“Wyrd biõ ful ãræd.”

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Time for a little test. Relaxation.

Wire Note:
CC: There's a comment addressed to you .




Most of this past week we had a slow, drizzling rain.  Today it's clear, but it's 52 degrees outside and the wind is blowing enough to move the tops of the poplars back and forth. Not a day to be poking around outside.


Years ago, after having read this book, I decided I'd do a sort of  "Operational Readiness Exercise" annually.  I used to just do two weeks, but this year we are going a full month.

The objective is to see if you are as prepared as you think you are.

Starting May 1, we have not bought any groceries, equipment, supplies, medicine, et. al.  Nor will we, until 1 June. That's really the only way I can see if my calculations are right on what we should have stored away.

By going a month, I have a better chance of finding any shortfalls, and once I do that, I can multiple consumption by the number of months I want to project out .

The longer the period you do your test, the less mistakes should crop up in your calculations.

This doesn't mean we won't go into town, won't go to the parks. Nothing will really change except that once we run out of something, we go without it.  Fresh vegetables and fresh bread are a case in point. If we had something growing we could use that to augment the vegetables, but at this moment we don't have a producing garden. My wife can make bread, we have all the components, and she can make cornbread, which is easier and suits me just as well.

If past experience holds true, my wife may run out of medicine. We get 90 day prescriptions, but she is less conscientious than I am about squirreling back a reserve.  When and if that happens, obviously we will go buy more but I will give more thought on how to handle the problem.  The easiest thing would be for me to just assume responsibility for her medicines, but that has negative ramifications for the inevitable day when I croak and she has to manage on her own.

We didn't run out and buy a lot of stuff before we started this, as that would negate the whole purpose. In cases where we can, we'll substitute for essential items that run out. For instance, if you run out of dog food, you can feed dogs rice with biscuits or cornbread.  You can feed chickens rice. Cats will eat bread mixed with tuna. The only animals I have that absolutely have to have their own food is the ferrets. I'm mindful of that and I don't ever fail to keep a big reserve of their food on hand.

We won't eat out for this period of time. We do like to go to town for breakfast or lunch, and we always eat at the big buffet in the town where our doctors office is, but we won't for the month of May. That would skew the results.

Another positive aspect of an exercise like this is using up supplies of  things like chicken feed, dog food, cat food, etc that are stored in the barn.  It's a way of insuring rotation of perishable items.

I have enough dried fruit to make up for the lack of fresh fruit, but it's plums and apples I miss most. Other than that, I don't expect any real difference in life style except that we will cook a lot more, and most of the ingredients will be canned , long term storage, or frozen.

Amazon Prime:

I'm enjoying it. I ordered a DVD and got free two day shipping. That's nice. I have watched a number of movies and tv shows, and that was fun too.  The only thing I haven't figured out yet, is the books. I thought I would be able to find lots of post apocalytic fiction I could read. But I haven't. I click the category Amazon Prime on the book page, but then when I try to search it goes right back to "All". I haven't found many books available through Prime I want to read. There's another "service" that is $9.00 a month extra, and it does let you read a lot of books, but I'm not going to pay for two services. Not that there aren't a lot of books I could read using my Prime subscription, it's just that none of them interest me.


The movies and television series are great, though.



One of the shows I watched was Above and Beyond. It's about the founding of the Israeli Air Force. There's some great footage of early Israeli aircraft, and interviews with a lot of the surviving pilots who flew them.

I have several books on how the Israeli's obtained military equipment, and on the 1948 war. This augmented those books , and I learned things I didn't previously know from the show.

Just in the area of small arms, I saw combat footage that clearly illustrated the use of types of weapons I hadn't previously realized were involved in that war. There are segments that show Arabs using Enfield P14 rifles, and a wide variety of crew served weapons on both sides that must have been scrounged from WW2 battlesfields. There are lots of Mausers, Enfield MK.III, Springfield 1903, Thompsons, MG42, etc but I knew about those.

Motion picture footage of the aircraft in action is amazing. All in all , this was a great flick. I ordered the DVD I liked it so much.










That's about all that's happening up here.  It's quiet, and we are just taking it easy while this wind is blowing. 

Thought for the day:




Music to help you relax:


Just finished an hour or so of reading blogs. Lots of people are really stressed out right now.
This helps me relax when I am feeling that way.

Wait til nightfall.  Light a candle or two in a comfortable room , turn out the lights.  Don't have any noise to distract you.  Then, have a glass of wine, some brandy, or whatever you like.  Listen to the music, and try not to think about anything specific.   Always helps me with stress.















45 comments:

  1. Excellent way to test preparedness. I think I will do the same in June. I need to keep my grocery order service active, but if during the test period I order only pantry items and nothing fresh, and then just set aside those items, my results should be pretty accurate. I don't eat out any more but do confess to ordering a pizza delivered once in awhile. Should be interesting to see if I run out of anything and also to see what foods I get to missing when I can't get them, like fresh milk or fresh fruits. I can go through a gallon of milk a week and have been ordering bananas, grapes and oranges often. I have lots of powdered milk on hand as well as canned fruit, but I wonder how that will compare to fresh.

    I would never have thought to listen to Japanese music, but find I really like it. It is incredibly relaxing and I can see where it will make a good problem solving background.

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    1. Neil Strauss,who wrote that book, set out to learn survival skills. What was different about him was how he subjected his newly acquired abilities to rigorous practical application. I decided to do the same periodically up here and found it to be a useful practice. It really doesn't change your daily life other than your diet and that not dramatically. You really don't even notice you're doing it unless you run out of something important, and the only burble we've had of any consequence in the past has been with medicine. If you are nearing refill time on a ninety day cycle you can get caught short pretty easily unless you have built up a reserve.

      I got used to Japanese music while living in Japan. They are a very reflective people, and their parks and music are designed to create an appropriate environment for contemplation.

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  2. Harry, when you get on Amazon, on the drop down menu where you type in what you want, go to Kindle Books. Then type in free kindle apocalyptic books. My DH reads tons of these...both fiction and non fiction. I buy a years worth of meds from where I told you. If I ever ran out, I would not survive. DH is not on any meds, so no worries there. For greenies, have you tried growing sprouts? They are healthy and full of vitamins and great on sandwiches or just by themselves. Check out www.sproutpeople.com they have tons of variety. They make sprouting easy. Never thought of tuna and bread for cats...tuna, yes as they are true meat eaters. Good tip on rice for chickens... Fried egg sandwich on fresh bread with sprouts....yum. Red Feather makes great canned butter which we keep handy. Also, OvaEasy egg crystals taste like fresh eggs, scrambled. I try to keep 3 month supply of canned and dry cat food at all times. Same for the chickens and rotate everything always. Also check out Amazon smiles. They donate part of what you buy to your favorite charity, they list hundreds. Wish we could grow field corn in this climate. Cornbread is a real staple.

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    1. Tewshooz, I haven't tried that, I'll give it a shot. I knew there was a way to get the books but I was trying to tie it in to Prime. I forget the name of the service where you can read zillions of books by topic, it's something like Amazon Live. I see from poking around that I can read two digital books a month for free using Prime, that's probably what stuck in my mind.

      I have some beans sprouting in the plant room now, but the chickens got in there through a window and knocked over several trays, all the dirt fell out. I put the seeds back but I don't know if it hurt them or not.

      I buy all my tuna in oil, so that if I have to use it for the cats, they will get nutrients from the vegetable oil. I like tuna myself, so I keep a lot of cat food stored. But since the old momma cat had 8 babies and they all survived, cat food consumption has gone up a good bit.

      We've got a couple of cases of Red Feather and some loose cans. Good stuff. I liked it a lot, then I read a book about a guy who sailed around the world alone, and called it "ghea" or something like that. He said it was some kind of Indian butter. That kind of put me off, but I've been eating it for a long time and since it came from New Zealand I know it's not nasty.

      I have plenty of corn meal stored, although it doesn't keep as well as most things, and as we talked about before, I've got a good mill. Everybody and their dog grows corn here, so in season it's readily available by the road where people put it out in bundles with a tin can for you to leave the money in (on the back roads, not the main roads.)

      I found a book in a dentists office once, about Lumpkin County back at the turn of the century. It told all about what people fed their dogs, and I realized they didn't buy "dog food" they just fed their dogs what the family ate, supplemented with lots of biscuit.

      I'll look at the Amazon Smiles. I never heard of it but maybe they have a ferret rescue on the list.

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    2. harry, ghee is just rendered butter.
      people where there is no refrigeration have been preserving butter this way for generations.
      put in heavy pot on very low heat and skim milk and salt from surface.
      store in sterilized jar and use normally.

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    3. tewshooz, go to'rural revolution' web log written by patrice lewis. they found a 3 foot corn for short seasons and it makes corn just like the tall kind.
      think the name was yukon, not sure. you will find the info there.
      don't know if you are short season.

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    4. It was just a psychological thing, to do with a nasty description of the stuff I read in book about the British in Indian during the Victorian Era. Then I found out the New Zealand butter was called ghee by some folks, and that was kind of unsettling. But I know what comes out of New Zealand is not nasty, and I do like the taste of the Red Feather butter.

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  3. Harry - as you know we live in the middle of nowhere and have been practicing with our preps pretty much daily. where jamie works there is a small store that sells crap food that we wouldn't touch with a long pole. our nearest town is an hour away and our nearest city an hour and a half. both of us only go in to town if we absolutely have to, otherwise jam does the groceries about every 3 weeks. i have come up with amazing ways to save/extend produce and we always have our sprouts and certain herbs all year round.

    i think your testing idea is awesome and i hope a lot of people learn from it.

    music is so good for the soul as you know. it has such calming effects if you play the right kind of stuff for your soul. i love all kinds of different music like you.

    anyway - are you still using the philip nolan email address? i have something important to tell you and want to be sure that i am using the right address.

    sending love to you all, always! your friend,
    kymber

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    1. I know you two have been up there a really long time, and have built yourself a comfortable and well appointed place. I often envy you your isolated location and the fact that you have both the woods and the beach right there to hand. No six hour drives for you if you want to go to the shore.

      The testing thing is something we have been doing for a long time, though never for a whole month before. All it really consists of is cutting out buying consumables, we still go to town and I still buy my magazines and all. But it does show up what shortfalls might occur if something turned out the lights. I went to make my salad for lunch about an hour ago and saw there is only enough fresh lettuce in the icebox for maybe two more. I'm not apt to starve for want of salad but I'll miss it. This is day six, 25 more to go.

      You should have an email from me using the philipnolan1953@gmail.com address in your mailbox. If not let me know, something went awry.

      I am very interested in what's going on up there and look forward to your email.

      Harry

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    2. Harry - sending you the email right away! xoxsoxo

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    3. Harry, Ghee is not the same as stick butter. I also have canned ghee. When you melt butter, you can see the solids falling to the bottom and the clear butter on top. That clear butter is ghee. Many cultures cook with it because of its higher smoke point. It tastes like butter (cause it is). It does not go rancid like a stick of butter at room temp.

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    4. Tewshooz, what kind of put me off was I had read a book about the English army in India in the Victorian era, and they talked about the Indians eating "ghee", and it sounded really nasty.

      But until I knew that the New Zealand stuff was ghee I never really thought about it and I loved the taste. So I just have to tell myself that this is from New Zealand and not what I was reading about.... ;-)

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  4. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    'Zen and the Art of finding the screw I needed "for the Mosin Nagant"

    Late last night I discovered that Numrich gun parts. They had the screw I needed for five dollars:)

    The rifle I have I cant find a good description on. Its a 'Dragoon' That I am pretty sure of. Made in 1900, on the 1891 Pattern. The Finn's captured it and added the swivel slings. I believe that that may have been the only modification. There is the 'SA' in a box cartouche verifying that.
    I love seeing the two 'Tsarist' doubled headed eagles on the receiver and no hammer and sycle. I have the full length 28 inch barrel that was not cut down and emasculated by the 'Soviet Swine' in the attempt to make it a 91/30 Pattern rifle. It also has the Arsini sight. This is a 'very, very close example' to a true turn of the century, Tsarist rifle from Nicholas the 2's reign. Yeah' it was captured by the Finn's but as I said. It was not emasculated by the Soviet's. The rifle is long, very long. 51 and half inches long! I can just imagine how long it would be with a bayonet.

    Here's a another rifle like mine on Gunbroker http://www.gunbroker.com/item/641924640

    Its an exact match as mine but made in 1897 so its 'No FFL Required" I think that's neat. Something that fires the easily available 7.62 by 54R, five shot rifle that's No FFL!

    I did fire and sight in two other rifles yesterday. I may take a third out later today. When I get that screw I will take out the 1891 Mosin and do a review of it for you guys:)

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    1. Here's a web page with two photos of the Dragoon rifle, one before it was refurbished in the arsenal (i.e. original) and one of a refurbished Dragoon. There is also some text describing differences between the M1891 and the Dragoon. There's a table as well on production dates from the different arsenals.

      Numrich is a good outfit. There's also Springfield Sporters, Sarco, and an outfit called NorthRidge that have parts for the old guns.

      Guns over 100 years old don't need any paperwork.

      Sounds like you are having a good time with it, and they are good, reliable, powerful rifles. Ammo is plentiful yet. If you can , it would be good to buy a couple of cans in a wooden case for who knows what?

      Look forward to hearing more about it.

      Delete
  5. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    I keep stuff on hand but I would miss fresh bread and some other stuff if I could not go to Walmart for a month.

    I always get a kick out of how the Israeli's flew German WW2 aircraft and used German weapons to protect their homeland after 1948. The revenge is truly poetic.

    I just ordered a 'Trump' flag using Amazon Prime. Rub that flag in the face of Jeff Bezos and the Washington Post:)

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    1. I'm basically looking for chinks in the armor. I already know medicine is one area we've crashed and burned on, and that was for two weeks, not a month. We are not going to run out of TP, propane, ammo, or anything like that. But doing this forces you to deal with any vulnerabilities in your plan.

      I think the Israelis used anything that would shoot in that war. I know they had virtually every kind of small arms that were used in WW2, which made logistics a real nightmare. They got Czech copies of the BF-109, they got Spitfires, C-46 Commandos, AT-6 Texans, even B-17 Fortresses in that war.

      The Israelis are good fighters, they don't put up with any crap from anybody, and they are Western in thought. They have a concept in their Army called "purity of arms" and they try not to whack civilians, especially women and kids. It frosts my essentials when I see Piss Ants like the Hamas gangsters putting up rockets and artillery in schools and hospitals, then bringing in idiots from the European press to record the "attrocities" that result when the Israelis hit those targets. If you let the Islamists get away with B.S. like that, you wind up with a Beirut Bombing.

      I thought about ordering a Trump bumper sticker, but I am already getting enough sh*t on the road from Dickheads over my Confederate flag sticker and my NRA sticker. They can figure out who I voted for with those two.

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  6. Hey there Captain Crunch, I have a very similar rifle, an 1898 model 91 that has been "Finned". Still has the long barrel, but has a spliced Finn stock, the arshini have been crossed out and remarked in meters. The barrel has been counter bored a half inch or so. I have yet to shoot it, but it is coming up in the rotation, so soon. Have to love a gun built for a Tsar, probably used by the commies, taken by the Finns, and then used to kill commies.

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    1. Hey J Bogan,

      (captaincrunch)

      I have the 'Finned' model too (1900) still with the Arsini sight. I have to check to see if the Arsini's have been crossed out? The stock is solid, one piece far as I can tell and not spliced. I cant find any flaws with the stock. I'm sure mine has been counter bored too. As long as its accurate. It's okay. If rifle operates great, shoots straight. Then I have a winner. Any other advice on what markings, cartouches or what not to look at. I'm all ears (or eyes) in this case.

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    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      I already have a couple of Spam cans of 7.62 by 54R I got years ago dirt cheap. Non-corrosive (I hope) I run the expensive brass 'Seller and Bernet' or PPU brass in the Mosins now. Cleaner and healthier for the older rifles. I don't shoot enough to where its a financial burden buying good brass for those rifles.

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    3. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      Real fast, where's the web page with the pics of the Dragoon's?

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    4. Sorry I left that out. I thought I had put the link in. It's
      http://modernfirearms.net/rifle/repeating-rifle/rus/mosin-e.html

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    5. I hope you aren't throwing away your spent boxer primed brass. 7.62X54 is a popular chambering and you should be able to trade it or sell it to a reloader.

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  7. Harry - many pharmacies will let you set up an automatic refill of your meds, and when your prescription needs renewal, will send a message to your doctor asking for a new prescription. We use CVS, and they are real pests about reminding you that you have a refill ready and/or need to call your doctor for an appointment for a prescription renewal. An advantage to doing 90 day refills is that the pharmacy will often request the doctor send in a new prescription a couple of weeks before the old one runs out, so you can slowly build up some extra (this doesn't work with controlled substances, of course). I worked in a doctor's office, and was very involved with the whole refill thing.

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    1. Some of my wife's medicines are "touchy" and our old doctor would only issue a renewal of the perscription when she was down to just a few pills worth of running out. I talked to our new doctor about this, and asked him to let her accumulate a few pills so that at the end of a cycle we would not be SOL if something happened and we could not get more through the pharmacy. He was not comfortable with this. I told him to wait until he got to know us better, and then we would discuss it again, and he agreed.

      As for me, I just take pills for blood pressure and cholesterol right now, and since there is no market for those on the drug scene my old doctor was not so careful about early renewal.

      So our real problem, Chipmunk, is not getting my wife's medicine, it's getting a few extra to hold back for emergencies. She takes 7 pills a day, and two of them are the problem children.

      I have tried, in the past, to refill the prescription early, say a month early, and accumulate medicine that way, but our pharmacist (Rite Aide) wouldn't do that. I don't know why.

      I would think your suggestion would work for most medicines, and it has worked for us on our more mundane prescriptions. I appreciate your taking the time to pass on the information. Every little bit helps and sometimes, it helps a whole lot!

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  8. A few years ago, my parents including brothers and sisters tested out our supplies for four weeks. What we learned from it was instructional, and in some cases eye opening. I think I still have my families' notes from that experiment. Probably time to try it again soon...

    In that picture it shows an Israeli plane shooting down what looks to be an American Curtiss P-40 with French markings? can't see it too well, I wonder what the real story is on that one.

    I get stressed too, and oftentimes Andean folk music works for me. Reminds me of my time down there too. Here's a sample: --Troy

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=vupbjmYhpgQ&list=PLmozF_njWpT_42xCjbZCxHN_7w7rKX8UG

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    1. Troy, that's a Czechoslovakian built ME-109, fighting an Egyptian Spitfire. What throws you off is that the Avia S-199 was built not with the in line engine of the World War II version, but with the Jumo engine that was used on the JU-88.At the end of the war, the factory that produced the Daimler engines for the 109's was destroyed, but the factory that was producing the Jumo enginers for the JU-88's was not. So the Czechs grafted on the bomber engine to the Me-109 air frame. The result was a real killer of an aircraft, which the Czechs nicknamed the "Mule." It was even worse at ground looping and stalling than the original Me-109. But at the time, it was all the Israelis could get. There was an arms embargo against Israel and only the Czechs would sell arms to them, and then at grossly inflated prices and for cash on the barrel head.

      I've heard Bolivian flute music and I like it. I'll take a look at that link, I can always use some good easy listening music and I appreciate your sending the link.

      I think it's a really good idea to limit yourself to supplies on hand for a period of time and see what jumps out of the woodwork to bite you. Nobody is going to run out of the obvious things like TP, soap, etc. But almost all of us use something that we just don't think about. Those are the things that shake out.

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  9. What a good test to check on and use your food storage. Like you, I would miss the fresh fruits and veggies. It would not be so bad once the garden starts producing, but I would miss apples terribly. We have a lot of dried fruit stored and it is good, but nothing beats a crunchy apple. When we first moved to our location, I tried going three weeks before shopping. It worked pretty well. I was baking my own bread, so that was not a problem. I found myself looking forward to shopping day. Jana

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    1. Jana, this is day 7, and so far we are only out of bagged lettuce, tomatoes, green olives, and guavas. None of that is earth shaking.

      I have apricots, apples, pineapple, mangoes and pears, dried and in bags, in profusion. My mom gets them from some store in Oregon and sends them to me. I also keep a big stock of canned fruit. It's about 50 cents a can for all sorts of canned fruit including oranges, tangerines and fruit cocktail at the scratch and dint grocery store in North Carolina. But even so, I am addicted to fresh apples and the dried stuff just isn't as satisfying. I have 7 apples left in a bowl on the kitchen counter, and then it's dried fruit or no fruit....

      We freeze a lot of bread, mostly rolls and french bread. So we are eating that now. It's not like "fresh" but it beats crackers. I bought a whole lot of cans of ships biscuit once, in big green number 10 cans, and we can eat those with butter or peanut better if we want to, but I like it better when my wife makes bread or corn bread.

      We like to go to the grocery store and look at the magazine rack, and see what's on sale. We won't be able to take advantage of the sales this month as our rule is "no buying" anything in terms of supplies unless we run out of medicine.

      I know what would happen if we didn't adhere to that rule. I would buy apples and eat them, and if I run out of my favorite coffee I would buy that. That would throw the whole exercise out of whack from a psychological standpoint.

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  10. We werev reasonably well prepared at one time, but 15 months of unemployment and several YEARS of underemployment pretty well made that a thing of the past - PERMANENTLY, I suspect. You don't get enough on disability to get ahead any, at least not on what I'M able to draw.

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    1. Gorges, as long as you can put back some rice and beans, at least you won't starve if something happens. One of the reasons we are getting back into gardening is to ek out our long term storage, but also because we like fresh vegetables and we know if there's a Black Swan, we may not be able to get any we didn't grow ourselves.

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  11. What an excellent annual exercise! We do this sometimes too, but not as a scheduled event. It's just the way things are when Dan is out of work!

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    1. Leigh, when that happens, I expect living on your farm is a Godsend. A person can get by without a lot of things, but you have to eat. I've always admired your set up, though I think of you more as a homesteader than a survivalist!

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  12. I've found with Amazon if you type in a product you know, like a book title they will suggest other titles in that genre. That's how I found your site - by reading Eaton Rapids Joe and seeing you listed.
    I like you prepping idea. Might I suggest turning off your grid tie - if you have one. I know you're on solar (as I am).

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    1. Ioran,

      With this Prime subscription, you can go to "Video", then you go to Prime, and it will let you search for "prime video's only." I do that because I don't want to watch a video and then a charge for X amount of money because it wasn't part of the prime deal.

      But with books, I can go to prime and there is no such filter. I go to the prime page, and I put in the title I want, or I put in "post-apocalyptic fiction" and when I hit search , it jumps out of prime and goes to "all." So most of what comes up is what I could buy without prime. Nothing is free. I gather that I can read two book a month free with prime, but I haven't found out how to do it yet.

      On the power. I did built an off grid system here in 1999, but it was a bust. First, my solar panels were "fixed", that is, they did not track the sun. Second, in the winter, here is almost no direct sunlight here, and that was that.

      I do have the generator, which I can run all the buildings off of, although I can't run my washer, dryer, etc off it, even though it's 5KW. I fire up the generator at least once a month and usually more often, so I know I can have power if I need it without the commercial grid.

      If I shut down all the power here, I'd lose food because I have two big Deep freezers choked full.

      I have to say, though, that Strauss, in his book "Emergency" did exactly what you suggest and went the whole hog. He didn't just shut off the power, he butchered animals to try to feed himself and his girl friend, and tried to use a "trench" to substitute for the toilet. His girlfriend bailed out on him after less than a day of that, as I recall.

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  13. Hey Harry,

    (captaincrunch)

    I found the best description yet of the 'Finned' Mosins https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46ZP9XH8bZs
    Its from the Rock Island Auctions. I have the first generation 'Finned' Mosin. Instead of the designation of '1891' The Finns after refurbishing the rifle, re-designated it M91/21. Its nice knowing too the the Finn's polished the trigger, checked barrel alignment and added two shims under the receiver (I found two thin brash shims) It should be a really good shooter (I hope) I also was not clear on what a 'Spliced stock' was. Now I know its a reinforced stock and not a 'repaired' stock. I have a stock that's not 'spiced' it is all original as far as I can tell. No cracks or damages.
    One more thing to mention. I don't mean to brag but I am fortunate that my rifle is in much better condition than the one in the video from 'Rock Island Auctions' I have the original barrel, etc.
    My rifle has the 'SA" cartouche (Finn Army Use) but I think it sat in a crate for decades and decades.

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    1. You've got a really nice rifle there CC. I'd be proud of it too. It's not bragging when you describe the condition of the weapons, it's just is what it is.

      Finnish rifles are a whole different topic in themselves. I bought three or four twenty years ago, and I did it although I wasn't particularly interested in Mosin Nagants. But somebody told me that the Finnish rebuilds were absolutely the best Mosin Nagants ever, and just about that time, Century International Arms got them in dirt cheap. So I got four but I didn't have sense enough to do any of the special ordering I could have done. I didn't even specify the type I wanted, because at the time I knew nothing of the history of Finnish rifles. I still have the guns, and I should down with the collectors book and check them out. But I know they won't be any of the spectacular guns like yours, because I didn't pay the fee for that.

      You've got a really nice find there. I envy you.

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    2. Hey Harry,

      (captaincrunch)

      Check out the video at Rock Island Auctions on the 'Finned' Mosins then check the rifles you have. You may be pleasantly surprised, especially at the low prices you paid years ago and what your rifles may be worth now.

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    3. I should do that. Since I never sell guns, I can only take vicarious pleasure in it when they increase in price. But I should add a column to my spreadsheet showing the current value, to help my son sell them when I am out of the picture. Mainly, when I find out something has gone sky high, I am just glad I bought it when I did, as I couldn't afford to pay today's prices. Gun collecting , especially the old military guns, used to be for "every man." It was not expensive. Now you have to have a good bit of extra scratch to do it.

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  14. That's a great idea to test out your supply stash. A month is a long go of it! I can think of several things we would run out of (fresh fruits/veggies, almond milk for Cort). Like you, we'd have substitutions available, but would miss the real thing. I always eat a toasted bagel with melted peanut butter for breakfast every single morning, so I would miss that (I do keep extra bagels in the freezer but not a month's worth), but obviously I could make do with other things like oatmeal or I could make muffins or pumpkin bread. I've often thought that the one food I would miss the most if it wasn't available anymore is peanut butter. I eat it every single day. I store some, but it is one of those things that I've found goes rancid after some time, so I don't store massive amounts. I've wondered if I could get peanuts growing here. They do grow in Virginia - but more towards the eastern shore where the soil is sandier. Might be worth trying to add sand to some soil to see if I could get some going though. Could be a fun experiment.

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    1. It would be harder for you, with a young family. Kids need things like the almond milk. Adults can get alone with just about anything. I'm out of bacon right now, and I like bacon and eggs. I can open some of the Yoders, much as my cheap self hates to do it, and since there's still 23 days left I will use up a couple of cans rather than do without. I am out of store eggs, so we are eating our own chicken eggs now, but I try really hard not to think about the things I've seen my chickens eat (like snakes and dead chickens.)

      I don't know , seems like you could grow peanuts there. Most of the peanuts they sell here in our county come from New Mexico, which is strange when you think that peanuts is one of Georgia's big cash crops.

      I've kept Peanut butter a long time, and the oil seperates out on the top but I just swirl it back in with a spoon. I have had some go bad but the dogs like it even so, on bread or biscuits, so it isn't really wasted. I wonder if they make peanut butter powder. I'd be amazed if they didn't, you can get every other thing under the sun powdered. Think I will check with some of the on line places.

      The main thing is to have food if something happens and your regular sources dry up. It can happen, I look at all the bad things down in Venezuela that are happening as a result of years of misrule by Chavez, and I think, why not here. We've had many years of misrule and stupid decisions here as well.

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  15. thanks, i think this would be something good for us to try for our preps. Thanks for the idea

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    1. Randy, I got the idea from that book, and it has served me well over the years. It's not very disruptive and it shakes out the things you need that you might have overlooked

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  16. Harry,

    It's always good to run the periodic tests at home on being prepared. We have our medications set to our post office box with automatic renewal. If the script is getting close to expiring, the service will contact the doctor for refills. If a refill is refused we're notified and must make arrangements to go see our doctor for medication refills and the traditional once over.

    I totally understand not taking over your wife's medication for her. She needs to be able to help herself if God forbid something were to happen to you.

    Sending hugs to you both.
    Sandy

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    1. Sandy, it's a lot to juggle. I have more spreadsheets now than I ever used outside of work. My new doctor had my wife and I buy a blood pressure measuring device, and now we have to record our blood pressure every night for him. Seems like things would be getting less complicated, not more so.

      My wife does better about taking her medicine daily than I do, but she doesn't worry much about having her prescriptions filled. We can usually just run down and get the medicine in town if she is here, but if she is up with the kids , it gets a lot more complicated.

      Looks like you are settling in nicely at your new place.

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