“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Saturday, March 7, 2015

Saturday


The latest issue of American Survival Guide is out. This one focuses on bushcraft and the "bushcraft lifestyle."  I'm not much interested in that . I may need to go out into the forest but I come back before nightfall.  Bushcraft people are concerned with living full time in the woods, desert, mountains, or whatever environment. They focus on the rock bottom minimum of equipment, or making your own. They are not quite "primitive livers" but are a sort of in between lifestyle.

The bushcraft lifestyle really started in Australia in the 1960's, and most of the current day guru's of that philosophy are Australians.  In general, they don't believe in pre-established retreats, or in stockpiling. Rather, they try to hone a set of primitive living skills that will let them live a nomadic existence way out there in the wilderness. They tend not to acquire more than they can carry, and they look for sustainability through the ability to hunt for food, harvest natural plant resources, and build or maintain their own equipment.

Obviously you have to be a fairly tough individual to live that way, and you have to be physically fit. The bushcraft crowd does not lean towards families, or even towards having women along as far as I can tell. Most of them are hyper masculine type A personalities with a "go it alone" philosophy. I don't really recall ever reading about one who planned to do anything but live in the bush on his lonesome. Of course, it's possible that's the only bush crafter type who writes, so who knows. It's not for me, but whatever suits the individual. I'll leave them alone if they'll leave me alone.



Someone sent me this catalog of oil and electric lamps and lanterns. I don't know who, because with typical concern for the mail, the post office ripped the corner of the envelope that had the return address on it, and part of it was missing. So whoever it was that sent this my way, thanks. I appreciate it.  These people have some beautiful things, and the goods are functional as well. I buy from Lehman's once in awhile, and this catalog reminded me of the Lehman's catalog.  I do keep kerosene lamps in my storeroom, but I have largely replaced them as a first line back up to electricity with LED lanterns. Less of a fire danger. However, if some event occurred that disrupted life long enough, I suppose even my prodigious supply of batteries would eventually fail, and I would have to go back to candles and kerosene lamps.


I got my new Emergency Essentials catalog, and I had a small shopping list for them, but it will have to wait. Instead, I've put my available "preparedness money" from this months budget into ammo. I hope the Dark Lord will not get away with banning a common type of 5.56 ammo by executive order, as he is trying to do, but just in case I bought more.


Do  I really need more? No.   Am I sure Obama and his ATF will be successful in banning the ammo? No.   But there's a strong streak of the lemming in me.  Everybody else is buying the stuff like it was going out of style, so I better buy it too!



Anyway, like Kipling said,  you can never have too much ammo.  I always remember how much travail the protagonist of "The Road" went through, simply because he was down to two rounds.....



34 comments:

  1. Harry - Not sure if you store the LED lights with the batteries installed. I've heard that doing that shortens the life of the batteries. What are your thoughts on rechargable batteries - with a small solar battery charger you could ensure your battery supply for longer :)

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    1. Dani, I store my batteries in a refrigerator. In the 1970's and 1980's, that was a common practice in the Marine Corps. I have since seen articles that say it is a bad idea, but I put practical experience of which I have first hand knowledge over something on a news web page, so I still do it. I bought a set of rechargeable batteries and a solar power charger a year or so ago. It came highly recommended by a fellow who knows his stuff. But for me, it didn't work very well. So now I just store a heck of a lot of batteries of all sorts.I use in a dedicated refrigerator, and as I use them I rotate them. I also have some rechargeable batteries that I can recharge using the wall socket. As long as I have fuel for my generator, I will be able to recharge those. I haven't given up on the solar power process, but I think I need to spend a little more money and buy a good system. I only paid $67.00 for my first attempt and it just wasn't reliable.

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    2. Harry - Dani is right about not storing the lights or other equipment with the batteries installed. jam has an elaborate "charging" system in that he charges the batteries, checks on them several times over the course of an hour or two and as soon as they are charged, he removes them from the charger and stores them in a cool, dark place in our basement. whenever he uses the batteries on a piece of equipment, he removes the battery when finished and then immediately charges it (and checks on it).

      i think that you would be incredibly impressed with his drafts of how to set up a wind-power system here. for some reason, the person who lived here before us left a ginormic satellite tower-thingy(?) and as we have wind of at least 10mph daily...and for extended periods of time, winds of up to 90-100kms - he is now really looking into setting us up with a wind power system. we thought about going solar but there are just too many rainy, grey days here throughout the year and he has always been interested in wind and hydro power. just thought i would share. much love always, my friend!

      your friend,
      kymber

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    3. oh forgot to say that when i was in the military we always stored all of our batteries in the regridgerator.

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    4. Kymber, I think wind power works great for people who have a fairly constant breeze blowing. Alas, here we seem to have either no wind, or a gale force wind. I've tried jus about everything except hydroelectric, which is probably what I should have tried first as we have a good stream with a constant flow going.

      I don't store equipment with batteries in it for fear of corrosion. For instance, I have a 12 pack of NATO L shaped flashlights down in one of the store rooms. I put batteries in them to check them out before they went into storage, and once tested I took the batteries out again. I agree with you and Dani that storing something long term with batteries in it would be unwise.

      I'm trying to think who I know who uses wind power. I absolutely know someone who does, and I can't remember who it is. I'm sure you two can put a system together if you decide to, because J is so good with improvisation.

      Good to hear from you up there. I liked the pictures of the snowy scenery you posted.

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    5. Hey Harry and Kymber,

      (captaincrunch)

      When the lights go out I will paddle my surfboard out with a harpoon and start whaling for lamp oil etc. (Moby Dick ain't got nothin' on me, I'm a Texan)

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  2. As the wise man says, "Unless you're on fire, there is no such thing as too much ammo or fuel".

    Didja see that, apparently, ATF's rulebook, which was printed in Januray, already has the exemption for M855 removed? This would indicate that the 'public comment' period and whatnot is completely for show.

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    1. I read an article on the issue which made that point. I am hopeful with so many members of the House raising hell about this, that Obama will back off ,but so far he hasn't shown any more regard for their opinions than he does for that of the common citizen, so I am not banking on any changes to his declared intent. It seems like that slug just wants to sign as many executive orders as he can , without concern for what they may deal with. I only have three weapons that chamber the 5.56, two AR-15's and a Ruger Mini 14. I have about 5000 loaded rounds, and the components to crank out about 3 times that, so even if the worst happens I should be ok. I have invested most heavily in 8mm mauser and 7.62X39. I'd be embarrassed to tell you how much of that I have stashed, but I can say with confidence if there is ever a forest fire up here, when it gets to this place people will think a super volcano has erupted.

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  3. Even crappy steel cased 7.62x39 is flying off the shelves up here. As I am not in to the whole tacticool thing I've been thinking of a Mini 30 Ranch Rifle lately. But they are getting top $ for those around here. Looked around locally at SKS as a possible alternative but they were topping 500$ here and there is no way I am paying that kind of money for Chinese stamped steel. It will all have to wait anyhow as I need to buy a new transmission for the Dodge this week. The old Win 30-30 will do for now.

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    1. I feel dizzy when I think what guns are going for these days. I bought Chinese SKS rifles for under $100, unissued with all the accouterments in the 1980's. I bought many (and I mean, MANY) cases of Norinco 7.62X39 copper washed cased, fmj, non reloadable, 1200 round to the case, for $125.00 a case. If I bought two cases I got them for $100.00 a case. Even in the mid 1990's, primo Yugoslavian brass cased 7.62X39 on stripper clips, in the spam cans, in the wooden case was about $150.00 delivered for 900 rounds. Of course, money bought more then, but even so, the prices today seem obscene. Same with handguns. Prices on a good M1911 have about doubled since the mid 80's.

      A Winchester 30 30 has nothing wrong with it. Fine self defense rifle. I have two of them , even if I never shoot them.

      Having lived overseas for so many years, in some of the worlds locations the Romans would have dubbed "Anus Orbis", I'm a big believer in being able to shoot my way out of unpleasant situations. When I'm gone, I want my kids to have that capability, and with the current pseudo-fascist regime and those likely to follow it, I believe in buy now or cry later. But as you say, a man's money has to cover a wide spectrum of needs, and preparedness is like the defense budget, you can't spend every dime there and nothing on transportation.

      I had a new transmission and engine put in a 1984 Grand Wagoneer I had . Then I learned to my dismay that everything else in the vehicle, like the ball joints, was worn out too. I hope you have better luck with that than I did.

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  4. Thank you so much for commenting on my blog. I was in the Israeli army when I was 18, long time ago. Now days I hardly survive blogland with all the trols who hate Israel and I get so scared when they are around my blog, (I called Michael from the above comment to help me the last time), I am so glad to find your blog and know that there are some people in blogland that I can trast:)

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    1. Yael, you are always welcome here. I was in Lebanon, 1982-1983 during Peace for Galilee and saw what Israel was dealing with first hand. I was a strong supporter of Israel prior to that but after my experiences there in Lebanon I became a true believer, in every sense of the word.

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    2. Harry - i am glad to see yael commenting here and hope that he comes back to read your comment back to him, and my comment to both of you. yael, you have many friends in mighty small places but people like Harry are BIG people to have on your side and we are all full of understanding and support. please visit often as we in north america are very interested in your point of view. Harry has friends from all over the world and we all congregate here to share our thoughts, ideas and points of view. adding another to the mix (you) just makes the conversation even better.

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    3. Kymber, Yael is a girl's name. ; - )

      I'm sure she will appreciate the warmth of your comment though. Most Israelis I know pretty much gave up on unrestricted blogging because they got flooded with Trolls and just got sick of it.

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    4. Hey Yael'

      (captaincrunch)

      Down in South Texas where we support Israel.

      Ya'all up there in Israel ever need any back up. Feel free to give us a holler.

      We like to play 'Cowboys and Muslims' (we done ran out of Indians)

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    5. Thank you all. Now I feel more safe. I am a "girl" (grand mother) Yael is a feamale name from the Bible. (my English is not so good I hope you don't mind). I am bothered by trolls in blogland, they are not Muslems, most of them are from England or Ireland.And thank you again,

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    6. Just delete the trolls, Yael. If I bothered with them on my blog I wouldn't do anything but argue all day. It's just easier to delete unpleasant people. Let them find somebody else to fight with, I don't have the time or inclination. Your English is probably better than mine, since I usually speak a Southern dialect, although I can do "standard english" if I have to.

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  5. Maybe I should pick up more ammo for my SKS? Before that's banned too.

    Anyway, did some primitive bushcraft type stuff back in the day. It is possible to turn primitive into comfortable, and that's what I'm more into these days.

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    1. Sixbears, I saw where Michael said people were buying up the 7.62X39. I would imagine that's because Blowjama may try to ban it because most commercial imports are Russian, but I haven't seen anything yet specifically about 7.62X39. William the Bastard got away with that when he was in the White House, when he banned all Chinese arms and ammo. I guess the Dems figure if they can do enough executive actions, we'll be like the British, out there with crossbows and samurai swords.

      I never really got into primitive living. I did enough of that in the Marines to last me a life time and never hankered for it after I got out. On the other hand, I'm absolutely fixed here, no mobility whatsoever, since from a logistics aspect moving my supplies and equipment is not on.

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  6. Kirkman used to be srtickly American made, but no more.

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    1. I don't think I'd ever heard of them before I got this catalog. I don't think there are many things still manufactured in America.

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  7. This has been an ammo buying few months for me. When the shenannigans with Kalashnikov Concern popped up I ordered a case of Wolf 7.62x39 just in case. When the whole M855 thing came up I wanted to get a case of that stuff but foolishly waited a day too long so it was gone, at least for reasonable prices. Ordered a case of M193 instead.

    This spring I'm going to do a pistol class and shoot up most of a case of 9mm ball. Did buy it for training last year when I planned to take a class but I have gotten used to the higher number in my stash so I'll want to replace that.

    Just got a little Ruger LCP. Will need to get at least 250 rounds of ammo for it, 500 would be better.

    Also I need to stock up on at least a couple hundred rounds of .308 150 grain SP ammo.

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    1. You can reload 9mm ball like popcorn. It's easy to crank out a lot of rounds so that's cheap shooting, especially if you have the brass. It has been hard to find 5.56 of any kind at a reasonable price in quantity for some time. Ever so often, AIM would get Swedish ammo 900 rds to the can for $500 but that seemed to be very expensive to me.

      I have a lot of 7.62X51, most of it Australian. Don't have much .308 and what I do have is fmj. With things going like they are politically it's not a bad idea to buy up what ammo you need when it's affordable.

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  8. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    I was going to watch that latest 'Hunger Games' movie but I was in one of my Redneck moods, so I watched 'Smokey and the Bandit' for the 400th time.

    I was nine years old when that movie came out back in 1977, so its a classic fun movie to watch.
    The good old days when the PLO was the only terrorist group. The Shah was still in power in Iran most people only knew of Afghanistan from Kiplings writings of the British expedition in the 19th century.

    I believe back in '77 the communist were starting up in Angola (thanks to the Cubans) I think the only real problem was with the communist. I miss the Cold War. We at least knew who the enemy was and most communist were not motivated to die for their cause (I don't recall Marx writing anything about 52 virgins and paradise)

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    1. I haven't ever seen any of the Hunger Games movies, and I've never seen Smokey and the Bandit though I have heard of it.

      During the 1970's it was always the Russians, or their proxies. In the end it turned out to be a "pass" and it's a good thing since both sides had nucs and a lot of them.

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  9. I did not know that about bushcraft, so I was interested in the explanation. Sounds useful is one is plopped into the middle of a forest suddenly, or has to make a several hundred mile trek across the wilderness.

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    1. There are all different shades of survivalism, and they tend to blend into one another. Bush Crafters run the gamut from the week long hunting trip out to Montana, to the fellows who base their contingency plans on being mobile and lightly equipped. Bush craft is probably a handy thing for anyone to have, while Bush Crafters take it a good deal further. The big drawback to me is living so hand to mouth, and the seeming lack of a place for wives and kids in the strategy.

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    2. The original 'Bushcrafters' are the tribes who lived in the world's mountains - jungles - deserts - forests. Bushcraft is learning the skills that enable them to live in their local environment. To the originals - it was (and is) just their way of life. I think the latest world population of those who live without electricity is 20%. Imagine living without electricity. I'm sure those who are there are well immersed into 'Bushcraft'. The persons who practice learning and perfecting their skills are just covering their bases.

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    3. It' a set of skills, but it's also a growing philosophy in terms of what constitutes the best way to deal with some long term disaster that causes disruption in the social system. The term was probably originally related to the indigenous groups who practice those skills, but the context I was looking at was the one most of the articles in this issue of American Survival Guide examined, i.e. the Australian movement which is growing over here and in Europe now. You have a valid point about the origins of the skill set required.

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  10. We have ordered several things from Kirkman and it was all really nice. They even had the wicks (thick, round) for our very old standing oil lamp.

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    1. I wonder why I never heard of them. I thought I had a good grasp of all the outfits that manufactured goods applicable to survivalism. Not so though, in this case. I guess you learn something new every day.

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  11. Harry,

    Our son did some research on Amazon when he ordered those ammo cans. He said he found a great daily deal, and the shipping was free. Hopefully when you go to look on Amazon, you'll find a good deal with free shipping. It always pays to have extra ammo cans because they're used for so many things.

    I'll have to check out the WT Kirkman, never heard of them. I've always used Lehman's.

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    1. I have never used Kirkman either, but they do have some nice things that are useful. I should have checked Amazon for ammo cans but I buy so much stuff from AIM surplus, it just never crosssed my mine to look elsewhere. AIM sells brand new cans for a fair price. I'll be checking Amazon next time I buy though.

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