“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Kindle

I am laboriously picking this post out on a Kindle DX. I am using it because it is more handy and.much smaller than my Kindle HD.  However, that also makes writing on the little screen harder.  I do have a Blue Tooth keyboard for the Kindles but I don't have access to it right now.
Things go well enough. No overwhelming emergencies, just the normal issues associated with trying to operate and maintain a fully functional survivalist compound in the depths of an impenetrable forest located in mountainous terrain.  And doing so in the Golden Years of our lives. There's that,too.
My daughter is working hard on getting mom and dad out of the bush and into the more
congenial environment of a city.  I will say it does have it's attractions but it's not my style. My wife would move to be nearer my kids in a heartbeat. She has to teach five more years first though to get the maximum benefit from her retirement plan. Who knows.

22 comments:

  1. If I had been smart 30 years ago and had settled somewhere away from city life, I think that even with the joys of the Golden Years, I would be loath to leave.

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    1. I like it here well enough. Sometimes, as has lately been the case, a lot of maintenance issues come up and that can be tiring. My wife says if we lived in a condominium we would just have to pick up the phone if anything went wrong. That does appeal to me once in awhile. Still, the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. If I were living in a condominium right now, I wonder how I would stay occupied?

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  2. My lovely wife has made it clear that there's a 6 month limit on our travelling adventures. That's the maximum she'll be away from the grandkids. If it wasn't for skype I'm sure the time would be shorter.

    A buddy of mine once stated that he had to live far enough out in the country that he could pee off his front porch with nobody complaining. Not a bad guideline.

    Another good friend of mine plans to retire and move near a nice hospital. For him that makes some sort of sense. However, I always wonder that maybe if he'd been living out in the woods as long as I have maybe he wouldn't have as many health problems.

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    1. The hospital thing is an issue. I have to drive for an hour and a half to see anyone but a general practictioner. That gets tedious. I think as you get older, especially past 60, things just start going wrong no matter where you live or what lifestyle you pursued, although obviously dopers and such are going to have more issues than just some old guy.

      I meet the criterion of your buddy with the porch, and I agree that it does make life much simpler not to have to put up with the physical presence of other people anywhere around you.

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  3. I'd like to think I'm only going to leave my place in a box, but I know circumstances change and so do people so I'm realistic.

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    1. Who knows. I had a British friend , another blogger, who moved to a nice little country town in Scotland. They worked hard to make it self sustainable. Then he got really sick, and they were having to travel a long way to get to the medical care he needed. Eventually, she dropped off the net and I have never tried to intrude on her to find out what happened, but I doubt they were able to stay in the little house they worked so hard on.

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  4. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    "Stay were your at"

    In a city you would go 'Coo Coo for Coco Puff's and you could start a new blog called "Crazy Harry's Nuthouse"

    Out where you live, you will longer just because you actually have something to do in keeping up with repairs.
    In the city, you would 'mow your lawn' and go back inside, turn on the TV and quietly get old and die.

    My advice Harry is to get the roof's re-roof in metal so you don't have to climb ladders to fix the shakes after a bad storm and also make fixing things easier by cutting down a few trees so you don't compromise the septic system.

    Find out how to simplify the repairs to make things easier on yourself. Get one of them 'Gator's, mule's, to get the mail' Hell get a damn donkey and ride it down to the mailbox (Do they sell 'Jackass's in Georgia, We got plenty in Texas) I'll send you a damn Jackass from Texas if you want.

    I see on the upper right, I see your to do list.

    Septic system failure do to FOD (Falling Object Debris) That's a big one, I would not expect that to happen again any time soon.

    Front brakes on Jeep. Easy issue to repair.

    25 gallons of Kerosene (What you got a Huey stashed somewhere) I don't if Kerosene is like Jet A, but I guess at some point you will fire up that turbine and with a huge, booming 'Woop, Woop, Woop, throughout the forest you will start 'Barnstorming with a Helo' like those two old guys did in the movie "Second Hand Lions" when they flew the plane into the barn at the beginning.


    Blogger, Flogger, google trash, it ain't never prone to work right. One day some Russian hacker will make google crash!

    Another fuel leak in truck. You know what they say about 'duct tape'

    'If you can't duct it, BLANK it"

    Down here in South Texas, most peoples living room furniture are held together with duct tape. We use duct on tape on everything. Hell' we done got a monopoly on duct tape:)

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    1. I've got all the things in the to do list taken care of, or in the process of being taken care of, CC. I use kerosene space heaters as backup heat sources for the outbuildings. If the power goes out, I can't run enough electric heaters off my generators to heat all that space. So I keep several days worth of kerosene for the heaters. Also, in the big crunch, if it ever comes, I can burn the kerosene in my kerosene lamps.

      The truck problem was a cracked O ring on the damned fuel filter I just put in last August. Cost me $42.00 to get it fixed.

      Hey, I hope you got all the Mosin Nagants you want. I was reading the new Shotgun News at O Dark Thirty this morning, and there was a Mitchel's Mausers add that said the government has banned further imports of the rifle from Russia or the Ukraine until "further notice." I don't know if that is true, but who would know if Mitchel's didn't.

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  5. Harry - From what I have learnt about you since I've been following your blog, you would NOT be happy closer to civilization.

    However, our mutual encroaching golden years will, naturally, dictate all our futures.

    For now, enjoy your golden years free of rules and restrictions... :)

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    1. Yeah, probably not Dani. I've been running around like a chicken with it's head cut off here, trying to get everything in order and repaired as required, but this cold weather (it's 19 degrees outside at 9:30 a.m.) is making it much harder. I thought I was all squared away then a number of things happened in short order I had not anticipated. I'm getting it under control, though.

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  6. I could not see you in the city. I just heard that here in our canyon, one or more black bears got into a survival guy's storage unit, tore it to pieces, ate a lot of food, and left a mound of trash behind. I guess his storage unit was not very secure. I also hear so much about these poor hungry bears. I think they are getting desperate and dangerous.

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    1. Inger, I'm not sure I could survive there either. I told my wife, I need to be in a small town environment where the Sheriff's Department just lectures me and sends me on my way instead of tasering me and hauling me off to jail. From time to time over the years, I've had some interesting moments with people who were doing things I objected to, or who were treating local people badly. I can get away with it here, although I am not favorite of the Sheriff's, because they still listen to common sense. In a city, they just throw you into jail.

      The bears here had a huge bumper crop of acorns. I have never seen so many acorns in my life. I am sure they all went to their hibernation places fat and ready for winter. I know out there, with the drought, both animals and humans are getting desperate. None of my spaces that are heated are vulnerable to bear intrusion, they are all built of cedar log and have no windows on the ground floor. However, bears could get into the barn, though I doubt they would find chicken feed much to their taste.

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  7. Harry, Anonymous nailed it! "In the city, you would mow your lawn, go back inside, turn on the TV and quietly get old and die."
    I really miss our home and five acres of woods in Georgia. Here in Mid-Tn, we live in a neighborhood, a big mistake! Now, I'm too old to move, guess my next move will be to the cemetery! Enjoy where you are at, as long as you can.

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    1. Scooney, that's CC (Captain Crunch) down in Texas. He has a nice place right near the beach. He was on the U.S.S. Puget Sound when he was in the Navy, which was the flag ship of Sixth Fleet when I was in Lebanon. I spent some time on the ship on Admiral Martin's staff.

      I don't think a neighborhood would work for me. My wife and I are in the process of figuring out where to live in retirement. I think I want to stay here, she wants to go to a condo in Palm Coast, or if the kids move somewhere else, she wants to live near them. I don't know what we will do.

      I feel like I'm too old to move, too. It would be an absolute logistical nightmare to try to move off this mountain top. I always counted on my kids living nearby, and just handing the property over to them, when we couldn't keep it maintained anymore. When they moved off it really scuppered my plans.

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  8. i'm too old an money-free to live differently now. also we do need to be fairly close to a hospital.
    stay where you are while able and by the time your wife reties there is no telling what chances will have happened.
    deb h.

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    1. We've got five years to work it all out.

      Don't feel like the Lone Ranger. There are a lot of people that the events of 2007-2008 lightened considerably in the financial department.

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  9. Your place could certainly be made easier to maintain. Whoever said metal roof made an excellent point. You up alone on that roof when the Mrs is gone worries me. A metal roof would be almost maintenance free and last the rest of your life. Also there is a fire benefit.

    Pushing the woods back some would help also.

    Something I have long thought of is that the survivalist retreat way out in the hinterboonies is not realistic for aging. My thought is that a normaliish (well wood stove, basement, room to garden, few if any rules so you could have chickens, etc) in or near a small town and a cabin out in the woods might just make more sense. There are certainly weak points but you would have options and as you age then maybe the cabin could be used less (or more by kids, etc) and if need be you could just transition to the town house which is reasonably near decent hospitals, etc.

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    1. I never gave a thought to old age when I moved here. I was 32, just out of the Marine Corps, and in tip top condition. If I had thought long term, I damn sure wouldn't have had multiple story buildings, I wouldn't have had shake roofs, I wouldn't have had railroad tie retaining walls. But I just didn't think about what would happen when I was in my mid sixties.

      I do plan to put on metal roofs, but that's a summer job. I can do it myself. My wife helped me with the metal roof on the main house porch, but I'm not letting her up on the steeper house roofs. I can handle that, as long as my hip and knees hold out.

      I wanted to be self sufficient, and I did not want to displace in an emergency. I had seen enough of what chaos in a society does when I was overseas, and I didn't want to be out in that . I just envisioned myself with everything I needed, snug and isolated, and that's what I built. I did not envision myself with my kids moved off, my knees and hip shot, or any of the other issues old age has gifted me with.

      If I was a plains indian, I'd do the "stake yourself out" gig where you put a stake in the ground at the site of a battle, tie your foot to it with a little piece of symbolic rope, and go out in a swirl of glory. The Indians had it right, that's a hell of a lot better than laying in a hospital bed, snoring with your mouth open and wetting yourself, which seems to be the way most of us go these days.

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  10. If it's a slow Sunday, here's some reading. You once mentioned your Camp 45, and the guys at Marlin Owners know a good bit about them.
    A 21-pound Wolff spring and a new buffer, and you'll be good for several decades.

    I had a Camp 9 at one time, and sometimes I wish I still had it.
    But I traded it for a lever-action 44, which I like better anyway.

    And please forgive me for trying to give advice to a guy who has put as many rounds downrange as you probably have.


    http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/camp-stickies-faq/
    http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/camp-carbines-9-45/


    - Charlie

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    1. I actually don't know Jack Doodley about commercial weapons, Charlie. I get most of what I know from other bloggers. My "speciality" is old military weapons from about 1891 to 1945. That's a rapidly disappearing segment of the gun owning population, as collectors get older and the supply of product dries up. I appreciate the heads up. I think it was Commander Zero who gave me some good gouge on replacing the springs too, and I can always use good advice.

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  11. In 5 years you may change your mind - or you may not.

    So you have a Kindle. I'm looking into getting some kind of device for the boys. I was looking into getting a Kindle Fire. They need something to play their educational games on. I just am at a loss as to what I should get.

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    1. I wouldn't get a Kindle, Alissa. I don't really like either of mine. The operating system crashes a lot, especially on the net. Their browser is terrible and they have the things set up so you can't just download a browser like Firefox.

      I got them because they offer some magazines I wanted that nobody else does.

      I'm not sure what to recommend, but I have a couple of acquaintances who do have small kids, I'll ask them and email you.

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