“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Thursday, December 4, 2014

Leisurely Thursday

Leisurely is the right word for it.  I've just been working on this and that, catching up on things. It's very heavily overcast outside right now, but also very warm with a current temperature at around 65 degrees.  Not bad at all.

  With the leaves off the trees, I have a good view of the mountains from the front porch.  You can see a long way out there.  Since I live on the border of the national forest, I'm blessed with views that do not include other peoples houses or lights off in the distance.

The stream down from the porch is running full tilt, we had plenty of rain this summer so it's up fairly high. At night I enjoy sitting on the porch swing and listening to it running down the mountain.

There's never a moment in anyone's lives when they aren't dealing with some kind of problem. Where you place in the socio-economic strata "don't signify" as they say up here. Top or bottom or in between, everybody has to deal with life. Everybody is a survivalist, if not in the sense of preparing for the future then certainly in that aspect of life that requires you to constantly be fielding problems. It's easier to deal with those problems up here in the quiet and solitude. I've been here a long time and experienced pretty much the whole gamut of what life can throw at you.  I think if I'd been living in an apartment in a city, I might not have come through all that as fortunately as I did. Your environment does make a big difference in your resiliency.



This is a new magazine. It's put out by the same people who publish the new "American Survival Guide."

When they say "Military Surplus" that's what they mean. I has some good articles on the old guns, but they are not the specific focus of the publication. There's also a lot on just plain old military surplus gear, who sells it, where they get it, etc. I thought that was interesting and recognized some of the names like Major Surplus and Survival.

It has an article on current military handguns that was well written and interesting, although I don't see exactly how it fits into a surplus magazine. I paid $8.00 for the magazine at the grocery store in town, and got my money's worth. If it shows up near you it isn't a bad read for the price.






  The new CDNN catalog was in the mailbox yesterday.  As always, it's full of good shooting accessories and firearms. I don't see how they can publish a slick catalog like this four times a year and give it out for free, but they do.

I've bought a lot of magazines and the like from them and gotten good service. They tend to have items nobody else is offering , like Korean manufacture Glock mags back during the William the Bastards gun ban.

You can download the catalog from their web page , or ask for the paper catalog, or do both.

I keep these catalogs as a price indexing reference, to help me quantify what items cost at different time periods.  The price fluctuations are amazing over time.


CDNN

16 comments:

  1. Harry,

    Hey there, thanks for the information regarding Military Surplus magazine. I'll mention it to hubby, he's all into military stuff and guns :-) It's been a while since we went into town to visit the army surplus store, we may need to take a field trip over the weekend to see if they've added new items.

    This kind of weather is great for piddling around in the cabin (house), and sometimes working outside on the property. Since all the winds came through and rain they're are no more leaves on the tree's here making it a bit easier to cut down branches to stack for future firewood.

    Our visiting squirrel is happy, I've put out a salt lick and a few raw peanuts. It didn't take him long to clear out the nuts and enjoy the salt. At least he's no long licking the screen on the bathroom window.

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    1. Sandy, I'm sure the squirrel appreciates the peanuts and salt. We have gray squirrels and flying squirrels here, but they don't come very close to the house because of all the cats.

      I've got wind blown branches and limbs stacked up too. I have to clean them up anyway, so I burn them in my outdoor fire rings. That gets rid of them and lets me have a fire outside when I want one.

      I thought that was an interesting magazine. I've never seen one that was oriented towards surplus in general, and the magazines about surplus guns are going out of publications, one by one, as the surplus market is choked off by the government and the lack of new sources of firearms. I don't know if it is a one off special, or the first in a quarterly publication.

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  2. CDNN is a darn good company. The one time I needed to call customer service the person who picked up the phone was a gun person and told me how to solve the problem yet still offered to take them back. Also I've ordered from them many times and they were all as offered and delivered in a very fair amount of time.

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    1. I've been buying from them for years and have no complaints. I like the fact that they can find almost any kind of magazine, and they get products no one else offers. Their catalog is a class publication as well.

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  3. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    I admire your 'quiet and solitude'

    I'm torn between the beach and the desert.

    I love both. I enjoy the solitude of the desert but I also enjoy the fun of the beach. I can still get some solitude on the beach with a little effort and the proper timing. I also have an excellent beach house (that's near the beach, but not on it) I was considering building an apartment in the backyard. Maybe about 400 to 500 square feet and building it to be very hurricane resistant. I would call it, my 'Beach Bunker"
    Now what would be cool is to have one of them fortifications the Nazi's had on the coast of Normandy.
    Now that would be hurricane proof!
    'Don't get me wrong, I hate Nazi's but I gotta admire their engineering.

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    1. CC, I make a distinction between "Nazis" and "Germans" of that period. Everybody may have had to join the party to survive, but a lot of them were far from being sympathizers. I've seen the German fortifications along the beach near Naples, they were stout but not very comfortable.

      I wonder if it's possible to build a hurricane proof house near the beach. You could make it strong enough to withstand the wind but could you do anything about storm surge?

      I like the desert too. It would be nice to have a place in the desert, one at the beach and one in the mountains. But I guess you'd have to be Bill Gates to pull that off.

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    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      On the hurricane resistant houses (no such thing as hurricane proof) ones with concrete walls that are being built now. The walls are all pre-fab and built off site and trucked in and put together like an erector set using a crane.
      Storm surge and wind is the issue here as with your place, forest fires are the issue.
      No matter where you go, somethings and issue somehow.

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    3. If someone could invent a dwelling that could resist any kind of natural disaster, I'd sure buy one. I'd invest in the company, too!

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  4. The guns on that sheet look very cheap to my eyes!

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    1. Kev, prices have come down some lately. I keep all the CDNN catalogs to help me follow price increases, and you would be amazed how inexpensive good firearms were back ten years ago. It's not so much a rise in the cost of production as it is creeping inflation here.

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  5. It's true, everyone has their own day to day battles. Some are just more resilient than others in how they handle their hassles.

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    1. I think it's important to set about anything that comes up , immediately. Putting things off means that problems start to pile up and that can be overwhelming. My son sometimes does this , but we are working on correcting that.

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  6. I agree it is so much easier to deal with problems living in a quiet place. Noise and other distractions make it more difficult to both focus and cope, I think. And I too am happy to not have any lights or neighbors to deal with.

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  7. I'm sure, from personal experience, that a quiet, secluded place to live helps deal with stress. You have all that beautiful terrain to walk in, it's perfect for morning and evening walks, and what could help more with handling stress? I know you've been going through a lot out there, and dealing with it very courageously if I may say so.

    No neighbors is great, because you don't have to adjust your life style to suit theirs. Even the very nicest people are going to be different in some respect than you are. I remember reading, years ago, about a fellow who lived in the Arizona desert. He enjoyed the starry nights. Then someone built a house next to his property, and they put yard lights and pole lights all over their property. No more good night views for him, the light pollution was terrible. I felt badly for the guy, and still remember his article .

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  8. I find it better to deal with my problems. If I don't they add up, and I then want to blow up. Usually I'm a mellow person. You don't want to piss me off over and over again. I may be apt to blow.

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    1. That's my philosophy. I try to prioritize, plan ahead, and then make rational decisions to address whatever the current panic de jure is. I get tired of always having to deal with things though. I forget which Greek playwright wrote in one of his plays "only the dead have seen the end of woe."

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