“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

For all the women who like to post food pictures.




I usually just put a link to interesting news articles over in a column on the right side of the blog. But in this case, I am giving the link it's own post.

It's a photo series on "doomsday" meals prepared by people who starred in the National Geographic Doomsday Prepper Series.

I thought it was interesting, so I am posting the link here for the edification of all, though I think mostly the ladies will like it.  I read blogs from the U.S., Canada, England, Australia, South Africa, Scotland and other countries where the bloggers are women who grow vast amounts of food in their own gardens, and then post pictures of the great meals they make with what they have on hand. I always enjoy those posts, and I have tried to make some of the things I've seen there, with varying results. I'm not much of a cook, and I'm no gardener at all.

Doomsday Prepper Meals





23 comments:

  1. I loved it. This was pretty awesome. Thanks for sharing :)

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  2. I thought it was interesting. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

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  3. We had a garden last year. This year we're having a bigger garden.

    I do think things would go crazy if food ran out.

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    1. I know you are a big gardener and a great cook. I am going to try a serious garden this year, even if my experiment last year got washed away. It's one of the big shortfalls I have in sustainability for living up here. When I went to get my seed stash when I planted those growing boxes, the mice had gotten in and eaten up the seeds!

      People will do what they have to do to get food for themselves and their families. If it involved taking it from others, some would feel guilty and some would not, but they would still do it.

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  4. Harry - if there are seeds that you are interested in - let me know! i have a varied bunch of seeds, probably as many seeds as you have weapons! if you have specific seed types that you are interested in growing - send me an email and i can get you some seeds. or if you prefer, i can send you a list of all of the seeds that we have...most of which are 2nd, 3rd, 4th, fifth and 6th generation that i have saved from proven plants...you can have a look at the list and then let me know what you are interested in. much love to you and yours always! your friend,

    kymber

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    1. Kymber, I am going to raise corn, potatoes, and beans. I can get all those seeds and plantings at the farmers depot. If there is something you think I ought to try as well, let me know. I want to start out with just a few things so I don't work myself to death. It gets really hot here in the summer, so I will only be working in my garden early in the morning and late in the evening. Thanks for the seed offer, if you think there is something I really should try and you don't think I can get it here, send me some seeds and I will work them into the garden.

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  5. Fascinating. What was even more interesting were their reasons - from financial collapse due to the Chinese, to volcanoes - by a New York Fireman.

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    1. Doomsday Preppers makes the people choose one issue, for editing purposes more than anything else. Most people just prepare for a duration, rather than a cause, since so many things can happen. Often people think if you are eating food from long term storage it has to be nasty, but that's not the case at all. Meals we make from our own long term storage are just as good as we make with grocery store ingredients.

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  6. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Been up all night, cant sleep.

    I guess its because there has not been any sunlight in a week down here in South Texas.
    I got insomnia from hell!

    I did bills and other crap. I even counted flowers on the wall and played solitaire with a deck of 51.

    As per all the obese power chair warriors at walmarts going bonkers over baloney during blizzards, blackouts or black Fridays.

    That's fine, let them feed on each other.

    As per seeds and stuff. If someone has a really good garden, animals that are edible and supplies. They are a lot better off than most of us. Self Sufficent rural folks will be the big winners in the long run.

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    1. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      Update!

      I got two hours of sleep....Yippee

      I'm ready to break ice with my surfboard (Icebreaker duty) in the great lakes.

      This winter has really, really sucked so far and it ain't over yet. No sun in South Texas and I would not be surprised is Spring Break was changed over to Spring Blizzard or Spring Bust for the business owners.

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    2. Winter seems to be over here, unless it comes roaring back. You might try melatonine, I use it and it works for me. Also magnesium. You can get both at any pharmacy.

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  7. We grow our potatos in potato towers although we have never gotten super serious about it, you can google potato tower or grow 100 lbs of potatoes in a tower. They are easy to dig into and pull out what you want then leave the rest for another day. We couldn't grow anything without raised beds, being on all rock. Then we layer cardboard and newspaper down, then leaves, twigs, compost, dirt and manure, either cow or if it's aged a year or so, horse from the horse farm down the road. Everything grows. I use Botanical Interest seeds, heirloom so not as disease resistant; however, that won't prevent the deer from feasting. We put up stakes and used fishing line to surround the beds. The deer run into the line, can't see it, get spooked and leave. The drawback is that we too forget and run into it and then have to resstring. Hope you are successful with the garden. Even if you have other food options it's essential to at least experiment and figure out how to grow in your area.

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    1. I plan to beef up my capabilities, which are zilch at this moment, in the area of gardening. I don't have much to make towers out of, our soil is red clay and very flinty. I did try to use bagged growing soil last spring and that's what washed right out of the raised beds in a torrential rain storm. My dogs should keep the deer away, though I do see deer in the meadow sometimes just at dawn.

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  8. Off and on I do test out meals that could be prepper meals. I have several based on pantry ingredients that I like. They came in handy during the two weeks I couldn't get my car up the driveway due to snow.

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    1. I knew you did some experimenting that way, and your cooking skills must come in really handy when you are trying to decide what to make from what's on hand. I basically use several cook books, all of which specifically deal with cooking using long term storage supplies. I opened up a 15 year old pail of white flour this week and it was spoiled. I have never had that happen, and I can only surmise that the mylar bag leaked somehow inside the pail. We didn't like the biscuits we made with it, but the dogs did so we will use it up making biscuits for them.

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  9. Harry,

    We always makes sure we have preps on hand because weather and emergencies are always happening here. Tornado season is coming to play soon for us, and you know what happened here last year. Several massive tornadoes wiping out towns. Grocery store shelves were gone through or empty.

    I rotate my long term storage (i.e. flour, sugar, oatmeal, rice, pasta, ect) and replace it with recently purchased items. Repack my 5 gallon buckets with the recently purchased items, add oxygen absorbers to the Mylar bags, and heat close the top of the Mylar bag with a hand held hair straightener, then reseal the 5 gallon bucket and store in a dark cool spot.

    We have extended our garden and will be planting more seeds in hopes of storing and eating all the food produced.

    I say give planting corn, potatoes, and beans a shot. You'll enjoy receiving a bountiful harvest. Be careful.....corn and potatoes don't like the extreme heat.
    I've found if you research your local cooperative or extension office they usually will provide a list of what type of vegetables and fruits will grow in your area. They will also provide a suggestion on when as far as date to start planting your seeds.

    Good luck with planting :-)

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    1. Sandy, I rotate my food supplies too, but in 1999 I bought an entire 18 wheeler load of food in number 10 cans and in food storage pails. The pails were packed with nitrogen flushed Mylar bags of food. Even with the kids home it was hard to work through all that food and when they left for school in Vancouver we hadn't made a dent in it. Fortunately we have had very little spoilage. Some powdered milk, some corn meal, and now this white flour. In every case, however, we were able to use the food as animal feed for one species or the other.

      I worry about running out of food more than just about any other threat, given the remoteness of my location.

      I will check with the county agent and see what he may have. When I came here this was a farming community but now it's a retirement center. Our tax money is spent accordingly.

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  10. Harry,

    Last year we planted the garden using seeds we bought at the Home Depot. It didn't go well. In fact, it was terrible. Only the radishes did well and nobody else in the fam likes em but me. So this year we went to the local preparedness expo and bought a bunch of locally grown seeds. Supposedly more in line with our weather conditions. I will let you know how that goes.

    I've said this before and I'll say it again...not looking forward to the weeding --Troy

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    1. Troy, there are still a lot of natives here, mostly octogenarian, who plant gardens. I see pole beans, squash, pumpkins, and different varieties of corn.I am sure people are planting onions, tomatoes,peppers, and other vegetables because I see them for sale at the county farmers market in season.

      I like radishes a lot. Especially with cheese. I will be interested in hearing how your gardening works out.

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  11. Radishes are easy to grow; I like them too with salt and olive oil.

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  12. Yael, that sounds pretty good. I bet cauliflower would taste good with salt and olive oil too. I'll have to try it out.

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  13. Very interesting. Some of the photos remind me of when we first started prepping for Y2K and realizing we'd actually have to eat the stuff if it came to that. There's something to be said for trying to store food one can live with. I do think folks would steal that cat food if they were hungry enough!

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    1. Given what people have done historically during food shortages, up to and including eating each other, I think it's a good bet that hungry people will not scruple to do what it takes to feed themselves and their families.

      I always remember the scene in "The Day After" when the farmer comes home, and a family is sitting around a fire in his pasture cooking one of his cows. The farmer says , in a bewildered tone of voice, something to the effect that "you can't do that, this is my home." Whereupon a man picks up a gun, shoots him, and goes back to munching on a beef joint.

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