“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Thursday, January 19, 2017

A gift for a granddaughter. (updated 0119171600E)

I had a comment from an individual who was looking for a good gift for an 8 year old granddaughter. The girl already has a pink rifle, probably a Cricket.  I still have my children's Cricket that they learned to shoot on.


Of course, mine is wood stocked as they didn't make the pink version back in the early 90's.

The question raised was what would make a good present for the little girl, in terms of something she could use in the field, or to help her learn field craft?

I am drawing a blank. It's been so long since my daughter was a little girl I just can't seem to come up with any good suggestions. I thought about emailing Glock Mom, or Lisa, or Alissa, or some of the other ladies I know, but everyone I can think of only has boys.....

Here's the pertinent excerpt from the comment:

So, in stead of going out in the freezing cold, I did some shopping for my 10 year old grandson.
I bought a stainless steel water bottle (32 oz.) made by
Hood River. I have one and it's keeps my tea very hot and it's very heavy duty. I also bought a pair of binoculars for him to use when they go out hunting. I already have a water filter on hand to put into his box before I ship it. I just couldn't by a toy anything, and as grandma, I can send him what I think is sensible.
His little sister has her own pink .22 and is very good
with it. I have until Aug. to come up with a sensible birthday gift for her. Any ideas?
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So if you can think of something in that line, please let me know.



Bikers going to D.C. to support Trump.


I just got this via email from a friend. Should be an interesting day tomorrow.  It will be a new experience for the snowflakes to meet people in the streets who don't have their hands figuratively tied behind their backs......


29 comments:

  1. "The question raised was what would make a good present for the little girl, in terms of something she could use in the field, or to help her learn field craft?"

    Supportive and caring male influence..you know, a grampa. The rest is details.

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    1. True, and I'm sure this person who commented scores high in that regard. I just amended my post to include the excerpt from her comment that deals with the present.

      I thought about a fire starter kit, or a knife, but the girl is pretty young. On the other hand, if she can handle a rifle (under supervision of course) I'm sure she could learn to use a fire starter kit. I don't know about the knife. My wife is 64 and I cringe whenever she gets a letter opener in her hands....

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    2. I tried posting a comment on your blog, using a different nom de plume. Your software said it went to moderation, let me know it if it works. I have never had any luck with wordpress or whatever that is you have. You'll recognize the email address.

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  2. I had a Ithaca single shot lever action .22 when I was 13. That was first gun I owned. All my kids learned on it. It's still my gun safe. The grandkids might want to learn.

    My dad gave my daughter a good folding knife when she was around that age, so that doesn't seem out of the ordinary to me.

    Other interesting things: large magnifying glass, compass, topo maps of the area, one of those break down fishing kits that stores in a small package, personalized life jacket, kid's field guides: birds, plants, animals, etc. Just a few ideas.

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    1. Those all seem like good ideas. All things that are practical and interesting at the same time.

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  3. You never go wrong with a nice Swiss army knife. More specifically the Victorinox Pioneer. A good solid simple pocket knife that both boys and girls will appreciate.
    https://www.knifecenter.com/item/VN53960/

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    1. Those are nice to have. I've got several around here in a foot locker, along with some Buck knives. I'm sure everybody who goes camping needs a knife, I just wasn't sure an 8 year old would be ready for a knife without supervision. I think, on reflection, that you and Six Bears are right.

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    2. I was allowed to buy my first Swiss knife when I was ten. Later that year I also bought myself a nice German made Solingen 12" hunting knife. Both purchased with money I earned from mowing lawns. I still have that Swiss knife thought the blade is quite worn from forty plus years of sharpening. The Hunting knife is still in my parents kitchen drawer now sporting new handle and sheath. The Swiss army knife is a good choice for a kid as it is a true pocket knife, much more of a tool and not quite as threatening as some of the modern tacti-cool knives. Another alternative along that same idea would be one of the new Leatherman multi-tools. I think those would be especially good gifts for girls as it is not often that they are encouraged to explore those skills.

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    3. We had Barlow knives when I was a kid. You could get them at the hardware store for a dollar or so, in different sizes. They had one blade, and a wooden handle. I don't think they make them anymore these days.

      My wife has a little leatherman kit she keeps in her purse. The last time we tried to go to the courthouse in town, they wouldn't let her in with it in her purse. It's just a tiny little thing. When I saw your suggestion that incident sprang to mind. For a little girl not going in the courthouse, that would be a good thing to have. ;-)

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  4. Harry, thank you for posting this. I am the grandma that asked for ideas. I have started a list with the above
    suggestions. I was thinking about a small rocket type stove that burns just twigs etc. They live in So. Oregon
    and frequently get out in the mountains. I also like the
    idea of the break-down fishing rod. She has one, but a full size and she loves to fish. She may be only 8, but is mature and very smart for her age.

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    1. I figured some folks that come by here would have ideas. I guess I had a mental block, I just couldn't think of anything appropriate. I am not much of an outdoorsman these days, though when I was younger my son and I explored all through these mountains together.

      I'm glad to help. Your granddaughter is lucky to have a grandma with a practical bent of mind.

      I have two nieces who are grown women and both of them are hunters and good at field craft. They don't have any children yet though.

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  5. Wow, you guys make things tough. The first thing that came to mind was fire starting. Then children's field guides. Then folding knives. Everything that I could come up with has been covered.

    And I agree with Harry. That is one lucky little girl to have such a great grandma............

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    1. taminator,it's hard when you get right down to it, to come up with useful items for an 8 year old to use in the field. But it does seem to me she's getting a firm grounding in the basic skills from her family.

      We did a lot of camping when I was a kid. My dad made all the boys go into Boy Scouts, and though I was not enthusiastic initially I enjoyed it once I got familiar with it.

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  6. When my daughter was old enough and expressed an interest in being with me in the great outdoors, the first thing I did was buy her a good pair of boots. I Also threw in some merino wool socks. You can never go wrong with good footwear. --Troy

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    1. Troy, I still buy my grown up kids good outdoor clothing because they won't spend the money on it. Living up where they do, heavy duty cold weather clothing is essential and I insist they keep it in the car with their other emergency gear during the winter season. Good boots and good socks are a boon in the bush, and nice to have even if you don't go out in the boonies anymore. I have some excellent boots myself, though I don't need them anymore, but I wear them because they support my ankles. Good idea on the gift for the little girl.

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  7. Harry,

    May I suggest a pink camo carry case for that gun?? Or how about a fine little back pack to carry her gear in. Hobby Lobby has these kits where she could make para cord jewelry comes with a book, para cord, beads, clasps etc.... just a thought!!!

    I'm looking forward to seeing the motorcycles roll into DC :-)

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    1. Sandy, those are good ideas! I have seen the para cord kits, we sold them at the state park when I worked out there on that senior program.

      I watched the inauguration this morning on Fox all the way from early morning until it was over, and other than a few oblique references , I didn't get any news from the narrators about anything happening in the city at all. The Fox guy did say that when "the helicopter" flew in they couldn't put it on the air because some people yelled vulgarities. He said they couldn't even show it on a cable news program it was so bad. But that was all he said, no amplification. I hope the motorcycle folks got in there ok.

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  8. LED head lamp. Some great adventures exploring the woods at night, but there are places where some illumination is appreciated (especially with a bump in the night, which is magnified in the darkness, lol). A headlamp with at least red night time bulb which does not completely spoil night vision is useful.

    I also recommend the small Swiss Army Knife (NOT a knock-off, the real deal). Teach the new owner one blade's use a day at a time with demonstration, and responsibility and respect will come. A carabiner with 550 cord lanyard is a great accessory for that tool. Essential in my opinion.

    Nice ideas above - hope this helps.

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    1. Good plan. The lanyard idea is something I hadn't thought of at all. I buy cheap but functional knives for myself from Bud K, but if it's a gift for a grandchild, I agree a "real" one would be best, because those will last a lifetime.

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  9. One suggestion I have is making her a backpack with field stuff, survival things. We did soke for our boys for christmas and it was a huge hit. We put things like a compass, dehydrated foods water filter, map, paracord, flashlight. etc... Senior included survival knife but they may not want that yet for an 8 yr. old..

    Another idea is her own Hennessy Hammock they have the scout version for kids. Our boys love to set theres up and create their own little campsite.

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    1. Glock Mom, those are great ideas. I should have thought of a hammock. The back pack with the equipment in it is a good thought.

      My son and I still have a fire pit in our woods where we go have an outdoor fire and visit together when he comes home. We used to go out into the national forest , way out there, where nobody goes, when he was younger. I can't do that anymore, so the fire pit is our compromise campground.

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  10. A pair of binoculars and a flashlight ?
    Although the Swiss Army knife would be a winner, also.

    - Charlie

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    1. Charlie, you can't go wrong with a Swiss Army knife, sure enough. Binoculars and a flashlight come in real handy, too. I bought a full case of NATO military flashlights, with multiple lenses of different colors, and put them in my barter supplies. Everybody needs a flashlight.

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  11. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    Get a CZ-452 Bolt action .22. Yeah' I know its a little big but the kids will grow into it. The rifle will retain its value. Its a hard, rugged, Woodstock rifle that's really fun to shoot even for an old guy. Its a rifle that can last generations. Mount a scope on it and zap critter's in the eyeballs.
    'Harry, if you come across a CZ-452 in your travels. Buy It! You will feel like your 12 years old again. There won't be a chicken left your property:)
    The Ruger 10/22 is a runner up. Cricket's are nice little starter guns but kids grow fast and a 6 year old under, extremely close supervision can shoot a CZ-452, grow more into it by age 12 and be deadly accurate and ready for an AR-15 (if the kid is responsible, mature, and under close supervision)

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    1. I don't know that particular rifle, but it sounds like a good one. Crickets have the advantage of being really inexpensive, and my experience of CZ is that their weapons are top notch but not cheap.

      I have some .22LR rifles. I have a couple of Polish M1946 trainers that are copies of the Mosin Nagant except that they are single shot. I've got a Ruger 10-22 and a Remington Viper. I have my kids old Cricket and the rifle they moved up to after that, the Lakeland scoped single shot. But I wouldn't mind having a CZ .22LR if I came across one at the right price.

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    2. The CZ Scout is the child sized bolt gun, but I believe it was recently discontinued due to the newer 455 design. If CZ is smart, they will introduce a newer Scout, it is a great small woods rifle, even us 'seasoned citizens' like them for our use.

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    3. I'm not as up on the CZ rifles as Captain Crunch is. At least, not the modern ones. I've never owned a scout rifle, unless my two Gibb's Rifle Company Enfield MK.VI rifles count. And they are reproductions of a rifle that never made it into production!

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  12. High quality outdoor gear like rainwear/windbreakers, the technical hiking pants that convert to shorts, or a camelback hydration system (they make nice kid versions). This is all great we've requested from relatives for our kids for birthdays over there pay couple of years. It's expensive but excellent to have and will last a long time.

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    1. Lisa, given all the hiking your family does, I'd consider you what we used to call in the Marines a "duty expert." Those sound like good additions to a small campers equipment. When my son and I were doing a lot of exploring in the national forest so long ago, we got all our gear out of a surplus store! Things have come a long way.

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