“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Sunday, August 2, 2015

Cheese, Butter, Bacon, and Pilot Bread in the can at SafeCastle.

 SafeCastle has Bega canned cheese on sale, a case of 36 cans is $118.00.

Another survival food supply outfit had it on sale for $2.50 a can. As soon as I got the email alert I went right to that web page, but it was sold out.

Still, the SafeCastle price comes to $3.27 a can.
 Not bad.

I've eaten this brand before, and it's just about like the Kraft canned cheese from Australia.  A lot better than cheese powder.

Cheese powder is good for flavoring food, but not for slicing up and putting on sandwiches or potatoes like this cheese is.

A case of 24 cans of Red Feather butter is higher, at $160 .00   Red Feather is good butter. I should note it's actual, old time butter and not margarine.




SafeCastle Survival Supplies

The link above takes you to Safe Castle. Right now their web page is advertising free shipping. I don't know how long that will last.

They also have a case of Yoder's canned bacon marked down to $164.42.  Usually runs $207.00.  There are 12 cans per case, and between 40 and 50 slices of bacon per can.




Safe Castle isn't the only place you can find these items, but after searching all my normal sources on line, they have the best prices as of today.  The "no shipping fees" helps a lot too, while they last.


The bacon is already cooked. You can heat it up, or eat it right out of the can.  



I store a lot of pilot bread.  It's kind of like hard tack.  I get "Kleppers Ships Biscuits) in number ten cans at the scratch and dint grocery store when they have any. The cans only cost $5.00 each. Think of big, thick soda crackers. There are different varients of pilots bread or ships bread, some of them are like hard tack.  One of the bloggers I read is working on making her own hard tack. She is going to do a post on it when she perfects it, and I'll link to it. Obviously, if you can make your own you are better off than having to buy it.

 Right now, a case of Pilot Bread is going for $120.36 at SafeCastle. These are not number ten cans, as far as I can make out. Here's what their web page says about the product:

13 Crackers per can.

Pilot bread is a significant source of food energy in a small, durable, light weight package. Unlike our competitors we are selling our Pilot bread in the smaller #4.11 cans which saves space especially if you are in a crunch for packing stuff for a trip.

Pilot bread tastes good paired with cheese, peanut butter, salami, or dipped in soup or coffee, just to name a few ideas.

Here is some History on Sailor's Pilot Bread for all those who have never heard of it.
Pilot Bread is known by other names such as ship's biscuit and hardtack. The name Hardtack is derived from the British sailor slang for food, "tack". Because it is so hard and dry, pilot's crackers (when properly stored and transported) will survive rough handling and endure extremes of temperature. The more refined Captain's biscuit was made with finer flour.

Many early physicians believed that most medicinal problems were associated with digestion. Hence, for both sustenance and avoidance of illness, a daily consumption of a biscuit was considered good for one's health. The bakers of the time made biscuits as hard as possible, as the biscuits would soften as time went on.

Pilot Bread was even used during the American Civil War and Spanish-American War.



I'm not touting SafeCastle. They have always done right by me, but a can of bacon is the same where ever you buy it. These are just ideas for adding to your long term food storage. There are lots of sources.

This is what I get at the scratch and dint grocery store in North Carolina. They have them about once every month or so. This is a number ten can size, crammed with crackers. They seem to stay good for ever, even after you open them.

26 comments:

  1. I will keep my eye out for that pilot bread, never heard of it until your post. The true test is if the kids will eat it, but that's the challenge with most long-term canned food.

    On a side note, I can neither confirm nor deny the existence of #10 cans in my basement, as doing so may incriminate me as a "domestic insurgent". --Troy

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    1. Troy, if the kids like soda crackers, they'll like "hard tack", and you can put things like butter, peanut butter and cheese on it to make it more palatable.

      Yeah, that's a dead giveaway!

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  2. I should stock up the boat with some of that canned goodness. Rice and beans is fine now and then, but variety keeps the crew happy.

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    1. It was actually a web page that supplies sail boats and yachts ( a ships chandler, isn't that what it's called?) that I bought my first case of Australian Craft cheese in cans from. I think a lot of these products originated with long distance sailors.

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  3. I've got a couple of cases of the pilot bread from Safecastle in our "emergency larder".

    I've wondered about the cheese and butter, so thanks for the info.

    Off to buy some cheese now!

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    1. I wish I'd got to the sale, that was a really good price for cheese. But the SafeCastle price isn't bad, and a bunch of outfits carry it. I usually shop around and buy the cheapest price or the best shipping deal when I get those things for long term storage. The cheese and butter are really good. When my kids lived at home, one problem I had was keeping the food in the long term storage because the kids would get it out and eat it for "tv" food.

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    2. Well, no kids here anymore, except maybe for me!

      It gets stored, and hopefully never opened.....

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    3. Should last you indefinitely then. It's good to have those things to enliven the meals made of long term food storage items, which tend to be pretty drab.

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  4. Harry,

    I never cease to amazed at the variety of canned foods you can buy in America!!

    I grew up eating Kraft Cheddar cheese, here it comes wrapped in aluminium foil and packaged in cardboard boxes, we still buy it to keep in our larder as a back up and use it in several different dishes as well. I must have a look for the Bega cheese, I buy their fresh cheese but did not know that they also had canned cheese, visited their factory a few years ago on the south coast of NSW and had a good time tasting all of their cheeses.

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    1. The Australians and New Zealanders are the source of a lot of the canned dairy products. When I was a kid, I can remember seeing American canned cheese and butter, it was popular because in South Georgia, there were people who did not have electricity in their houses, and refrigerators were not all that reliable. Now I think it's campers, hikers, survivalists, sailors, and preppers who are the main market here in the states. The Australian and New Zealand cheese and butter are top drawer.

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  5. Thanks for the information about the crackers. I have been looking for a way to store them but all I had found so far was a method of sealing them in canning jars. And because I have so much other food that goes into the jars, I hated using them for crackers. A search found that Walmart and Sams carry the same Keebler crackers you talked about. They are out of stock at the moment, but will keep an eye out for them. Excellent idea.

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    1. Canned crackers are good, and the cans with resealable lids not only keep the cracker fresh once opened, but they make excellent storage vessels for whatever you may need once the crackers are gone.

      I hope you don't have to pay too much for the crackers on line. They are dirt cheap at the scratch and dent store.

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  6. I need to buy about three cases each of of bacon, butter and cheese. Maybe rotate one of each yearly.

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    1. The bacon goes fast. It's really easy to open and heat up on a Sunday morning. I shouldn't use it that way because store bacon in a plastic wrapper is so much cheaper, but the line between long term storage and just general use blurs here a lot of the time.

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  7. I learned something new today. I never knew you could get cheese in a can like that. I love cheese! I do have Keebler crackers. I buy just regular soda crackers to break my chicken though. The Keebler ones are meant to add slices of cheese on. Nom Nom

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    1. Alissa, just about anything can be had in a can if you know where to look. The great things about canned food are the ease of storage, long term shelf life, and variety available.

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  8. what is the self life of the bacon and the cheese?

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    1. Well, I can say from personal experience that I've eaten both the cheese and the butter than had been down in the store room on the lowest level of the main house, in cans that had been there for more than ten years. Tasted just as good as cans I'd opened the day they arrived.

      The different web pages that sell the stuff have different answers to that question. It's important, in my experience, to keep both the butter and cheese in cool, dry storage areas. The butter will liquefy if the can gets hot. Not that it's any less palatable but I have the notion that it won't keep as long if that happens. All of my storage spaces are climate controlled, but I keep the butter and cheese in the largest store room , in the lowest level, because that part of the house is underground on two sides and even in the most brutal heat conditions here in the Blue Ridge, the ambient temperature in there doesn't rise above 75.

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  9. Canned Cheese.....It is amazing what is out there but too few people look!
    I have finally had some quiet time alone with my laptop and have been catching up on my blog reading. I have so enjoyed your last few and the ferrets rules are excellent. Did you read Methuselah's Children by Robert Heinlein? I love his Character Lazarus Long.

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    1. Fiona, I don't remember Methuselah's Children, but I will get a copy and read it. If there's a Heinlein book out there I've missed (and he was a prolific writer) I want it.

      The ferret rules were obviously written by a long time ferret friend. They fit the animals to a T. Right now, I am sitting here in the house, where it's cool, drinking coffee and catching up on the blog. The ferrets are asleep about six feet away, underneath an old "fuzzy" blanket that is one of their favorite resting places. Without them, I think I would be very lonely up here sometimes.

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    2. it was in the collection of short stories "The Past Through Tomorrow" and the follow up was "Time Enough For Love". I enjoyed my Ferret a great deal...the have character!

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    3. I'll see if I can find a copy used on line. Sounds interesting to me.

      Ferrets are like furry people. Except, unlike people, they are all pleasant creatures.

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  10. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Sharks really dig Yoders Bacon.


    Any no.10 cans of food, Yoders bacon and Twinkies I have. I ate up already or I used to feed the sharks so they don't feed on me.

    I do stock up beer. I got lots of beer.

    The federal reserve is solvent. Big brother is looking out for us and some animals are more equal than others. All is well.

    No need to stock up on anything. General Jack T. Ripper is making sure our 'precious bodily fluids' are pure and Dr. Strangelove has everything under control.



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    1. I don't have any Twinkies, alas. About all that I have in the way of sweets is canned pudding powder (vanilla, chocolate and banana), sugar and honey. Oh, and some hard candy and chocolate stored in metal canisters that I got after Christmas on sale one time. I wanted the cool metal canisters more than I did the candy...

      No beer here, but I have hard liquor. I figure it will be good for trading.

      1984, Animal Farm, and Dr. Strangelove are all good ways to pass time. I like the Peter Sellers character in Strangelove, can't remember his name but he was an RAF Wing Commander.

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  11. I do have some of that red feather butter on hand but I have not tried it. I have heard all good things though. Maybe the pilot crackers are like my hard tack? I have been dehydrating a lot of foods lately. So much that I am working on my husband to see if he will build me an Appalachian solar dehydrator. He is pretty handy so if he has the time I think he will.

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    1. Lisa, you'll like the butter when you try it, it's very good. I mentioned to some of the other folks that you are working on hard tack. I think being able to make it would be a lot better than what I have to do, which is buy it when it appears, pretty hit and miss way to stock up .

      I have a little dehydrator I use to make beef jerky. I know Vicki at Mom's Scribbles does a whole lot of dehydrating. I hope your husband will build you the dehydrator you want, I'm sure it would be a help in building up the supplies in your long term storage.

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