening, National Geographic Channel should be premiering a new series LIVE FREE OR DIE, it appears geared to the people who live off grid. Hopefully interesting and entertaining at the same time.

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    1. I hadn't heard anything about that. I appreciate the heads up. I'll set my receiver to tape it.

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  7. Night time in general just seems much more surreal than day time. It much more peaceful, and quiet. I haven't listened to radio at that time. It's usually my 1/2 watch TV, and blog time.

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    1. I'm up almost all night. I usually go to bed around five in the morning, and sleep until 9 or 10. Then I take a nap in the afternoon.

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  8. I'm never up that late anymore, having to get up around 4 AM but I remember listening to some late night radio that was interesting to say the least.

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