“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”

― Frank Herbert

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Post Apocalyptic Fiction by Deborah Moore



 Deborah Moore has been a "prepper" for quite awhile. She's  been associated with SurvivalWeekly.com for a long time, and is a friend of Jim Cobb,  a noted author of  useful prepper books .  Ms. Moore lived in the deep forest, completely off grid, for many years and her experience shows in the realism of her story line.

The Journal: Cracked Earth traces events in a small town after the New Madrid Fault becomes active, causing serious disruptions throughout the country, and a temporary breakdown of the social infrastructure.

The book is written entirely from the perspective of the female protagonist,  a rural woman who lives by herself and takes care of herself, but is plagued by loneliness and the difficulties of managing her largely self sufficient compound single handed.

Bearing in mind that these books started out as serialized fiction on a blog, and were intended to be training aids, her writing is actually very good and the story retains a readers attention.  The books tend to deal more with the issues women are concerned with, so there are no barbarian hordes swarming across the countryside, and far less of the violent action that most novels for men feature.  Rather, it's a kind of how to do story, featuring a lot of recipes for meals I could have done without, and a great deal of introspective reflection by the main character on men, relationships, security of the family, et al.  All of these are important, but they don't make for exciting reading. Even so, the story is good enough to keep you reading and an individual  who pays attention can't help but come away with some valuable information. I've had chickens for 16 years and I still learned a few things about chickens and egg production from Moore's story line.



Ash Fall picks up where Cracked Earth ended.  It details the further adventures of the primary character in the first novel, as well as the ancillary characters who appeared as the story developed.

The books are both concerned with tectonic shifting and the havoc earthquake and volcanoes consequently inflict on the North American continent.  A third book is in the wings, and I'm looking forward to reading that.

These novels have been published in both print and kindle editions. The reviews from those who purchased the first two novels have been overwhelmingly favorable, and I tend to lean that way myself.  With the advent of self publishing at virtually no cost via Kindle style books, there's a lot of post apocalyptic fiction out there and most of it is pretty terrible. These two works were written by a person who knows her topic intimately, and the editing is excellent, which prevents those aggravating errors that so detract from an otherwise good story.

Neither the Kindle edition nor the print edition are particularly cheap, but you're getting two things for your money. One is a good, entertaining read.  Women will particularly enjoy the books because they were basically written by a woman for women.  The other is some very specialized knowledge that will come in handy for anyone of the survivalist or prepper mind set.  In reading these two books, the protagonist reminded me of several women I've met through blogging over the years, and somehow that made the story even more credible.  They're worth the money.

18 comments:

  1. This definitely sounds like the sort of story I'd enjoy reading. I will have to look for it.

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    1. Lisa, I know you go to the library a lot, maybe they can inter-library transfer them for you. They're relatively expensive in print. I bought the Kindle editions, as I do with almost all books now, and even they were much more than I usually pay. I think you would like the two novels. Especially as you live a similar lifestyle yourself in terms of a rural existence.

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  2. Thank you sir for your review. Good prep conscious fiction is always welcome here. I have not heard of this author and a Barnes & Noble gift card in hand - makes lots of sense..

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    1. I hope you enjoy the books. They are not "exciting" and there isn't much action in them, but on the other hand they are probably one of the most realistic attempts to define what things might be like in the event of a societal collapse I've read. More "drudge" and less "drama." Much good information of a practical nature in both books.

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  3. Thanks - they definitely sound worthy of reading. Will look out for them :)

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    1. Dani, I have no idea how the situation is in South Africa in terms of book stores, but I know you can get them as Kindle books. I just don't know if you use a Kindle!

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  4. Something good to read, thanks. Check your email, Harry.

    Matt

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    1. Matt, I got your email and have answered it. Good to hear from you.

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  5. They both look like they'd be good books. I'll have to check them out at the library.

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  6. I think you will enjoy them. Maybe a little quiet time and a good book will be relaxing. I always find reading to be useful escapism when things get a trifle tense.

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  7. These are not self published. They are currently put out by Permuted Press which specializes in apocalyptic fiction - particularly of the zombie type.

    Permuted Press has stated that they are going to limit the books that they offer in hard copy - even print on demand - to only their very top sellers.

    The value of Permuted Press is that they don't have the level of typos and major miscues that most of the self help books have.

    The book has a lot of reviews with "verified purchase" on Amazon. Not all are positive, but the fact that the reviews are by people who but the book is somewhat unusual. Most of the folks who like it seem to like it for its prepper's advice and its realism.

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    1. Since they are published in paper as well, I figured there had to be someone besides the author out there. Most novels of this sort are , I believe, self published these days with all the inherent issues that entails. Permuted Press did a good job on these books. The editing wasn't perfet but it was better than what you usually see.
      I actually prefer more blood and thunder in my books, and less navel gazing and comptemplation than I found in Moores' books, but you put your finger right on the value, there's lots of actionable information. Also, every other word is not vulgar, which make for a refreshing change,

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  8. Hey Harry,


    (captaincrunch)


    I got one that will 'knock your socks off Harry'

    Its a link from Western Rifles Shooters Associantion's blog on how it would take 'one nuke' to stop Islam and end its fourteen hundred year era of terror.
    It was written by Matt Bracken too (former Navy Seal)

    http://www.amnation.com/vfr/archives/023326.html

    The premise was that if Israel got nuked by Iran or if Russia, India or some other country that flat out does not give a damn about Islam (or political correctness) nuked 'that rock in medina' that the muslims worship five times a day that Islam may got extinct.

    I have considered all the possible counterstrikes that Israel could pull off if they were being 'nuked out of existance' and not once have I considered that they would 'vaporize' and leave a massive radioactive hole where the source of Islam resides.
    You would think that Iran's leaders and some of the other muslim leaders would figure this out and realize co-existence and some kinda long term peace would be in their best interest seeing how they have everything to lose.

    Matt Bracken said that we live in interesting times at the end of the article. Yeah' interesting times indeed.

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    1. Any time you have a country run by a theocracy, common sense goes out the window. Anyone can justify anything by saying God told them to do it and one must not question God.

      The problem with cutting loose with nuclear weapons is that nobody can predict how it might go or if and when it might end. When loose cannons like Pakistan, Iran, and North Korea have the bomb, nobody in the world is safe. Israel has a stable, secular leadership but I am pretty sure they wouldn't sit back and allow themselves to be eradicated so as not to inconvenience the rest of the world, which they know detests them anyway. Someday, somewhere, one of those things will get loose and it will be like a chain of firecrackers, you light the first one and the rest just go off on their own accord.

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  9. I wanted to get the boys some kind of tech device. I was thinking a Kindle Fire for next Christmas. Then they can get on the internet (monitored), play kids learning games, and read books. There's a lot of fun kid apps. We'll see how things go.

    Then I can read books you post to.

    We're not moving out of the area. My parents are such a big help. My husband will find things. He's got 2 little jobs, he just needs to find one more. For now he's applied for unemployment. Luckily we've survived before on mostly my income. It just sucks because I'm $3,000 short of paying off a huge loan - student loan. I so wanted to just pay $1,000 a month to get that sucker gone.

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    1. Alissa, the Kindles are pretty good pieces of gear and they are coming down in price all the time. I have the original "HD" and an "HDX"

      I can understand staying where you are. There are so many interesting things to do for your kids, for one thing. I hope your husband finds something soon, so you can both not worry about it. Uncertainty is tough to deal with, but as you say, you can live off one income in the interim. My wife has a student loan. Have you been following the debate about restructuring student loans to reduce the impact on people. I have saved a couple of news web pages I can send you if you would like to see them.

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  10. I bought the 2nd book (1st was not in stock) and it was awesome. Good writing - thanks for writing this.

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    1. I'm glad you enjoyed it. There is supposed to be a third book out soon. I will be looking for it and will pass the word when it's available.

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